[Federal Register: March 25, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 57)]
[Notices]
[Page 13655-13656]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr25mr02-103]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the Peabody Museum
of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology
and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Peabody
Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology professional staff in consultation
with officials of the Wampanoag Repatriation Confederation,
representing the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah), the Mashpee
Wampanoag Indian Tribe (a nonfederally recognized Indian group), and
the Assonet Band of the Wampanoag Nation (a nonfederally recognized
Indian group).
    In 1936, human remains representing one individual from Nantucket,
MA, were donated to the Peabody Museum by Miss Harwood of the Nantucket
Observatory Astronomy Laboratory. The remains were recovered by an
unknown collector at an unknown date. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
     Osteological characteristics indicate that the individual is
Native American. This interment most likely dates to the late Woodland
period or later (post-A.D. 1000). Based on a compilation of
radiocarbon-dated human remains from Nantucket by the Nantucket
Historical Society, it is likely that these human remains are not older
than 1,000 years. To date, no radiocarbon dates for human remains from
Nantucket are earlier than circa A.D. 1000. According to archeological
evidence and oral tradition, the island of Nantucket is located within
the traditional territory of the Wampanoag Nation during the late
Woodland period. The present-day tribes that are most closely
affiliated with members of the Wampanoag Nation are the Wampanoag Tribe
of Gay Head (Aquinnah), the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribe (a
nonfederally recognized Indian group), and the Assonet Band of the
Wampanoag Nation (a nonfederally recognized Indian group).
    In 1941, human remains representing one individual from the Hughes
site, Nantucket, MA, were recovered by Arthur F. Hughes. The human
remains were donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
through Edward Brooks of the Massachusetts Archaeological Society the
same year. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
     According to museum documentation, ceramic sherds, a broken bone
awl, a bent ceramic pipe stem, and a probable Levanna-style triangular
projectile point were found in association with the human remains, but
are not in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology.
    These human remains were found in a traditional Native American-
style burial context, with the head oriented to the northeast and the
face to the east. This interment most likely dates to the late Woodland
period or later (post-A.D. 1000). Based on a compilation of
radiocarbon-dated human remains from Nantucket by the Nantucket
Historical Society, it is likely that these human remains are not older
than 1,000 years. To date, no radiocarbon dates for human remains from
Nantucket are earlier than circa A.D. 1000. Attributed dates of the
stylistic characteristics of the funerary objects from the Hughes site
are consistent with this radiocarbon information. Native ceramic pipes
with bent stems are identified initially during the middle Woodland
period (circa A.D. 1), but are most strongly associated with the late
Woodland period and later (post-A.D. 1000) in New England. Levanna-
style projectile points date to the middle Woodland period and later in
the New England area (post-A.D. 1). According to archeological evidence
and oral tradition, the Hughes site is located within the traditional
territory of the Wampanoag Nation during the late Woodland period. The
present-day tribes that are most closely affiliated with members of the
Wampanoag Nation are the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah), the
Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribe (a nonfederally recognized Indian
group), and the Assonet Band of the

[[Page 13656]]

Wampanoag Nation (a nonfederally recognized Indian group).
    In 1956, human remains representing two individuals from Nantucket,
MA, were donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology by
the Robert S. Peabody Museum, Andover, MA. These human remains had been
collected by Alfred Shurrocks and his wife in 1935, who then donated
them to the Robert S. Peabody Museum. No known individuals were
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Osteological characteristics indicate that the human remains are
Native American. Based on a compilation of radiocarbon-dated human
remains from Nantucket by the Nantucket Historical Society, it is
likely that these human remains are not older than 1,000 years. To
date, no radiocarbon dates for human remains from Nantucket are earlier
than circa A.D. 1000. According to archeological evidence and oral
tradition, the island of Nantucket is located within the traditional
territory of the Wampanoag Nation during the late Woodland period. The
present-day tribes that are most closely affiliated with members of the
Wampanoag Nation are the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah), the
Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribe (a nonfederally recognized Indian
group), and the Assonet Band of the Wampanoag Nation (a nonfederally
recognized Indian group).
    In 1959, human remains representing one individual from Nantucket,
MA, were permanently loaned to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology by the Warren Anatomical Museum at the Harvard Medical
School. These human remains may have been collected by J.M. Warren at
an unknown date because they are from the J.M. Warren collection, which
was assembled by Mr. Warren himself. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Osteological characteristics indicate that the human remains are
Native American. This interment most likely dates to the historic/
contact period (post-A.D. 1500). The pattern of copper stains present
on the cranial remains indicates that they were interred some time
after European contact. Also, based on a compilation of radiocarbon-
dated human remains from Nantucket by the Nantucket Historical Society,
it is likely that these human remains are not older than 1,000 years.
To date, no radiocarbon dates for human remains from Nantucket result
earlier than circa A.D. 1000. Oral tradition and historic documentation
indicate that the island of Nantucket is within the aboriginal and
historic homeland of the Wampanoag Nation during the late Woodland
period. The present-day tribes that are most closely affiliated with
members of the Wampanoag Nation are the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head
(Aquinnah), the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribe (a nonfederally
recognized Indian group), and the Assonet Band of the Wampanoag Nation
(a nonfederally recognized Indian group).
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the Peabody
Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have determined that, pursuant to
43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the
physical remains of five individuals of Native American ancestry.
Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship
of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between these
Native American human remains and the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head
(Aquinnah), and that there is a cultural relationship between these
Native American human remains and the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribe (a
nonfederally recognized Indian group), and the Assonet Band of the
Wampanoag Nation (a nonfederally recognized Indian group).
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Wampanoag
Repatriation Confederation, the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah),
the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribe, and the Assonet Band of the
Wampanoag Nation. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that
believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains
and associated funerary object should contact Patricia Capone,
Repatriation Coordinator, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology,
Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone
(617) 496-3702, before April 24, 2002. Repatriation of these human
remains to the Wampanoag Repatriation Confederation on behalf of the
Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah), the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian
Tribe (a nonfederally recognized Indian group), and the Assonet Band of
the Wampanoag Nation (a nonfederally recognized Indian group), may
begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.

    Dated: February 12, 2002.
Robert Stearns,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 02-7013 Filed 3-22-02; 8:45 am]
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