[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 211 (Thursday, October 31, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65371-65375]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov ]
[FR Doc No: 2013-26005]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-14034; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human 
remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian 
tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian 
tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice 
that wish to request transfer of control

[[Page 65372]]

of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request to the University of Michigan. If no additional 
requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and 
associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to the University of Michigan at the address in this notice 
by December 2, 2013.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of 
Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming 
Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1340, telephone (734) 
647-9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from Macomb, Monroe, and Wayne Counties, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Bay 
Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky 
Boy's Reservation, Montana; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa 
Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay 
Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, 
Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-
e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; 
Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed 
as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, 
Michigan and Indiana; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; and 
the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan.
    Additional requests for consultation were sent to the Absentee-
Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Bad River Band of the Lake 
Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, 
Wisconsin; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, 
Minnesota; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, 
Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest 
County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the 
Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of 
Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; 
Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Leech 
Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Miami Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Prairie 
Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band of 
Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian 
Reservation, California & Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, 
Minnesota; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & 
Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; 
Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New 
York); Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Shawnee Tribe; Sokaogon 
Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; 
Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of 
Seneca Indians of New York); Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians 
of North Dakota; White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, 
Minnesota; and the Wyandotte Nation.
    Hereafter, all tribes listed in this section are referred to as 
``The Tribes.''

History and Description of the Remains

    On an unknown date prior to 1962, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Verchave 3 site 
(20MB182) in Macomb County, MI. Farmers found the sun-bleached and very 
fragmentary remains of one adult on the surface while removing sand and 
donated the remains to the University of Michigan Museum of 
Anthropology (UMMA). Archeologist James Fitting later described the 
burial site as being part of a larger multicomponent site that included 
a layer of post-contact occupation, including a possible cemetery, over 
a layer of pre-contact occupation. No date or time period for the human 
remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were 
removed from the Norton site (20MB5) in Macomb County, MI. Charles 
Delaney of the UMMA originally reported finding human remains, pottery, 
and other ``relics'' during surface surveys near Romeo, MI. In 1937, 
Emerson Greenman of the UMMA carried out excavations in the same area 
and found evidence of a village approximately 400 yards away. The human 
remains date to the Springwells Phase of the Late Woodland Period 
(1200-1400 A.D.) based on the pottery collected from the nearby 
village. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    On April 25, 1979, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from the Feick site (20MR281) in Monroe County, 
MI. A backhoe driver unearthed the human remains during sand removal 
operations near Exeter Road. The remains were taken to a biology 
teacher at Monroe High School for identification and later donated to 
the UMMA by the Monroe County Sheriff's Department. The remains were 
identified as being Native American and representing one adult, 
possibly female. No date or time period for the human remains could be 
established. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In June of 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from Otter Creek Road site (20MR44) in Monroe 
County, MI. David Brose of the UMMA collected the human remains 
representing one adult during a surface survey on private property. The 
landowner also collected artifacts from the site, but did not donate 
them to the UMMA. The

[[Page 65373]]

