FR Doc 03-25537
[Federal Register: October 8, 2003 (Volume 68, Number 195)]
[Notices]               
[Page 58132]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr08oc03-82]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Carnegie Museum of 
Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native America Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.8 (f), of the 
intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Carnegie 
Museum of Natural History, PA, that meets the definitions of sacred 
object and cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of 
the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the 
cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations within this notice.
    In the late 19th or early 20th century, John A. Beck purchased a 
gray slate pipe bowl of a type often referred to as a ``Micmac'' pipe. 
The pipe bowl contained a small amount of burned substance when it was 
acquired. Information provided to Mr. Beck indicated that the pipe came 
from Harbor Springs, MI. In 1925, the Beck collection was loaned to the 
Carnegie Museum of Natural History. In 1968, Mr. Beck's heirs donated 
the majority of the collection, including the pipe bowl, to the 
Carnegie Museum of Natural History.
    The presence of the burned substance in the bowl indicates that the 
pipe was probably in use during the late 19th or early 20th century. 
Harbor Springs, MI, is located within the area occupied by the 
ancestors of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan 
during the late 19th or early 20th century. Representatives of the 
Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan have identified 
the pipe as a specific ceremonial object that is needed by traditional 
Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional 
Native American religions by present-day adherents. Representatives of 
the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan also have 
identified the pipe as a Manido (spirit) or grandfather that was, and 
is, a part of the community and as such could not have been alienated 
by any tribal member.
    Officials of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(C), the cultural item is a 
specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native American 
religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American 
religions by their present-day adherents. Officials of the Carnegie 
Museum of Natural History also have determined that pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001 (3)(D), the cultural item has ongoing historical, 
traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American 
group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. 
Lastly, officials of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony and the Little 
Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with this sacred object/object of cultural 
patrimony should contact Dr. David R. Watters, Carnegie Museum of 
Natural History, 5800 Baum Boulevard, Pittsburgh, PA 15206-3706, 
telephone (412) 665-2605, before November 7, 2003. Repatriation of the 
sacred object/object of cultural patrimony to the Little Traverse Bay 
Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The Carnegie Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying 
the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan that this 
notice has been published.

    Dated: August 20, 2003.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources.
[FR Doc. 03-25537 Filed 10-7-03; 8:45 am]

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