[Federal Register: October 10, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 197)]
[Notices]               
[Page 63154-63156]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr10oc02-92]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service
 
Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains 
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the University of 
Nebraska State Museum, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, and 
in the Control of the U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers, Omaha District, Omaha, NE

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native 
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9, 
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated 
funerary objects

[[Page 63155]]

in the possession of the University of Nebraska State Museum, 
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, and in the control of the 
U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha 
District, Omaha, NE.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The 
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this 
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District 
professional staff and University of Nebraska-Lincoln professional 
staff in consultation with representatives of the Three Affiliated 
Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota.
    In 1956, human remains representing seven individuals were 
excavated by David Baerreis of the University of Wisconsin for the 
Smithsonian River Basin Surveys during legally authorized excavations 
at the Bamble site (39CA6), Campbell County, SD. The repository for 
these materials is the University of Nebraska State Museum, University 
of Nebraska-Lincoln. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological and ethnohistorical evidence, the Bamble 
site has been identified as an earthlodge village site belonging to the 
postcontact Coalescent period (circa A.D. 1675-1780). Archeological 
investigations and ethnohistorical data have shown that sites dating to 
the Coalescent cultural period are ancestral to the Arikara (south) and 
Mandan (north) tribes, today represented by the Three Affiliated Tribes 
of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were 
found by Paul Cooper of the Smithsonian River Basin Surveys during 
legally authorized excavations at the White Swan Mound site (39CH9), 
Charles Mix County, SD, during construction of the Fort Randall dam by 
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District. The repository for 
these materials is the University of Nebraska State Museum, University 
of Nebraska-Lincoln. No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological evidence, the White Swan site has occupation 
components dating to the Woodland period (500 B.C.-A.D. 900) and the 
Coalescent period (A.D. 1400-1780). Archeological investigations and 
ethnohistorical data have shown that sites that are variants of the 
Plains Woodland, Middle Missouri, and Coalescent cultural phases in the 
Middle Missouri subarea of the Great Plains are ancestral to the 
Arikara (south) and Mandan (north) tribes, today represented by the 
Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota.
    In 1962, human remains representing two individuals were excavated 
by P. Holder of the University of Nebraska during legally authorized 
excavations at the Leavenworth site (39CO9), Corson County, SD. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Based on archeological and ethnohistorical evidence, the 
Leavenworth site is an earthlodge village site attributed to the 
Extended Coalescent period (A.D. 1550-1675). Archeological 
investigations and ethnohistorical data have shown that sites that are 
variants of the Plains Woodland, Middle Missouri, and Coalescent 
cultural phases in the Middle Missouri subarea of the Great Plains are 
ancestral to the Arikara (south) and Mandan (north) tribes, today 
represented by the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold 
Reservation, North Dakota.
    In 1969, human remains representing one individual were removed by 
A. Osborn of the University of Nebraska during legally authorized 
excavations at the Norvald site (39CO32), Corson County, SD. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological and ethnohistorical evidence, the Norvald 
site is identified as an earthlodge village and cemetery belonging to 
the Extended Coalescent period (A.D. 1550-1675). On the basis of 
physical anthropological data, the human remains were identified as 
Arikara. Archeological and ethnohistorical data also have shown that 
sites that are variants of the Plains Woodland, Middle Missouri, and 
Coalescent cultural phases in the Middle Missouri subarea of the Great 
Plains are ancestral to the Arikara (south) and Mandan (north) tribes, 
today represented by the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold 
Reservation, North Dakota.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were 
found by an unknown individual on the surface of site 39GR5, near Old 
Fort Randall, on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Fort Randall project 
land in Gregory County, SD. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    The human remains consist of a poorly preserved foot phalange 
collected from the surface of site 39GR5. On the basis of ceramic 
evidence, the site has a component belonging to the Plains Woodland 
period (500 B.C.-A.D. 900). Archeological investigations and 
ethnohistorical data have shown that sites that are variants of the 
Plains Woodland, Middle Missouri, and Coalescent cultural phases in the 
Middle Missouri subarea of the Great Plains are ancestral to the 
Arikara (south) and Mandan (north) tribes, today represented by the 
Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota.
    In 1962, human remains representing one individual were found by 
Warren Caldwell of the Smithsonian River Basin Surveys during legally 
authorized operations at the Medicine Creek Village site (39LM2), Lyman 
County, SD. The repository for these materials is the University of 
Nebraska State Museum, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological and ethnohistorical evidence, the Medicine 
Creek Village site has both Initial period (A.D. 900-1400) and Extended 
Coalescent period (A.D. 1550-1675) components. Archeological 
investigations and ethnohistorical data have shown that sites that are 
variants of the Plains Woodland, Middle Missouri, and Coalescent 
cultural phases in the Middle Missouri subarea of the Great Plains are 
ancestral to the Arikara (south) and Mandan (north) tribes, today 
represented by the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold 
Reservation, North Dakota.
    In 1967, human remains representing one individual were excavated 
by Donald J. Lehmer of the Smithsonian River Basin Surveys during 
legally authorized excavations at site 39LM222, Lyman County, SD. The 
repository for these materials is the University of Nebraska State 
Museum, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological evidence, site 39LM222 is identified as an 
Extended Coalescent period (A.D. 1550-1675) site. Archeological 
investigations and ethnohistorical data have shown that sites that are 
variants of the Plains Woodland, Middle Missouri, and Coalescent 
cultural phases in the Middle Missouri subarea of the Great Plains are 
ancestral to the Arikara (south) and Mandan (north) tribes, today

