[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 116 (Monday, June 17, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 36239-36241]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-14357]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-13191; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Wayne State University Gordon L. 
Grosscup Museum of Anthropology, Detroit, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Wayne State University Gordon L. Grosscup Museum of 
Anthropology (hereafter WSU Museum) has completed an inventory of human 
remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian 
tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian 
tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice 
that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and 
associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the WSU 
Museum. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control 
of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian 
tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may 
proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to the WSU Museum at the address in this notice by July 17, 
2013.

ADDRESSES: Thomas Killion, Department of Anthropology, Wayne State 
University Gordon L. Grosscup Museum of Anthropology, 3056 F/AB, 
Detroit, MI 48202, telephone (313) 577-2935.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the WSU Museum, 
Detroit, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed from the following counties in the state of Michigan: Delta, 
Macomb, Mecosta, Monroe, Oakland, Saginaw, St. Clair, and Wayne.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the WSU 
Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and 
Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; 
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake 
Superior Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa 
Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, 
Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of 
Michigan; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi Indians, Michigan 
(previously listed as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of 
Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe 
of Michigan; and the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of 
Michigan (hereafter referred to as ``The Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    In April 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (9W011-9W012) were uncovered by the property owner, Kermit 
Day, while turning over his garden in Melvindale, Wayne County, MI. The 
human remains and associated artifacts were released to the state 
police for identification. The Wayne County Medical Examiner identified 
the human remains as being those of a Native American (``Mongoloid'') 
female. The human remains were likely not removed from their primary 
context due to the partial nature of the burial. The human remains were 
transferred to the WSU Museum from the Wayne County Medical Examiner's 
Office in December 1958. No known individuals were identified. The 
objects removed with the human remains reportedly included a pair of 
scissors, a hand blown bottle, a scalpel, six silver bracelets, and 
several hand-hammered chain links. These objects went with the human 
remains to the Medical Examiner's Office, but they were never 
accessioned by the WSU Museum. Therefore, no associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In November 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals (9W016) were recovered by the owner of the Falker Gravel 
Pit (site 20MB58), in Romeo, Macomb County, MI. The human remains were 
turned over to the state police for identification. The human remains 
were transferred to the WSU Museum in December 1958. The human remains 
consist of 18 long bone fragments, pertaining to two separate 
individuals. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In December 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (9W009), consisting of an isolated mandible, were 
transferred to the WSU Museum on permanent loan from the University of 
Michigan. No

[[Page 36240]]

