[Federal Register: September 12, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 177)]
[Notices]
[Page 55044-55045]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr12se00-100]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects from Scott and Dubuque Counties, IA,
and Rock Island County, IL, in the Possession of the Office of the
State Archaeologist, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated
funerary objects in the possession of the Office of State
Archaeologist, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 43 CFR 10.2 (c). The
determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of these Native
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations within this
notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Office
of State Archaeologist, University of Iowa, professional staff in
consultation with representatives of the Sac and Fox Tribe of the
Mississippi in Iowa, Sac and Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and
Nebraska, and the Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma.
    In 1877, human remains representing one individual were excavated
from site 13ST82, Scott County, Iowa, by Rev. J. Gass and other members
of the Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences. The museum associated
with this group is now known as the Putnam Museum, Davenport, IA. In
1993, the human remains were transferred to the Office of the State
Archaeologist Burials Program. No known individuals were identified.
There are no associated funerary objects.
    The Putnam Museum card catalog information identified the remains
as coming from the upper levels of a Woodland-period mound and that
this intrusive burial was associated with ``European artifacts.''
Descriptions of the excavations published in the Proceedings of the
Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences describe this as a 19th century
burial with ``a fire steel, a common clay pipe, a number of shell and
glass beads, and a silver ear ring'' associated with the remains. Based
on historical maps, written historical accounts, archaeological
evidence, and tribal history, the Sac and Fox (Meskwaki) are known to
have had villages in this vicinity during the late 1700's and early
1800's. The artifacts described as found with the remains are
consistent with those associated with the Sac and Fox (Meskwaki). The
current location of the artifacts is unknown.
    In the late 1800's or early 1900's, human remains representing two
individuals were excavated from graves at the Mines of Spain, Dubuque,
Dubuque County, IA, by Richard Herrmann, a local collector. Mr.
Herrmann donated the remains to the Ham House Museum, owned by the
Dubuque County Historical Society, Dubuque, IA. In 1986, the remains
were transferred to the Office of State Archaeologist Burials Program.
No known individuals were identified. There are no associated funerary
objects.
    Mr. Herrmann's notes indicated that these two individuals were from
graves located on a bluff in what is now known as the Mines of Spain,
Dubuque, IA. Mr. Herrmann participated in the removal and reburial of
the remains of what were purported to be Julien Dubuque (Hodges 1994),
and he collected the remains of a woman from a grave outside of the
presumed grave of Mr. Dubuque and Chief Peosta. Mr. Herrmann identified
the woman as ``Potosa,'' also known as Ms. Potosi, the purported wife
of Mr. Dubuque. Historical records do not provide any information on
Ms. Potosi, and it is not known when she died, how old she was when she
died, the cause of her death, or even if the remains in this collection
are those of ``Potosa.'' The remains of a second individual were taken
from a grave 60 feet west of the purported Dubuque/Peosta grave. A tag
written by Mr. Herrmann identifies these remains as ``Kettle Chief.''
Given that none of the graves was marked, that they were excavated at
least 75 to 100 years after the deaths of the named individuals, and
the stated rationale for Mr. Herrmann's purported identification is
suspect, the remains of these individuals cannot be identified with
certainty. Physical anthropological evidence indicates that these two
individuals are Native American. Historical maps, written historical
accounts, archeological evidence, and tribal history demonstrate that
the Meskwaki had a village at this location in the late 1700's and
early 1800's and that Julien Dubuque lived and died in

[[Page 55045]]

the area while mining lead on his large land grant named Mines of
Spain.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing two individuals were
removed by Bud Hansen, a local collector, reportedly from the Saukenauk
site (11RI29), Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL. In 1987, the
remains were transferred to the Office of State Archaeologist Burial
Program from a private collection. Saukenauk was an important Sac and
Meskwaki village between 1764 and 1830, which has been documented by
oral historical, archival, and anthropological evidence. No known
individuals were identified. There are no associated funerary objects.
    Based on the above-mentioned information, officials of the Office
of the State Archaeologist, University of Iowa, have determined that,
pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above
represent the physical remains of five individuals of Native American
ancestry. Also, officials of the Office of the State Archaeologist,
University of Iowa, have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e),
there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably
traced between these Native American human remains and the Sac and Fox
Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa, Sac and Fox Nation of Missouri in
Kansas and Nebraska, and the Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Sac and Fox Tribe of
the Mississippi in Iowa, Sac and Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and
Nebraska, and the Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma. Representatives of
any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated
with these human remains should contact Shirley Schermer, Burials
Program Director, Office of the State Archaeologist, Eastlawn,
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, telephone (319) 384-0732,
before October 12, 2000. Repatriation of the human remains to the Sac
and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa, Sac and Fox Nation of
Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska, and the Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma
may begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.

    Dated: August 23, 2000.
John Robbins,
Assistant Director, Cultural Resources Stewardship and Partnerships
[FR Doc. 00-23384 Filed 9-11-00; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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