[Federal Register: April 22, 1998 (Volume 63, Number 77)]
[Notices]
[Page 19939-19940]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr22ap98-127]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

REVISION-- Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American
Human Remains, Associated Funerary Objects, and Unassociated Funerary
Objects in the Control of the United States Marine Corps, Department of
the Navy, Honolulu, HI; and in the Possession of the Bernice Pauahi
Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

AGENCY: National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9,
of the completion of an inventory of human remains, associated funerary
objects, and unassociated funerary objects in the control of the United
States Marine Corps, Department of the Navy, Honolulu, HI; and in the
possession of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI. This
notice replaces the Notice of Inventory Completion published February
28, 1994.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by United
States Marine Corps and Bishop Museum professional staff in
consultation with representatives of Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai'i
Nei and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.
    Between 1915 and 1932, prior to Federal control of Tract 1 on
Mokapu, human remains representing five individuals from the Heleloa
sand dunes on the Mokapu peninsula were donated to the Bishop Museum by
unknown donor(s). No known individuals were identified. No associated
funerary objects are present.
    During 1938-1940, prior to Federal control of Tract 3 on Mokapu,
human remains representing 799 individuals were recovered from He'eia
sand dunes on Mokapu, during legally authorized excavations conducted
by Gordon T. Bowles of the University of Hawaii and Kenneth P. Emory of
the Bishop Museum. No known individuals were identified. The 61
associated funerary objects include kupe'e, basalt flakes,

[[Page 19940]]

marine shells, kukui nuts, and the bones of fish, birds, pigs, dogs,
and turtles.
    During 1939-1940, human remains representing 184 individuals were
removed from the Heleloa sand dunes, Mokapu during legally authorized
excavations conducted by Gordon T. Bowles of the University of Hawaii
and Kenneth P. Emory of the Bishop Museum; and donated to the Bishop
Museum. No known individuals were identified. The 13 associated
funerary objects include kupe'e, basalt flakes, marine shells, kukui
nuts, and the bones of fish, birds, pigs, dogs, and turtles.
    In 1942, human remains representing 222 individuals from Mokapu and
other locations on O'ahu were donated to the Bishop Museum by unknown
persons. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary
objects are present.
    In 1957, human remains representing 186 individuals were recovered
from the Heleloa sand dunes, Mokapu, O'ahu during legally authorized
excavations conducted by Robert N. Bowen of the University of Hawaii.
No known individuals were identified. The 42 associated funerary
objects include a dog tooth pendant; basalt flakes; bones of fish, bird
and an unidentified mammal; and a bullet casing.
    In 1975, human remains representing 108 individuals were recovered
during a construction project on Ulupa'u, Mokapu. No known individuals
were identified. The 118 associated funerary objects include kupe'e;
calcite, shell, and whale bone pendants; bone and shell buttons; a
metal ring; ivory beads; bone; glass; metal nails; and metal parts of a
smoking pipe.
    During 1952-1993, human remains representing 78 individuals from
unknown locations were donated to the Bishop Museum from unknown
sources, and curated as ``isolated burials'' within the Mokapu
collection. No known individuals were identified. The 21 associated
funerary objects include basalt flakes; bones of fish, bird, and
mammals; coral; marine shell; and a kukui nut.
    A total of 30 cultural items from the Federal lands of Mokapu
including six pendants, basalt flakes, fish scales, a soil sample,
glass and bone beads, bone buttons, a wood smoking pipe, nails, a
kupe'e, and shell and bone fragments were recovered during the 1938-
1940, 1939-1940, 1957, and 1975 excavations referenced above. Although
not recorded with any specific burials, these cultural items are
consistent with the cultural items associated with human remains.
    Based on skeletal and cranial morphology, dentition, style and type
of associated funerary objects, manner of interments, and recovery
locations, the human remains listed above have been determined to be
Native Hawaiian. In consultation with Native Hawaiian organizations,
the U.S. Marine Corps and the Bishop Museum decided that no attempt
would be made to determine the age of the human remains. The various
ohana, or families, listed below are Native Hawaiian organizations
under 43 CFR 10.2 (a)(3)(I).
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the U.S.
Marine Corps and the Bishop Museum have determined that, pursuant to 43
CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical
remains of a minimum of 1,582 individuals of Native American ancestry.
Officials of the U.S. Marine Corps and the Bishop Museum have also
determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the 251 objects listed
above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the
death rite or ceremony. Officials of the U.S. Marine Corps and the
Bishop Museum have further determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2
(d)(2)(ii), these 30 cultural items are reasonably believed to have
been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death
or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a
preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific
burial site of an Native American individual. Lastly, officials of the
U.S. Marine Corps and the Bishop Museum have determined that, pursuant
to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity
which can be reasonably traced between these Native American human
remains, associated funerary objects, and unassociated funerary objects
and Sam Monet/Fannie L. Moniz Ohana, Nalani Olds Ohana, Terrilee Napuna
Keko'olani-Raymond Ohana, Carloa Manuel Ohana, Eric Po'ohina on his
behalf and on behalf of Huna Research Institute, the Princess Nahoa
Olelo o Kamehameha Society, Ka Ohana O Na Iwi o Mokapu representing Hui
Malama I Na Kupuna o Hawai'i Nei, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Ka
Lahui Hawaii, Gladys Pualoa and the Ko'olauloa Hawaiian Civic Club,
Miriam (Toni) Yardley, Ella Paguyo, Ipolani Tano, and Delilah Ortiz.
    This notice has been sent to Sam Monet/Fannie L. Moniz Ohana,
Nalani Olds Ohana, Terrilee Napuna Keko'olani-Raymond Ohana, Carloa
Manuel Ohana, Eric Po'ohina on his behalf and on behalf of Huna
Research Institute, the Princess Nahoa Olelo o Kamehameha Society, Ka
Ohana O Na Iwi o Mokapu representing Hui Malama I Na Kupuna o Hawai'i
Nei, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Ka Lahui Hawaii, Gladys Pualoa and
the Ko'olauloa Hawaiian Civic Club, Miriam (Toni) Yardley, Ella Paguyo,
Ipolani Tano, and Delilah Ortiz. Representatives of any other Native
Hawaiian organization that believes itself to be culturally affiliated
with these human remains, associated funerary objects, and unassociated
funerary objects should contact Ms. June Cleghorn, Staff Archeologist,
Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, HI 96863-3002; telephone: (808)
257-6920, ext. 230, before May 22, 1998. If no additional claimants
come forward, repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary
objects to Sam Monet/Fannie L. Moniz Ohana, Nalani Olds Ohana, Terrilee
Napuna Keko'olani-Raymond Ohana, Carloa Manuel Ohana, Eric Po'ohina on
his behalf and on behalf of Huna Research Institute, the Princess Nahoa
Olelo o Kamehameha Society, Ka Ohana O Na Iwi o Mokapu representing Hui
Malama I Na Kupuna o Hawai'i Nei, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Ka
Lahui Hawaii, Gladys Pualoa and the Ko'olauloa Hawaiian Civic Club,
Miriam (Toni) Yardley, Ella Paguyo, Ipolani Tano, and Delilah Ortiz may
begin after that date or at such time as the requesting parties agree
upon their disposition or the dispute is otherwise resolved pursuant to
the provisions of NAGPRA or by a court of competent jurisdiction [25
U.S.C. 3005 (e)].
Dated: April 16, 1998.
Veletta Canouts,
Acting Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Deputy Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 98-10646 Filed 4-21-98; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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