[Federal Register: February 14, 1997 (Volume 62, Number 31)]
[Notices]
[Page 7039-7040]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects from near Yerington, Nevada, in the
Possession of the Nevada State Museum, Carson City, NV

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interor.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C.
3003 (d), of the completion of an inventory of human remains and
associated funerary objects near Yerington, Nevada, in the possession
of the Nevada State Museum, Carson City, NV.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary
objects was made by the Nevada State Museum professional staff in
consultation with representatives of the Yerington Paiute Tribe.
    Before 1970, human remains representing one individual were
collected by an unknown person and delivered to the Nevada State
Museum. ``Yerington'' was written on the box the human remains were
delivered in. No known individual was identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    Morphological evidence indicates this individual is Native American
based on cranial shape and dental traits. One tooth in the cranium
shows pre-contact type wear and lingual tilting, supporting precontact
but otherwise unknown age. Historic and ethnographic evidence indicates
only the Yerington Paiute Tribe has occupied the Yerington area in
historic times, and no non-Paiute precontact cultures have been
identified within the Yerington area. Oral tradition presented by
representatives of the Yerington Paiute Tribe supports this conclusion.
    In 1984, human remains representing one individual were recovered
during water line construction by the City of Yerington, Nevada. No
known individual was identified. The 759 associated funerary objects
include: 12 white buttons, one blue button, and 745 turquoise-colored,
blue and black glass trade beads.
    Morphological evidence indicates this individual is Native American
based on cranial shape and dental traits. The associated funerary
objects date this burial to after 1840. The manner of internment and
the presence of glass beads and clothing buttons are consistent with
Northern Paiute burials in this region. Consultation evidence indicates
the Yerington Paiute Tribe has occupied this area since precontact
times. Historic and ethnographic evidence indicates only the Yerington
Paiute Tribe has occupied the Yerington area in historic times, and no
non-Paiute precontact cultures have been identified within the
Yerington area.
    In 1987, human remains representing one individual were recovered
from Smith Valley, Lyon County, NV, by the Nevada Division of
Investigations and turned over to the Nevada State Museum when it was
determined to be a Native American individual. No known individual was
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Historic and ethnographic evidence indicates only the Yerington
Paiute Tribe has occupied the Yerington area in historic times, and no
non-Paiute precontact cultures have been identified within the
Yerington area. Oral tradition presented by representatives of the
Yerington Paiute Tribe support this conclusion.
    In May of 1990, human remains representing one individual was found
by a private citizen near Yerington, Nevada, and reported to the Lyon
County Sheriff's Office. No known individual was identified. The eight
associated funerary objects include: denim jeans, a wool army jacket, a
braided hackamore bosal, metal rings and leather representing a saddle,
and

[[Page 7040]]

wrappings consisting of a rabbit skin blanket, and possibly a wool
blanket.
    Based on biometric attributes, this individual has been identified
as Paiute. The associated funerary objects date this burial to ca.
1920. The tightly flexed posture, talus burial setting, twined rabbit
skin blanket, and burial with horse tack is also consistent with
specifically Northern Paiute burial practices. Consultation evidence
indicates the Yerington Paiute Tribe has occupied this area since
precontact times.
    In 1990, human remains representing one individual were recovered
by the Nevada Division of Investigations during shallow land leveling
operations preparing a hay pad in a sandy area of a privately owned
ranch near Yerington, Nevada. The human remains were identified as
Native American and turned over to the Nevada State Museum. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Historic and ethnographic evidence indicates only the Yerington
Paiute Tribe has occupied the Yerington area in historic times, and no
non-Paiute precontact cultures have been identified within the
Yerington area. Oral tradition presented by representatives of the
Yerington Paiute Tribe support this conclusion.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
exposed by heavy equipment on the John Connaly (Connolly?) Ranch in
Mason Valley, Nevada, and turned over to the Nevada State Museum by an
unknown person. No known individual was identified. The 1,870
associated funerary objects include: a leather thong, a rubber shoe
fragment, four buttons (two bone, two white glass), three metal shanked
buttons, 1,803 glass beads, a brass band (1 by 2 inches) and 57
olivella shell beads.
    Morphological evidence indicates this individual is Native American
based on biometric attributes, cranial shape, and dental traits. The
associated funerary objects indicates this burial dates after 1840, and
are consistent with funerary objects present in known Northern Paiute
(including Yerington Paiute) historic burials. Consultation evidence
presented by representatives of the Yerington Paiute Tribe indicates
the area of Connolly Ranch was a burial area for a Yerington Paiute
family.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were
found by Mr. and Mrs. George Compston, ``near Yerington'', Nevada and
donated to the Nevada State Museum. No known individual was identified.
The approximately 3,135 associated funerary objects include: 3,071
glass trade beads, 60 pine nuts, several twine and cordage fragments,
four buttons, and wood fragments.
    This individual has identified as Native American based on the
associated funerary objects present. The associated funerary objects
also indicate this burial dates after 1840, when such objects became
locally available with the immigration of American settlers through
Nevada. The cloth wrapping, associated beads and pine nuts indicates
this was an intentional Northern Paiute burial. Consultation evidence
indicates the Yerington Paiute Tribe has occupied this area since
precontact times.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the Nevada
State Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the
human remains listed above represent the physical remains of seven
individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Nevada State
Museum have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A),
the 5,772 objects listed above are reasonably believed to have been
placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or
later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the
Nevada State Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001
(2), and 43 CFR 10.9 (d)(1) there is a relationship of shared group
identity which can be reasonably traced between these Native American
human remains and associated funerary objects and the Yerington Paiute
Tribe.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Yerington Paiute
Tribe, Fallon Paiute Shoshone Tribes, Washoe Tribe of California and
Nevada, Walker River Paiute Tribe, and Pyramid Lake Tribe.
Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be
culturally affiliated with these human remains and associated funerary
objects should contact Amy Dansie, Nevada Division of Museums and
History NAGPRA coordinator, 600 N. Carson, Carson City, Nevada 89710;
telephone: (702) 687-4810, extension 245, before March 17, 1997.
Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to
the Yerington Paiute Tribe may begin after that date if no additional
claimants come forward.
Dated: January 31, 1997.
Veletta Canouts,
Acting Departmental Consulting Archeolgist,
Deputy Manager, Archeology and Ethnograpy Program.
[FR Doc. 97-3683 Filed 2-13-97; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

Back to the top

Back to National-NAGPRA