FR Doc 03-5512
[Federal Register: March 7, 2003 (Volume 68, Number 45)]
[Notices]               
[Page 11140-11141]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr07mr03-130]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion: Springfield Science Museum, 
Springfield, MA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, Sec. 5, of 
the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the Springfield Science Museum, 
Springfield, MA. These human remains and associated funerary objects 
were removed from various sites in Florida.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003, Sec. 5 
(d)(3). The determinations within this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of these Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations within this notice.

[[Page 11141]]

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Springfield 
Science Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives 
of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida.
    In 1906, human remains consisting of one bone fragment, 
representing one individual, were removed from Rice Creek Mound 
(Florida site [numsign]8PU2), Putnam County, FL, by J.T. Bowne. These 
human remains were donated to the Springfield Science Museum in 1925 by 
Mr. Bowne. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present. Two projectile points collected from the shell 
mound have been identified as Putnam and Levy stemmed varieties, dating 
the shell mound to the Archaic period (5000-1000 B.C.).
    In 1906, human remains consisting of 10 bone fragments, 
representing a minimum of 1 individual, were removed from a shell mound 
on the east bank of the St. Johns River, 5 miles west of Enterprise, 
Seminole County, FL, by J.T. Bowne. These remains were donated to the 
Springfield Science Museum in 1925 by Mr. Bowne. No known individual 
was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. According 
to the Florida State Archaeologist, this site is either the Mound Near 
Fort Florida (Florida site [numsign]8VO50) or Fort Florida Mound 
(Florida site [numsign]8V049), both of which date to the St. Johns II 
period (A.D. 750-1562).
    In 1906, human remains consisting of 42 bone fragments, 
representing a minimum of 2 individuals, were removed from the Spring 
Grove Shell Mound (Florida site [numsign]VO55), Enterprise, Seminole 
County, FL, by J.T. Bowne. These human remains were donated to the 
Springfield Science Museum in 1925 by Mr. Bowne. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. According 
to the Florida State Archaeologist, this site dates to the Orange 
period (circa 2000-100 B.C.).
    In 1906, human remains consisting of 41 bone fragments, 
representing a minimum of 1 individual, were removed from a burial 
mound at Ross Hummock, 3 miles south of Oak Hill, Volusia County, FL, 
by J.T. Bowne. These human remains were donated to the Springfield 
Science Museum in 1925 by Mr. Bowne. No known individual was 
identified. The four associated funerary objects are one turtle 
carapace fragment, two clam shells, and one fragment of St. Johns plain 
pottery, which suggest that the site dates to between 700 B.C. and A.D. 
1562.
    In 1906, human remains consisting of 15 bone fragments, 
representing a minimum of 1 individual, and human remains consisting of 
61 bone fragments, representing a minimum of 2 individuals, were 
removed from a shell mound in Oak Hill, Volusia County, FL, by J.T. 
Bowne. These human remains were donated to the Springfield Science 
Museum in 1925 by Mr. Bowne. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present. According to the Florida State 
Archaeologist, the site is either Florida site [numsign]VO125 or VO128, 
both of which date from the Mount Taylor period to the St. Johns period 
(circa 5000 B.C.-A.D. 1562).
    In 1906, human remains consisting of 31 bone fragments, 
representing a minimum of 3 individuals, were removed from the 
Hernandez Shell Mound (Cotton site) (Florida site [numsign]8VO83), 
Ormond, Volusia County, FL, by J.T. Bowne. These human remains were 
donated to the Springfield Science Museum in 1925 by Mr. Bowne. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present. According to the Florida State Archaeologist, fragments of 
Orange plain, Orange incised, St. Johns plain, St. Johns incised, St. 
Johns cord-marked, and St. Johns check-stamped pottery recovered from 
the site suggest that the site dates from 1500 B.C. to A.D. 1562.
    In 1909, human remains consisting of seven bone fragments, 
representing a minimum of two individuals, were removed from a shell 
mound in Everglades, Collier County, FL, by L.J. Sikes. These human 
remains were donated to the Springfield Science Museum in 1928 by Mr. 
Sikes. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present. Ten fragments of St. Johns plain pottery collected 
in the vicinity of the graves place the age of the site between 500 
B.C. and A.D. 1562.
     In 1912, human remains consisting of 35 bone fragments, 
representing a minimum of 1 individual, were removed from the 
Orangedale Shell Mound (Florida site [numsign]8SJ21), St. Johns County, 
FL, by C.B. Moore and were donated to the Springfield Science Museum 
the same year. No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present. According to the Florida State 
Archaeologist, the plain and stamped pottery recovered at the site 
dates to the St. Johns I and II periods and places the age of the site 
between 700 B.C. and A.D. 1562.
    In 1912, human remains consisting of three bone fragments, 
representing a minimum of one individual, were removed from the Old 
Okahumpta Shell Mound (Florida site [numsign]LA57) near Old Okahumpta, 
Lake County, FL, by C.B. Moore and were donated to the Springfield 
Science Museum the same year. No known individual was identified. The 
associated funerary objects are 14 shell beads. According to the 
Florida State Archaeologist, the site dates to the St. Johns II period 
(A.D. 750-1562).
    The nine sites listed above are located within the known territory 
historically occupied by the Miccosukee Indians. During consultation, 
the sites were identified as earlier occupation areas by 
representatives of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians.
    Officials of the Springfield Science Museum have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001, Sec. 2 (9-10), the human remains listed 
above represent the physical remains of a minimum of 15 individuals of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of the Springfield Science Museum 
also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001, Sec. 2 (3)(A), 
the 18 objects listed above are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the 
Springfield Science Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 
3001, Sec. 2 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that 
can be reasonably traced between these Native American human remains 
and associated funerary objects and the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of 
Florida.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should contact David Stier, Director, Springfield 
Science Museum, 220 State Street, Springfield, MA 01103, telephone 
(413) 263-6800, extension 321, before April 7, 2003. Repatriation of 
these human remains and associated funerary objects to the Miccosukee 
Tribe of Indians of Florida may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The Springfield Science Museum is responsible for notifying the 
Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: January 17, 2003.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships.
[FR Doc. 03-5512 Filed 3-6-03; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4310-70-S


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