museum has no further information about this collection. The human 
remains date to the Late Woodland Period (800-1400 A.D.) based on the 
artifacts collected by the landowner. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date prior to 1940, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Near Lake Erie site in 
Monroe County, MI. The remains of two adults were likely found in 1924 
during grading activities associated with railroad tracks running 
through Bedford Township, MI. Museum records indicate that the human 
remains, along with associated funerary objects, were collected from 
the site and subsequently donated to the UMMA on an unknown date during 
the 1930s. The human remains date to the Late Woodland Period (500-1400 
A.D.) based on diagnostic artifacts. No known individuals were 
identified. The 12 associated funerary objects present are ceramic 
sherds.
    In June of 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from the Strasburg Ridge site (20MR128) in 
Monroe County, MI. David Brose of the UMMA collected the remains of one 
adult during a surface survey of an open field. No date or time period 
for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On multiple dates between 1959 and 1980, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 26 individuals were removed from the Lucy 
King site (20MR2) in Monroe County, MI. In 1959, Mark Papworth of the 
UMMA conducted the first excavation of at least 11 individuals. 
Papworth collected multiple bundle burials from a small, shallow pit, 
and noted multiple commingled remains of various ages. A publication 
about the excavation notes multiple Brewerton stemmed points being 
found in association with the human remains, but the museum has no 
record of these points being donated to the UMMA. The presence of these 
points suggest the human remains date to the Late Archaic Period. In 
1972, archeologists from Western Michigan University conducted a second 
excavation of at least three individuals, and subsequently donated 
those remains to the UMMA in 1979. Most of the remains from this 
excavation came from the plow zone and, as a result, are very 
fragmentary and were not found in an archeological context. In 1977, 
archeologists from the UMMA conducted a third excavation of at least 
one individual. Again, most of the human remains came from the plow 
zone and were not found in an archeological context. Finally, in 1980, 
a backhoe operating near the site inadvertently unearthed human 
remains. James J. Krakker of the UMMA was contacted to conduct a 
salvage excavation of at least 11 individuals. Krakker excavated the 
undisturbed portion of an ossuary and was also able to assign features 
at the site. Several individuals were noted as being buried in a flexed 
position, including one area of the site that showed evidence of having 
been burned. Marginella beads were found buried in association with one 
individual from the ossuary. Several of the individuals found during 
Krakker's excavation showed signs of extensive pathologies suggesting 
they suffered from infectious disease and possibly treponemal disease. 
A date or time period for the human remains is difficult to establish 
due to the complexity of the site and lack of an archeological context 
for most of the collections. The human remains date to, at the 
earliest, the Late Archaic Period, and, at the latest, the Woodland/
Late Woodland Period (500-1600 A.D.). No known individuals were 
identified. The 1 associated funerary object is 1 lot of Marginella 
shells.
    In June of 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 
individuals were removed from the Bay Creek site (20MR31) in Monroe 
County, MI. David Brose of the UMMA found the remains of at least one 
adult and one child during a surface survey south of Bay Creek. The 
human remains date to between the Late Woodland and Post-Contact 
Periods (500 A.D.-1850 A.D.) based on diagnostic artifacts collected 
from other areas of the site. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1940, human remains representing, at minimum, 13 individuals 
were removed from the Indian Trails site (20MR4) in Monroe County, MI. 
Ralph Patton of the UMMA excavated the remains of five adults, five 
older adults, two juveniles, and one cremated juvenile from a burial 
pit near Little Swan Creek. The remains of several additional 
individuals were noted but not collected due to their fragile 
condition. The site included multiple burials pits wherein various 
mortuary practices were evident. Patton noted extended burials, bundle 
burials, cremations, red ochre treatments, and post-mortem 
modifications such as plaque removals. The human remains date to the 
Middle Late Woodland Period (1184 A.D. 112 years) based on 
radiocarbon 14 dating. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date in 1967, and on an unknown date between 1982-
1984, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed 
from the Morin site (20MR40) in Monroe County, MI. A landowner 
unearthed human remains while digging to install a pipeline on his 
property in Erie Township, MI. In 1967, an amateur archeologist 
conducted multiple excavations at the site and collected human remains 
and associated funerary objects. The individuals were noted as being 
buried in an extended position. The UMMA received some of the 
associated funerary objects from these initial excavations as 
donations, but the museum received no human remains from this 
collector. On an unknown date between 1982 and 1984, another amateur 
archeologist excavated human remains from the site on multiple 
occasions. Approximately one-quarter of the site was reportedly 
excavated. The remains of one adolescent were collected along with 
associated funerary objects. Additional objects were collected from the 
site, although these objects date to a different time period than the 
burials. The human remains date to the Late Woodland Period (500-1200 
A.D.) based on diagnostic artifacts and chronometric dating. No known 
individuals were identified. The 40 associated funerary objects present 
are 1 biface projectile point (with a corner removed), 1 lot of ceramic 
sherds (from a single vessel), 19 ceramic sherds (from a single 
vessel), and 19 bird bones.
    On an unknown date prior to 1956, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 9 individuals were removed from the Foot of First Street site 
(20WN52) in Wayne County, MI. Workers discovered the burials below 
First Street while excavating for sewer lines. A local businessman and 
landowner collected the remains of four adults, two adolescents, and 
three children, and gave them to an employee of the Detroit Public 
Library who worked in the Burton Historical Collection. The employee 
subsequently donated the human remains to the UMMA in 1956. No date or 
time period for the human remains could be established for the burials, 
although a note on file from the State Archaeologist's Office of 
Michigan indicates that the area where the remains were discovered was 
once the site of a Huron (Wyandot) village in the Post-Contact Period. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    On April 13, 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual

