• A curve along the Natchez Trace Parkway with fall colors

    Natchez Trace

    Parkway AL,MS,TN

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  • Short Construction Delays Possible Near Tupelo, MS (milepost 264.4)

    Repairs on a bridge will require one-lane closures of the Parkway for about 1/4 mile near Tupelo. Work is expected to be completed in fall of 2014. Please use caution due to construction traffic around the work area. More »

  • Portion of National Scenic Trail Near Tupelo Closed to Hikers

    Part of the Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail (NOT the Parkway) near Tupelo, MS, has been closed until 2015 due to construction under Tupelo's Major Thoroughfare Construction Project. Parkway travelers may expect delays, but no detours are expected. More »

Curriculum Materials

The Natchez Trace Parkway is a diverse blend of history, environment, and recreation. Its thousands of years of human history began with travelers who pre-dated the mound builders, and continues on through 20th century public works projects. The Trace contains diverse environmental features ranging from mixed hardwood forests on foothills, to prairie and swamps. The 444-mile corridor provides opportunities for a vast variety of outdoor recreational experiences. Our educational program reflects the diversity of the Trace and provides educational experiences that engage students and inspire learning.

We are currently updating our pages, so please be patient with our progress and check back as our lessons become searchable. Links to lesson plans are below and also at the bottom of the For Teachers page.

Browse Our Curriculum Materials

Results

Showing results 31-40 of 53

  • Natchez Trace Parkway

    Scavenger Hunt (Fourth Grade)

    Scavenger Hunt (Fourth Grade)

    The teacher will review the components of habitat; food, water, shelter and space. The teacher will take the students on an easy hike on a section of the Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail. The teacher will direct the students in tallying observations. The teacher will lead the students in the analysis and charting of the results of student observation.

  • Natchez Trace Parkway

    Scavenger Hunt (Second Grade)

    Scavenger Hunt (Second Grade)

    The students will walk a National Scenic Trail and tally the different habitat elements are along the trail. The information the students gather will be used to create a bar graph once they return to the classroom.

  • Natchez Trace Parkway

    Scavenger Hunt (First Grade)

    Scavenger Hunt (First Grade)

    The students will walk on a trail that is a portion of the Natchez Trace Parkway National Scenic Trail and try to find examples of habitat that are pictured on a scavenger hunt sheet. The students will learn the various requirements that plants and animals have and how those requirements differ.

  • Natchez Trace Parkway

    Safety First!

    Safety First!

    This is a pre-visit safety lesson. It is highly recommended that this lesson be reviewed before students visit the Natchez Trace Parkway. Students will learn about safety concerns and how to prepare for a visit to the Natchez Trace Parkway through class discussion and checklist. Discuss the safety sheet and hazards students may encounter in the park.

  • Natchez Trace Parkway

    Role Playing on the Natchez Trace Parkway

    Role Playing on the Natchez Trace Parkway

    The teacher will orient the students with an official map of the Natchez Trace Parkway. Prior to playing the game, the teacher will need to obtain “flags” and write character assignments on slips of paper. The students should keep their characters secret. In the flag-football type game, the students will role-play boatmen, American Indians, outlaws, and bears. The slips of paper will also tell students whose flags they may take. The students will draw the names from a “hat”.

  • Natchez Trace Parkway

    Name It

    Name It

    This lesson engages students to determine important locations and creatively develop their own names for places around the school.

  • Natchez Trace Parkway

    Spotted Salamanders: Love those Spots!

    Spotted Salamanders: Love those Spots!

    Spotted Salamanders have yellow spots which warn predators that they are poisonous. While not lethally toxic, their poison makes them taste very bitter to an animal that would like to eat them. Salamanders lay eggs in water and juveniles metamorphose and lizards lay eggs on land and juveniles resemble adults.

  • Natchez Trace Parkway

    Lost on the Trace

    Lost on the Trace

    The students will be divided into pairs and they will pretend they are “Lost on the Trace”. They will be racing against each other to reach their destination by following the directions on a card.

  • Natchez Trace Parkway

    History of the Natchez Trace

    History of the Natchez Trace

    The teacher will read How the Natchez Trace Came to Be to the students and the students will draw a picture of the Natchez Trace. The teacher will read How the Natchez Trace Came to Be to the students. The teacher will make sure that the students are listening and looking closely at the pictures. The students may refer to the pictures when they are drawing their own pictures. The teacher will also help the students to remember facts from the story by retelling the story to the class.

  • Natchez Trace Parkway

    History of the Natchez Trace

    History of the Natchez Trace

    The teacher will show the students a map of the Natchez Trace Parkway and show the students where they live in relation to the Parkway. The teacher will read "How the Natchez Trace Came to Be" (downloadable) to the students. The teacher has the option for several activities. The students can take notes during the reading of the story, help to retell the story, write sentences, fll out a cloze activity, and/or draw a picture of the Natchez Trace Parkway.

Did You Know?

The view from Little Mountain, one of the highest points along the Natchez Trace Parkway.

The terrain along the Natchez Trace Parkway changes from 70 to 1,100 feet in elevation and passes through 5 degrees of latitude.