• Mississippi River from the Bluffs of Natchez

    Natchez

    National Historical Park Mississippi

New Book Tells Story on Equal Rights for Black Citizens

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Date: June 22, 2012

Natchez, MS - Natchez native Geraldine Hollis, author of Back to Mississippi, will sign copies of her newly released book and talk about her experiences with the Tougaloo Nine at the Natchez Visitor Center from 12:00 to 1:30 pm on July 5, 6, and 7. The Eastern National Explore Bookstore will be selling the book.

Back to Mississippi tells the story of Geraldine Hollis, one of the nine young African American adults who in 1961 first challenged the official racially segregated public library system in Jackson, Mississippi.

In her book, the author recalls her journey as she makes her way back home to Mississippi. Readers of Hollis' journey learn of her exposure to segregation, degradation, second class citizenship, degraded educational materials, jail and the circumstances that threatened a black family.

Her book teaches valuable life lessons, stressing the importance of having a purpose, goal or ideal for making things better for the community, family and humankind in general - a noble cause that sometimes comes with pain, hardship or even disappointment.

Hollis is a 1959 graduate of Sadie V. Thompson High School in Natchez, MS. She received her B.S. degree from Tougaloo College 1962. Tougaloo Christian College was a rallying point for social change in Mississippi.

She is a retired educator from the Oakland, CA Unified School District after dedicating 33 years to students from ages 4 to 21 as a teacher, counselor, consultant and workshop promoter. Her goals of continuing to enlighten others lead to the writing and publishing several handbooks, booklets, bulletins and newsletters. Back to Mississippi is her first non-fiction book.

Did You Know?

American free blacks

During the antebellum period, Natchez Mississippi was the home of over two hundred and fifty free blacks. The largest number of free blacks lived in New Orleans and numbered over two thousand.