known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In April 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (9W014-9W015) were collected from the surface of Caspar 
Hillock Property, in New Baltimore, Macomb County, MI. The human 
remains, consisting of two small cranial fragments, were reportedly 
recovered near the edge of the lakeshore in Anchor Bay, and the site 
received the designation of 20-MB-02. The remains were accessioned by 
the WSU Museum in April 1959. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Between 1940 and 1959, several boxes of archaeological materials 
were collected by Jerome DeVisscher at the Riviere au Vase Site (20-MB-
03), ``behind Green School,'' in Mt. Clemens, Macomb County, MI. These 
materials were accessioned by the WSU Museum in December 1959. Included 
in the boxes was a human molar and fragments of human bone 
representing, at minimum, two individuals. There is no information 
available on the context of these human remains and no reported 
associated funerary objects. The human remains consist of a single 
second molar (9W019) and the poorly preserved partial skeletons of two 
separate individuals (9W850 and 9W851). No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(9W013, 9W020-9W028, 9W030-9W031, 9W051-9W094, 9W151-9W155) were 
recovered by the Wayne State Archaeological Field School from the 
Hillock Site (20-MB-29) in Chesterfield Township, Macomb County, MI. 
The human remains were excavated from part of the site referred to in 
records as ``Roger's Property.'' A borrow pit had been created on the 
site due to the removal of sand during the previous winter. The burial 
was found on either side of this borrow pit. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In July 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (9W029) were collected on the surface by Dr. Arnold Pilling 
and a student at site Trinity's 31 (20-MB-110) located near 
the intersection of Hall and Sugarbush Roads, in Chesterfield Township, 
Macomb County, MI. The human remains were accessioned by the WSU Museum 
in February 1963. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(9W032) was recovered by workman during construction of an addition to 
the Wayne State University Medical School, in Wayne County, MI. The 
human remains were catalogued by the WSU Museum in February 1963. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(9W620-9W639) were donated to the WSU Museum by Basil Williams. The 
human remains were reportedly recovered from the Tessamer Site (20-OK-
3), located on the south side of School Road midway between Dequindre 
and John R Roads, in Avon Township, Oakland County, MI. The Tessamer 
Site was reportedly a Native American burial ground dating to the 
Woodland period. Excavations had previously been conducted at the site 
by Cranbrook Institute, the University of Michigan, and private 
collectors. The site report states that ossuaries as well as individual 
burials were found at the site. The site is reported to have been 
almost completely destroyed by 1959. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
(9W651) were discovered by James Lake in his backyard in Romulus, Wayne 
County, MI. The human remains were sent to the Wayne County Medical 
Examiner's Office for identification. They were subsequently 
accessioned by the WSU Museum in June 1965. No known individuals were 
identified. The objects removed with the human remains reportedly 
included a total of 59 white seed beads and four fragments of a metal 
finger ring. Although these items were accessioned by the WSU Museum, 
they could not be physically located during the inventory process and 
are no longer present in the collection. Therefore, no associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, 30 individuals 
were accessioned by the WSU Museum (Acc. 838). The remains 
were donated by Al Weir on behalf of a Dr. Haggey. The human remains 
were removed from the Tyra Site (20-SA-09) in the Saginaw Valley, 
Saginaw County, MI, by the Saginaw Chapter of the Michigan 
Archaeological Society in 1968. No known individuals were identified. 
The three associated funerary objects consist of a shell bead and two 
pottery fragments.
    In June 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals (9W616-9W617, 9W728-9W729) were accessioned by the WSU 
Museum. The human remains had been removed from Stoney Island, located 
in Lake Huron, Wayne County, MI, and donated to the WSU Museum by Evet 
Zias. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In February 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (9W878) were donated to the WSU Museum by A. Spooner and K. 
Parchert. The human remains were reportedly removed from Gibraltar, 
Wayne County, MI, from ``Site No. 2.'' They were recovered in what was 
described as a refuse pit with several pieces of animal bone. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In November 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (9W882) were donated to the WSU Museum by Norris Blackledge 
of Rockwood, MI. There is no information on the location from which the 
human remains were removed, but presumably, they were removed from a 
location in southeastern Michigan. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In April 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (9W889) were donated to the WSU Museum by A.L. Spooner as 
part of a lot of prehistoric materials. The human remains were likely 
removed from a location in southeast Michigan between 1940 and 1959, 
likely from Monroe County, MI. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In November 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (9W892) were donated to the WSU Museum by A.L. Spooner as 
part of a lot of prehistoric materials. The human remains were 
reportedly recovered ``across from the Chris Craft plant'' in Algonac, 
St. Clair County, MI. No known individuals were identified. The object 
removed with the human remains reportedly included a ceramic vessel, 
but this object was never accessioned by the WSU Museum. Therefore, no 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In November 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (9W893) were donated to the WSU Museum by A.L. Spooner as 
part of a lot of prehistoric materials. The human remains were 
reportedly recovered from the Kronberg Farm on Dearborn Road, probably 
in Wayne County, MI. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In November 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (9W894) were donated to the WSU Museum by A.L. Spooner as 
part

[[Page 36241]]

of a lot of prehistoric materials. There is no provenience information 
associated with these human remains. The human remains consist of a 
single skull that exhibits intentional occipital flattening. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In November 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (9W895) were donated to the WSU Museum by A.L. Spooner as 
part of a lot of prehistoric materials (Acc No. 2353). The remains were 
reportedly recovered from the ``Barryton Village Dump'' in Mecosta 
County, MI. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1984, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals 
were accessioned by the WSU Museum (Acc. 2156). The human 
remains were accidentaly encountered during excavations for swimming 
pool on the property of Mr. and Mrs. Bill Saliba in Clinton Township, 
Macomb County, MI. The location corresponds fairly closely with a known 
historic cemetery associated with the Moravian Mission village (20MB62) 
of Christianized Indians established there in 1782. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 2005, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were accessioned by the WSU Museum (Acc. 5231). The human 
remains were donated by Burton Barnard in 1970. They were removed from 
near a historic settlement on Summer Island, Delta County, MI, in July 
1969, by the University of Michigan's Summer Island science field camp. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.

Determinations Made By the WSU Museum

    Officials of the WSU Museum have determined that:
 Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in 
this notice are Native American based on museum records, the reported 
presence of funerary objects in some instances, the dentition in some 
instances, and/or the manner of burial in some instances.
 Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in 
this notice represent the physical remains of a minimum of 57 
individuals of Native American ancestry.
 Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the three objects described 
in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
 Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group 
identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human 
remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian 
tribe.
 According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission 
or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American 
human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of The Tribes.
 Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human 
remains and associated funerary objects may be to The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Thomas 
Killion, Department of Anthropology, Wayne State University, Detroit, 
MI 48202, telephone (313) 577-2935, by July 17, 2013. After that date, 
if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of 
the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may 
proceed.
    The WSU Museum is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this 
notice has been published.

    Dated: May 28, 2013.
Melanie O'Brien,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2013-14357 Filed 6-14-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P

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