[Federal Register: November 21, 2001 (Volume 66, Number 225)]
[Notices]
[Page 58521-58522]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr21no01-141]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the Anchorage
Museum of History and Art, Anchorage, AK, and in the Control of the
U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7
Alaska Regional Office, Anchorage, AK

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 433 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Anchorage Museum of History
and Art, Anchorage, AK, and in the control of the U.S. Department of
the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7 Alaska Regional
Office, Anchorage, AK.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2(2). The
determination within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Anchorage
Museum of History and Art and Aleutian/Prifilof Islands Association,
Inc., professional staff in consultation with representatives of the
Native Village of Niolski (IRA) and Chaluka Corporation for the native
village of Nikolski, Umnak Island, Alaska.
    In 1936 or 1938, human remains representing one individual were
collected from a burial cave on Kagamil Island, AK, in what was then
the Aleutian Islands Refuge, and is now the Aleutian Islands Unit of
the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, by Alan C. May, a member
of an authorized Smithsonian Institution expedition to the Aleutian and
Commander Islands the direction of Dr. Ales Hrdicka. Expedition members
often made personal collections after Dr. Hrdlicka selected items for
the Smithsonian collections. In 1983, Mr. May donated the collection to
the Anchorage Museum of History and Art. The human remains and
associated funerary objects from kagamil Island in the Anchorage Museum
of History and Art are associated with a much larger collection of
human remains and funerary objects from Kagamil Island saves assembled
by Dr. Hrdlicka during the 1936 and 1938 expeditions; this larger
collection is in the control of the National Museum of Natural History,
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. No known individual was
identified. The 126 associated funerary objects are 64 basketry
fragments (some include feathers), 2 birdskin garments, I mukluk
fragment, 1 bentwood dish, 3 wooden bowls, 2 wooden container
fragments, 9 unidentified wood items (some include cordage, sinew,
twine, skin, and hair), 4 stone abraders, 1 miniature yo-yo, 26 rapes,
5 lines, 2 grass bundles, 4 fur/skin strips and fur fragments, 1 set of
bird wings, and 1 possible baleen item.
    There are no radiocarbon dates for any of the Kagmail Island cave
collections. The consensus among anthropologists, however, is that the
collections date to the Late Prehistoric period, possibly no earlier
than 500-1000 B.P. The Aleut practice of cave burials existed into the
Protohistoric period in the Aleutian Islands but was not practiced
after circa A.D. 1760, During the Russian and American periods,
explorers, priest and others recorded Aleut knowledge about burial cave
practices and Aleut beliefs about burial sites.
    The present-day Aleut cultural affiliation with prehistoric
populations is evident in the cultural continuity of artifact
assemblage content and artifact form throughout the Aleutian region
since the earliest occupation 8700 B.P. Biological data indicate is
situ development of Palco-Aleuts to Neo-Aleuts after the Aleut-Eskimo
Inguistic stock divergence some 9000 years B.P. Glottochronological
evidence indicates that the Aleut language diverged from Eskimoid
languages between 4000 and 4600 B.P.
    In the 1790s, the Aleut villages of the Islands of the Four
Mountains, which includes Kagamil Island, and Aleut villages of western
Umnak Island were at war. At the end of that conflict, the remaining
villagers from the Islands of the Four Mountains were moved by the
Russian skipper Sarychev to villages in western Umnak Island, During
the 19th century those villages consolidated into

[[Page 58522]]

one village, which is the present-day Nikolski.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service have determined that, pursuant to 433 CFR
10.2(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical
remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also have determined that, pusaunt to 43
CFR 10.2(d)(2), the 126 objects listed above are reasonably believed to
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials
of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have determined that, pursuant to
43 CFR 10.2(e), there is a relationship of shared group identify that
can be reasonably traced between these Native American human remains
and associated funerary objects and the Native Village of Nikolski
(IRA) and Chaluka Corporation.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Aleutian/Priblof
Islands Association, Inc., Native Village of Nikolski (IRA), and
Chaluka Corporation. Repriation of any other Indian tribe that believes
itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains and
associated funerary objects should contact Debra Corbett, U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, 1011 East Tudor Road, Anchorage, AK 99503, telephone
(907) 786-3399, before December 21, 2001. Repatriation of the human
remains and associated funerary objects to the Native Village of
Nikolski (IRA) and Chaluka Corporation may begin after that date if no
additional claimants come forward.

    Dated: October 15, 2001.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships.
[FR Doc. 01-29097 Filed 11-20-01; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-M
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