[Federal Register: March 20, 2001 (Volume 66, Number 54)]
[Notices]
[Page 15744-15745]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr20mr01-94]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the Milwaukee
Public Museum, Milwaukee, WI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Milwaukee Public Museum,
Milwaukee, WI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Milwaukee
Public Museum professional staff and contract specialists in physical
anthropology in consultation with representatives of the Santa Ynez
Band of Mission Indians.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
removed from an unknown location .25 miles inland on the west end of
Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Milwaukee Public Museum
director Henry L. Ward. Mr. Ward donated these human remains to the
Milwaukee Public Museum in 1903. No known individual was identified. No
associated funerary objects are present.
    Following donation to the Milwaukee Public Museum, elements from
this individual were combined with elements of another individual, not
known to be of Native American origin, to form a complete skeleton.
    Based on cranial morphology and dental traits, the remains donated
by Mr. Ward in 1903 have been identified as Native American. Evidence
of the effects of syphilis on the remains suggests that the burial can
be dated to a post-Euro-American contact period. The geographical
location of the burial is consistent with the historically known
territory of the Chumash, represented today by the Santa Ynez Band of
Mission Indians.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the
Milwaukee Public Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains
of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the
Milwaukee Public Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR
10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be
reasonably traced between these Native American human remains and the
Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Santa Ynez Band of
Mission Indians. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that
believes itself to be

[[Page 15745]]

culturally affiliated with these human remains should contact Alex
Barker, Ph.D., Milwaukee Public Museum, 800 West Wells Street,
Milwaukee, WI 53233, telephone (414) 278-2786, before April 19, 2001.
Repatriation of the human remains to the Santa Ynez Band of Mission
Indians may begin after that date if no additional claimants come
forward.

    Dated: February 23, 2001.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships.
[FR Doc. 01-6844 Filed 3-19-01; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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