FR Doc E6-22343
[Federal Register: December 29, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 250)]
[Notices]               
[Page 78459-78461]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr29de06-99]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service
Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural 
History, New York, NY

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves

[[Page 78460]]

Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, 
New York, NY. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
collected from Bronx County, Kings County, New York County, Queens 
County, and Westchester County, NY.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by American 
Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of 
Indians, Oklahoma (now part of the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma); and 
Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin.
    In 1898, human remains representing a minimum of seven individuals 
were collected by Raymond M. Harrington from Croton Neck, Croton-on-
Hudson, Westchester County, NY. In 1899, the human remains were 
acquired by the museum as a gift from William R. Warren. No known 
individuals were identified. The 20 associated funerary objects are 2 
oyster shells, 14 paintstone fragments, 3 chert pebbles, and 1 clay 
smoking pipe, which dates to the late 17th or early 18th century and is 
apparently of British manufacture.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the presence of items of Native American manufacture. Flexed burials 
and the relative scarcity of funerary objects are consistent with Late 
Woodland period burial practices. Geographic location is consistent 
with the traditional and postcontact territory of the ``Kitchawonck,'' 
a Munsee Delaware Indian group.
    In 1899, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals 
were collected by M. Raymond Harrington from the south shore of Le Roy 
Bay, Pelham Bay Park, Bronx County, NY, during an expedition sponsored 
by the American Museum of Natural History. No known individuals were 
identified. The 14 associated funerary objects are 4 shell pieces, 5 
stone chips, 2 pottery sherds, 1 stone scraper, 1 mica ornament, and 1 
piece of elk bone.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the presence of a large Native American habitation site and the 
presence of items of Native American manufacture. The human remains 
recovered from the Le Roy Bay site are considered to date to the Late 
Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent 
with the traditional and post-contact territory of the Munsee Delaware 
Indian groups.
    In 1899, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were collected by M. Raymond Harrington from a shell-filled pit on the 
Ryder property, Avenue U vicinity, Marine Park, Kings County, NY, 
during an American Museum of Natural History expedition. The American 
Museum of Natural History acquired the human remains and associated 
funerary objects later that same year as part of this expedition. No 
known individual was identified. The approximately 192 associated 
funerary objects are 1 pipe bowl, 10 shells, 2 bone tools, 10 pottery 
fragments, 12 stone chips, 1 piece of crab claw, 6 turtle shell 
fragments, and a minimum of 150 animal bones.
    The individual has been identified as Native American based on the 
mode of burial and the presence of items of Native American 
manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial context, the human 
remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 
1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and 
postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups.
    Possibly in 1900, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were collected by M. Raymond Harrington, from a camp burial 
site at Avenue U and Ryder's Pond, Marine Park, Kings County, NY. The 
museum acquired the human remains in 1900 as a gift from Mr. Putnam, 
who supported Mr. Harrington's expeditions. No known individual was 
identified. The 111 associated funerary objects are 1 pipe stem; 2 
sinkers; 32 animal, bird, fish, and turtle bones; 5 stone tools; 1 bone 
tool; and 70 hickory shells and charcoal fragments.
    The individual has been identified as Native American based on 
presence of a Native American occupation site and the presence of items 
of Native American manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial 
context, the human remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland 
period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent with the 
traditional and postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian 
groups.
    In 1907, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were collected by Reginald P. Bolton and W.L. Calver from a shell pit 
in Corbet's Garden, 160 feet west of the west side of Cooper Street, 
220 feet south of Hawthorne Street, Inwood, New York County, NY. The 
American Museum of Natural History purchased the human remains and 
associated funerary objects from Mr. Bolton in 1910. No known 
individual was identified. The 194 associated funerary objects are 77 
shell fragments, 32 pottery fragments, and 85 sturgeon scale fragments.
    The individual has been identified as Native American based on the 
mode of burial and the presence of items of Native American 
manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial context, the human 
remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 
1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and 
postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups.
    In 1907 and 1908, human remains representing a minimum of 14 
individuals were collected by Reginald P. Bolton and W.L. Carver from 
Seaman Avenue, Inwood, New York County, NY. The human remains were 
purchased by the museum in 1910. No known individuals were identified. 
The 35 associated funerary objects are 32 oyster shells, 1 stone, 1 
pottery fragment, and 1 stone point.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the presence of a native shell refuse heap and the presence of items of 
Native American manufacture. The site from which the human remains were 
collected has been identified as a Late Woodland to early contact 
period site. Based on the literature, the burial context of the human 
remains, and the lack of associated items from the Historic period, the 
human remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after 
A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and 
postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups.
    In 1939, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were collected by Ralph Solecki from a shell pit at the head of Hawtree 
Creek, an arm of Jamaica Bay, Aquaduct, Queens County, NY. The American 
Museum of Natural History received the human remains from Mr. Solecki 
as a gift in 1947. No known individuals were identified. The two 
associated funerary objects are one oyster shell and one pottery 
fragment.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the mode of burial and the presence of an item of

[[Page 78461]]

Native American manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial 
context of the human remains, the human remains are considered to date 
to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is 
consistent with the traditional and postcontact territory of the Munsee 
Delaware Indian groups.
    In the late 1950s, human remains representing a minimum of 29 
individuals were collected by Mr. E.J. Kaeser from an ossuary at the 
Archery Range site, Pelham Bay Park, Bronx County, NY. The American 
Museum of Natural History received the human remains from Mr. Kaeser as 
a gift in 1967. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the mode of burial and the presence of items of Native American 
manufacture that are listed in the field notes but which are not part 
of the museum's collection. Based on the literature and the burial 
context of the human remains in an ossuary mixed with shell midden 
located on a knoll overlooking Pelham Bay, the human remains are 
considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). 
Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and postcontact 
territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups.
    Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of a minimum of 59 individuals of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural 
History have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), 
the approximately 568 objects described above are reasonably believed 
to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time 
of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, 
officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared 
group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Cherokee 
Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; and Stockbridge-Munsee 
Community, Wisconsin. A cultural affiliation determination with the 
Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma was made prior to the tribe's 
change in status.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Nell Murphy, Director of Cultural Resources, 
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, 
New York, NY 10024-5192,telephone (212) 769-5837, before January 29, 
2007. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects 
to the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; and 
Stockbridge-Munsee Community, Wisconsin may proceed after that date if 
no additional claimants come forward.
    The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying 
the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; and 
Stockbridge-Munsee Community, Wisconsin that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: November 24, 2006.
Sherry Hutt, Manager
National NAGPRA Program
[FR Doc. E6-22343 Filed 12-28-06; 8:45 am]

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