[[Page 65374]]

were removed from the Michigan State Police site (20WN1010) in Wayne 
County, MI. A local resident discovered and collected the cranium of an 
adult female from a location near State Highway 25. The police 
concluded the human remains were from a Native American burial site and 
transferred them to the UMMA. No date or time period for the human 
remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date in the 1950s, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Waywash site in Wayne 
County, MI. A local resident discovered and collected the remains of 
one adult from the surface of the ground. The human remains were 
subsequently donated to the UMMA in 1971. No date or time period for 
the human remains could be established. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Sometime before March 20, 1935, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Sanderson D-8 site 
(20WN240) in Wayne County, MI. A local resident found the human remains 
on the surface of the ground in a road cut. The remains of one adult 
were collected and donated to the UMMA on March 20, 1935. No date or 
time period for the human remains could be established. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1932, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Huron River 3 site (20WN253) in Wayne County, 
MI. Amateur collectors found the human remains on the surface of the 
ground while traveling through the area. They collected the human 
remains and subsequently donated them to the UMMA. No date or time 
period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1932, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were 
removed from the Holmquist W-19 site (20WN131) in Wayne County, MI. 
Amateur collectors found the human remains while traveling near the 
Huron River, representing one adult male and one older adult (possibly 
female). The remains were subsequently donated to the UMMA. The adult 
male's cranium had evidence of a post-mortem plaque removal. The human 
remains date to the Woodland Period (850-1400 A.D.) based on mortuary 
treatment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    On an unknown date prior to 1935, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 4 individuals were removed from the Granville site in Wayne 
County, MI. A local resident collected the remains of three adults and 
one child from a location near New Boston, MI, and gave the remains to 
an amateur collector who subsequently donated them to the UMMA in 1935. 
No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1889, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 individuals were 
removed from the Exposition Grounds site (20WN7) in Wayne County, MI. 
The human remains were likely found during construction activities at 
the International Exposition Grounds near historic Ft. Wayne in 
Detroit, MI. The remains of two adults (one possibly male), one child, 
and one infant were collected and given to a local politician who 
subsequently donated the collections to the UMMA on an unknown date. 
Historical sources indicate that the site contained a Native American 
burial ground known as ``Great Mound.'' This mound was destroyed at 
some point prior to the construction of the exposition grounds. No date 
or time period for the human remains could be established. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1933, 1934, and 1935, human remains representing, at minimum, 28 
individuals were removed from the Huron River 2 site (20WN132) 
in Wayne County, MI. In 1933, an amateur collector found human remains 
and artifacts near the Huron River in Huron Township, MI. He noted 
finding two complete skeletons at the site, oriented in an east-west 
direction, and an additional cranium situated in a north-south 
direction. The collector also reported finding at least 30 petrosal 
portions that he suggested were from children. The human remains were 
not collected, but instead reburied due to their fragile condition. 
Many artifacts made from flint were noted, but were not collected. 
Other types of associated funerary objects were collected from the site 
and subsequently donated to the UMMA. In 1934, Wilbert Hinsdale of the 
UMMA excavated multiple individuals from this site along with 
associated funerary objects. Hinsdale noted the individuals were buried 
in a variety of postures. Some individuals were interred in an extended 
position, lying side-by-side, with the heads of some individuals in 
line with the feet of other individuals. Three individuals were 
interred face down with the cranium of one of these individuals facing 
to the right. Bundle burials were also present at the site, some 
intruding into other burials. Some burials were also located above 
other burials, with mixed ash and charcoal between them. Hinsdale also 
noted that four craniums of individuals lying in an extended position 
had post-mortem perforations near the vertex. Additionally, multiple 
craniums were plastered over with clay pushed into the eye orbits, 
ears, and nasal area. It is unclear if the craniums with clay were the 
same as those that had perforations. Hinsdale also noted that fish 
bones were found in the fill dirt, but they are not present in the 
collection. In 1935, an amateur collector excavated additional 
individuals and associated funerary objects from this site, and donated 
them to the UMMA. Finally, 1 lot of DNA extractions was taken from the 
site in 2006. The human remains date to the Early Late Woodland Period 
(500-900 A.D.) based on diagnostic artifacts and mortuary treatment. No 
known individuals were identified. The 159 associated funerary objects 
present are 83 ceramic sherds, 4 ceramic sherds without decoration, 33 
stone and ceramic sherds, 7 chert flakes and points, 1 lithic scraper, 
2 lithic fragments, 23 clay fragments, 1 ceramic elbow pipe, and 5 
animal bones.
    In 1932, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Huron River 6 site (20WN242) in Wayne County, 
MI. Amateur collectors removed the remains of an adolescent from the 
surface near the Huron River and subsequently donated them to the UMMA 
in April of 1936. No date or time period for the human remains could be 
established. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    On April 5, 1981, human remains representing the remains of, at 
minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Rennie site (20WN160) in 
Wayne County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected the remains of one 
adult from the surface near the Huron River and subsequently donated 
them to the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be 
established. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    On September 13, 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, 10 
individuals were removed from the Arbor Springs site (20WN1008) in 
Wayne County, MI. A landowner unearthed human remains with a backhoe 
during construction activities in his yard. He contacted the UMMA, and 
John O'Shea and Claire McHale conducted a salvage excavation at the

