FR Doc 04-25919
[Federal Register: November 23, 2004 (Volume 69, Number 225)]
[Notices]               
[Page 68172]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr23no04-77]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion: Milwaukee Public Museum, 
Milwaukee, WI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the Milwaukee Public Museum, Milwaukee, 
WI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from 
Fond du Lac, Green Lake, and Winnebago Counties, WI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Milwaukee 
Public Museum professional staff and contract specialists in physical 
anthropology in consultation with representatives of the Ho-Chunk 
Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; Iowa Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and Winnebago 
Tribe of Nebraska.
    In 1926, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from a grave near Luco Creek (site 47-FD-242), Fond du 
Lac, Fond du Lac County, WI, during sewer construction. In 1926, Robert 
Weeks donated a glazed ceramic perfume bottle from this grave to the 
Milwaukee Public Museum. No known individual was identified. The one 
associated funerary object is a glazed ceramic perfume bottle.
    The presence of the perfume bottle dates the burial to the 19th 
century. The human remains from this burial are currently in the 
possession of the Wisconsin Historical Society.
    In 1931, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from a location on the south shore of Lake Puckaway, Green 
Lake County, WI, by Rudolf Boettger. Mr. Boettger donated the human 
remains and an associated funerary object to the Milwaukee Public 
Museum in the same year. No known individuals were identified. The one 
associated funerary object is a copper alloy bracelet.
    The presence of the bracelet dates the burial to circa A.D. 1770-
1900.
    In 1931 and 1932, human remains representing a minimum of two 
individuals were removed from the McCauley Campsite (47-WN-222), 
Oshkosh, Winnebago County, WI, by Arthur P. Kannenberg. The McCauley 
Campsite is located at the point where the Fox River flows into Lake 
Winnebago, between Frankfort and Eveline Streets, Oshkosh, WI. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Archeological evidence indicates that the McCauley site was 
inhabited during the historic period.
    Based on cranial morphology and dental characteristics, the human 
remains are determined to be Native American. Archeological evidence 
and oral historical evidence provided during consultations indicate 
that Luco Creek, Lake Puckaway, and Lake Winnebago, WI, are located 
within the historic territory of the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin 
and the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. The dates of occupation of the 
sites are consistent with the time period during which the 
Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin and the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska 
inhabited the area.
    Officials of the Milwaukee Public Museum have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above 
represent the physical remains of at least three individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the Milwaukee Public Museum also have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the two objects 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Milwaukee Public 
Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects and the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin and the Winnebago 
Tribe of Nebraska.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Dr. Alex Barker, Anthropology Section Head, 
Milwaukee Public Museum, 800 West Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI 53233, 
telephone (414) 278-2786, before December 23, 2004. Repatriation of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to the Ho-Chunk 
Nation of Wisconsin and the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska may proceed 
after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Milwaukee Public Museum is responsible for notifying the 
Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; 
Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and 
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska that this notice has been published.

    Dated: October 7, 2004
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 04-25919 Filed 11-22-04; 8:45 am]

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