[Federal Register: July 11, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 133)]
[Notices]
[Page 45994-45995]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr11jy02-84]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the Columbus
Museum, Columbus, GA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Columbus Museum, Columbus,
GA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Columbus
Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the
Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of
Alabama; Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; and Seminole Tribe of Florida,
Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations.
Representatives of the Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe
of Indians of Florida; Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma were invited
to consult at museum expense, but declined to participate.
    In 1981, human remains representing one individual were removed
during salvage excavations at the Coweta tallahassee site (1RU11),
Russell County, AL, by staff of the Columbus Museum. No known
individual was identified. The 914 associated funerary objects are 1
British sword hilt with blade fragments, 2 musket balls, 2 gun flints,
15 brass buttons, 891 blue glass beads, 1 white glass bead, 1 brass
buckle, and 1 scabbard buckle. The associated funerary objects indicate
that these human remains were probably buried during the early 18th
century. Site 1RU11 is believed to have been the location of the Creek
community of Coweta tallahassee. Benjamin Hawkins, the United States
Principal Temporary Agent for Indians South of the Ohio River,
established an agency at Coweta tallahassee in 1797. He noted that
Coweta tallahassee was inhabited by European Americans, Europeans, and
African Americans, as well as Native Americans. While it is not
possible to conclusively demonstrate that these human remains are
Native American, the preponderance of the evidence supports a
determination that they are more than likely Native American.
    In 1957-1983, human remains representing 66 individuals were
removed during salvage excavations at the Abercrombie site (1RU61),
Russell County, AL, by staff of the Columbus Museum. No known
individuals were identified. The 859 associated funerary objects are
780 whelk shell beads, 5 whelk shell face mask gorgets, 1 pair of shell
earrings, 1 olive shell, 2 large mussel shells, 1 large mussel shell, 1
large cockle shell, 2 greenstone disks, 1 greenstone spatulate celt
(spud), a lithic ``toolkit'' consisting of 41 pieces of chert and 11
pieces of bone or antler, 1 chert flake, 1 bone spatula, 1 bone tine, 1
antler tip, 1 reconstructed pottery jar with scroll design, 1 pottery
duck head effigy, 1 pottery vessel, 1 copper or brass arrow pendent, 1
Hispanic olive jar sherd, and 5 glass trade beads. The three pottery
vessels are believed to have been manufactured around A.D. 1550-1650.
The Hispanic olive jar is believed to have been manufactured around
A.D. 1600. The five glass trade beads are believed to have been
manufactured around A.D. 1590. The associated funerary objects and
other diagnostic artifacts found at site 1RU61 indicate that these
human remains were probably buried during the 16th or early 17th
centuries. Benjamin Hawkins noted that the site was abandoned at the
time of his visit in 1797.
    In the 17th century, the area in which 1RU11 and 1RU61 are located
was called the Province of Apalachicoli by the Spanish. The area is
believed to have been occupied by Hitchiti speakers until the late 17th
century when Muskhogee speakers also known as the Lower Creek --
occupied the area. Both the Hitchiti and the Lower Creek are ancestral
to the present-day Creek and Seminole and other Indian tribes.
    In 1967, human remains representing one individual were removed
from the Pinkston site (1Mc6), Macon County, AL. No known individual
was identified. The human remains were donated to the Columbus Museum
by Frank Morast. Mr. Morast also donated seven items that he identified
as having been found with the human remains. The seven associated
funerary objects are one copper/brass chest plate, two copper/brass
neck bands, one copper/brass disk, and two copper/brass armbands. The
Pinkston site (1Mc6) is purported to have been the Muskogee town site
of Autosi.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the Columbus
Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human
remains listed above represent the physical remains of 68 individuals
of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Columbus Museum also have
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the 1780 objects
listed above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the
death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Columbia Museum have
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship
of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between these
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the
Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida;
Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of
Alabama; Seminole Tribe of Florida, Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton,
Hollywood & Tampa Reservations; Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; and
Thlopthlocco Tribal Town,Oklahoma.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Kialegee Tribal Town,
Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida; Muscogee (Creek)
Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama; Seminole
Tribe of Florida, Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa
Reservations; Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; and Thlopthlocco Tribal
Town, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes
itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains and
associated funerary objects should contact Jeanne Marie Warzeski, the
Columbus Museum, 1251 Wynnton Road, Columbus, GA 31906, telephone (706)
649-0713 or fax (706) 649-1070, before August 12, 2002. Repatriation of
the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Kialegee
Tribal

[[Page 45995]]

Town, Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida; Muscogee
(Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama;
Seminole Tribe of Florida, Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood &
Tampa Reservations; Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; and Thlopthlocco
Tribal Town,. Oklahoma may begin after that date if no additional
claimants come forward.

    Dated: June 6, 2002.
Robert Stearns,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 02-17428 Filed 7-10-02; 8:45 am]
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