[Federal Register: September 28, 1998 (Volume 63, Number 187)]
[Notices]
[Page 51589-51590]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr28se98-75]

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects from New Mexico in the Possession of
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Albuquerque District, Albuquerque, NM

AGENCY: National Park Service

ACTION: Notice

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American

[[Page 51590]]

Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9, of the
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary
objects in the possession of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Albuquerque District, Albuquerque, NM.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Army Corps
of Engineers professional staff in consultation with representatives of
the Pueblo of Cochiti, Pueblo of Santa Clara, Jicarilla Apache Tribe,
Mescalero Apache Tribe, Pueblo of Acoma, Pueblo of Isleta, Pueblo of
Jemez, Pueblo of Laguna, Pueblo of Nambe, Pueblo of Picuris, Pueblo of
Pojoaque, Pueblo of San Felipe, Pueblo of San Ildefonso, Pueblo of San
Juan, Pueblo of Sandia, Pueblo of Santa Ana, Pueblo of Santo Domingo,
Pueblo of Taos, Pueblo of Tesuque, Pueblo of Zia, and Pueblo of Zuni.
    Between 1962-1966, human remains representing 118 individuals were
recovered from the Pueblo del Encierro site (LA 70) during legally
authorized salvage excavations conducted by the School of American
Research. No known individuals were identified. The 100 associated
funerary objects include ceramic sherds, ceramic vessels, lithic
flakes, one mano fragment, matting, and worked bone including two bone
whistles.
    Between 1962-1966, human remains representing 89 individuals were
recovered from the Alfred Herrera site (LA 6455) during legally
authorized salvage excavations conducted by the School of American
Research. No known individuals were identified. The 48 associated
funerary objects include ceramic sherds, a Cieniguilla-glazed ceramic
bowl, a San Clemente glaze polychrome bowl, an Agua Fria bowl, mat
impressions, lithic flakes, and worked bone.
    Between 1962-1966, human remains representing 19 individuals were
recovered from the North Bank site (LA 6462) during legally authorized
salvage excavations conducted by the School of American Research. No
known individuals were identified. The five associated funerary objects
include ceramic sherds and worked bone.
    Between 1962-1966, human remains representing seven individual were
recovered from the Ojito del Canyoncito site (LA 9154) during legally
authorized salvage excavations conducted by the School of American
Research. No known individuals were identified. The three associated
funerary objects are a ceramic sherd and lithic flakes.
    Based on cultural material, skeletal morphology of the human
remains, and architecture, these four sites listed above have been
identified as Middle Rio Grande Puebloan villages occupied between 900-
1500 A.D. Based on skeletal morphology, these human remains have been
identified as Native American. All the human remains from these sites
are identified as Puebloan, and all are believed to be ancestral to
present day Pueblo of Cochiti people based on the archaeological
context of their collection or excavation.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains
of 233 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers have also determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR
10.2 (d)(2), the 156 objects listed above are reasonably believed to
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials
of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have determined that, pursuant to
43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity which
can be reasonably traced between these Native American human remains
and associated funerary objects and the Pueblo of Cochiti.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Pueblo of Cochiti,
Pueblo of Santa Clara, Jicarilla Apache Tribe, Mescalero Apache Tribe,
Pueblo of Acoma, Pueblo of Isleta, Pueblo of Jemez, Pueblo of Laguna,
Pueblo of Nambe, Pueblo of Picuris, Pueblo of Pojoaque, Pueblo of San
Felipe, Pueblo of San Ildefonso, Pueblo of San Juan, Pueblo of Sandia,
Pueblo of Santa Ana, Pueblo of Santo Domingo, Pueblo of Taos, Pueblo of
Tesuque, Pueblo of Zia, and Pueblo of Zuni. Representatives of any
other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated
with these human remains and associated funerary objects should contact
Dr. Ronald Kneebone, Archaeologist, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Albuquerque District, 4101 Jefferson Plaza NE., Albuquerque, NM 87109-
3435; telephone: (505) 342-3355, before October 28, 1998. Repatriation
of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Pueblo of
Cochiti may begin after that date if no additional claimants come
forward.
Dated: September 14, 1998.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 98-25809 Filed 9-25-98; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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