[Federal Register: January 8, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 5)]
[Notices]
[Page 914]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr08ja02-98]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the U.S.
Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Western
Archeological and Conservation Center, Tucson, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior,
National Park Service, Western Archeological and Conservation Center,
Tucson, AZ.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
National Park Service unit that has control or possession of these
Native American human remains. The Manager, National NAGPRA Program is
not responsible for the determinations within this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary
objects was made by National Park Service professional staff in
consultation with representatives of the Gila River Indian Community of
the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt
River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation,
Arizona; Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni
Reservation, New Mexico. Members of the Ak-Chin Indian Community of the
Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona, were contacted, but did
not attend the consultation meeting and were represented by members of
the Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation,
Arizona.
    In 1959-1960, human remains representing 13 individuals were
recovered from 4 sites during legally authorized excavations under the
direction of National Park Service archeologist Wesley L. Bliss. The
four sites were located along a linear transect through Cibola and
McKinley Counties, NM, and Apache County, AZ, as part of the
Transwestern Pipeline Project. No known individuals were identified.
    Human remains representing two individuals were recovered from the
TRW PPL L-WR-32 site. The three associated funerary objects are a
Puerco black-on-white bowl, and a bowl and sherd of the White Mound
black-on-white ceramic type. Diagnostic artifacts found associated with
the burials indicate that the human remains were buried during the
Basketmaker III-Pueblo I phases (A.D. 500-950).
    Human remains representing nine individuals were recovered from the
TRW PPL L-WR-39 site. The six associated funerary objects are a Gallup
black-on-white pitcher and bowl, Escavada black-on-white pitcher and
bowl, Red Mesa black-on-white duck-shaped pitcher, and a corrugated
style ceramic jar. Diagnostic artifacts found associated with the
burials indicate that the human remains were buried during the Pueblo
II-III phases (A.D. 1100-1300).
    Human remains representing one individual were recovered from the
TRW PPL L-WR-43 site. The one associated funerary object is a Puerco
black-on-red bowl. The diagnostic artifact found associated with the
burials indicates that the human remains were buried during the Pueblo
III phase (A.D. 1250-1300).
    Human remains representing one individual were recovered from the
TRW PPL L-WR-47 site. Osteological documentation of the remains shows
cranial deformation. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Similarities in site architecture, ceramics, and other items
recovered from the sites in Cibola and McKinley Counties, NM, and
Apache County, AZ, indicate a single, socially integrated early group
lasting from the Basketmaker III phase through Pueblo III phase (A.D.
500-1300). The archeological literature refers to this community as a
local variant of the widespread Anasazi cultural tradition. Cranial
deformation is common to many Anasazi remains and is believed to
reflect their widespread use of cradleboards to carry infants. A
combination of less bountiful environment, changes in the social
structure of the community, and drought are believed to have
precipitated rapid migration out of this area in the late 1200s. Most
researchers who have worked in the area have concluded that these
populations moved to Zuni and Acoma. Some of the populations from the
western portion of the area may have moved to Hopi.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, the manager of the
Western Archeological and Conservation Center has determined that,
pursuant to 43 CFR 10 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent
the physical remains of 13 individuals of Native American ancestry. The
manager of the Western Archeological and Conservation Center also has
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the 10 objects listed
above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of a
death rite or ceremony. Lastly, the manager of the Western
Archeological and Conservation Center has determined that, pursuant to
43 CFR 10.2 (e) there is a relationship of shared group identity that
can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and
associated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of
Acoma, New Mexico, Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New
Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Ak-Chin Indian
Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila
River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona;
Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa
Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Salt River Pima-Maricopa
Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O'odham
Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.
Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be
culturally affiliated with these human remains and associated funerary
objects should contact George Teague, Manager, Western Archeological
and Conservation Center, National Park Service, 1415 North 6th Avenue,
Tucson, AZ 85705, telephone (520) 670-6501, extension 235, before
February 7, 2002. Repatriation of the human remains and associated
funerary objects may begin after that date if no additional claimants
come forward.

    Dated: November 30, 2001.
Robert Stearns,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships.
[FR Doc. 02-384 Filed 1-7-02; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-S
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