[[Page 63156]]

represented by the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold 
Reservation, North Dakota.
    Between 1956 and 1962, human remains representing one individual 
were excavated by Robert Stephenson and William Bass of the Smithsonian 
River Basin Surveys during legally authorized excavations at the Sully 
site (39SL4), Sully County, SD. The repository for these materials is 
the University of Nebraska State Museum, University of Nebraska-
Lincoln. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Based on archeological evidence, the Sully site is an earthlodge 
village of the Extended Coalescent period (A.D. 1550-1675). The human 
remains consist of a fragmentary second metatarsal. Archeological 
investigations and ethnohistorical data have shown that sites that are 
variants of the Plains Woodland, Middle Missouri, and Coalescent 
cultural phases in the Middle Missouri subarea of the Great Plains are 
ancestral to the Arikara (south) and Mandan (north) tribes, today 
represented by the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold 
Reservation, North Dakota.
    In 1963, human remains representing one individual were excavated 
by J.J. Hoffman of the Smithsonian River Basin Surveys during legally 
authorized excavations at the La Roche site (also known as Over's) 
(39ST9), Stanley County, SD. The repository for these materials is the 
University of Nebraska State Museum, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Based on archeological evidence, the La Roche site contains Plains 
Woodland (500 B.C.-A.D. 900), Initial Middle Missouri (A.D. 900-1400), 
and Extended Coalescent (A.D. 1550-1675) components. Archeological 
investigations and ethnohistorical data have shown that sites that are 
variants of the Plains Woodland, Middle Missouri, and Coalescent 
cultural phases in the Middle Missouri subarea of the Great Plains are 
ancestral to the Arikara (south) and Mandan (north) tribes, today 
represented by the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold 
Reservation, North Dakota.
    Between 1964 to 1966, human remains representing a minimum of four 
individuals were excavated by David T. Jones of the Smithsonian River 
Basin Surveys during legally authorized excavations at the Ketchen site 
(39ST223), Stanley County, SD. The repository for these materials is 
the University of Nebraska State Museum, University of Nebraska-
Lincoln. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Based on archeological evidence, the Ketchen site was occupied 
during the Extended Coalescent period (A.D. 1550-1675). Archeological 
investigations and ethnohistorical data have shown that sites that are 
variants of the Plains Woodland, Middle Missouri, and Coalescent 
cultural phases in the Middle Missouri subarea of the Great Plains are 
ancestral to the Arikara (south) and Mandan (north) tribes, today 
represented by the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold 
Reservation, North Dakota.
    In 1956, human remains representing one individual were excavated 
by David Baerreis of the University of Wisconsin for the Smithsonian 
River Basin Surveys during legally authorized excavations at the Spiry-
Eklo site (39WW3), Walworth County, SD. The repository for these 
materials is the University of Nebraska State Museum, University of 
Nebraska-Lincoln. No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological and ethnohistorical evidence, the Spiry-Eklo 
site is identified as a postcontact Coalescent period (A.D. 1675-1780) 
village. Archeological investigations and ethnohistorical data have 
shown that sites that are variants of the Plains Woodland, Middle 
Missouri, and Coalescent cultural phases in the Middle Missouri subarea 
of the Great Plains are ancestral to the Arikara (south) and Mandan 
(north) tribes, today represented by the Three Affiliated Tribes of the 
Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the U.S. 
Department of Defense, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District 
have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains 
listed above represent the physical remains of 21 individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District also have determined that, 
pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group 
identity that can be reasonably traced between these Native American 
human remains and the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold 
Reservation, North Dakota.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Three Affiliated 
Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota. Representatives 
of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally 
affiliated with these human remains should contact Sandra Barnum, 
Cultural Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, 215 
North 17th Street, Omaha, NE 68102, telephone (402) 221-4895, before 
November 12, 2002. Repatriation of the human remains to the Three 
Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota may 
begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.

    Dated: August 28, 2002
Robert Stearns,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 02-25869 Filed 10-9-02; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-S



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