[[Page 65375]]

site. They identified a partially destroyed ossuary and collected the 
remains of nine adults and one infant. The landowner donated only some 
of the excavated human remains to the museum. The human remains date to 
the Late Woodland Period (500-1640 A.D.) based on mortuary treatment. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    In 1890, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Warner site (20WN1011) in Wayne County, MI. A local 
resident collected the remains of an older adult female near Highway 12 
in Nankin Township, MI, and donated them to the UMMA in 1933. The 
museum has no further information about this collection. The human 
remains date to the Early Late Woodland Period (500-1100 A.D.) based on 
diagnostic objects. No known individuals were identified. The 20 
associated funerary objects present are ceramic sherds.

Determinations Made by the University of Michigan Museum of 
Anthropology

    Officials of the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on cranial morphology, dental 
traits, accession documentation, and archeological context.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 114 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 232 objects 
described in this notice reasonably believed to have been placed with 
or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part 
of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day 
Indian tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed is the aboriginal land of the Bad River Band of the Lake 
Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, 
Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Bois Forte Band (Nett 
Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Chippewa-Cree Indians 
of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, 
Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Fond du 
Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County 
Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota 
Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa 
Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay 
Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac 
Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Leech 
Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Little River Band 
of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa 
Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians 
of Michigan; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, 
Minnesota; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan 
(previously listed as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; 
Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band 
of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian 
Reservation, California & Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, 
Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie 
Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, 
Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain 
Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; White Earth Band of the 
Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; and the Wyandotte Nation.
     Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate 
that the land from which the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of The 
Tribes.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects may be to The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Ben 
Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of the 
Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., 
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1340, telephone (734) 647-9085, email 
bsecunda@umich.edu, by December 2, 2013. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may 
proceed.
    The University of Michigan is responsible for notifying The Tribes 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 16, 2013.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2013-26005 Filed 10-30-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P


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