[Federal Register: September 26, 1997 (Volume 62, Number 187)]
[Notices]
[Page 50623]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr26se97-117]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains
and Associated Funerary Objects from Nevada in the Control of the
Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forests, United States Forest Service, Elko,
NV

AGENCY: National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C.
3003 (d), of the completion of an inventory of human remains and
associated funerary objects from Nevada in the control of the Humboldt-
Toiyabe National Forests, United States National Forest Service, Elko,
NV.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by U.S. Forest
Service and Nevada State Museum professional staff in consultation with
representatives of the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone, Ely Shoshone
Tribe, Yomba Shoshone Tribe, Duckwater Shoshone Tribe, and the Duck
Valley Shoshone-Paiute Tribes.
    In 1972, human remains representing four individuals were recovered
from site 26EK831 (Itsy Cave) during legally authorized excavations by
Nevada State Museum archeologists. No known individuals were
identified, however, the families of these individuals are known. The
47 associated funerary objects include leather and leather bands, a
rusted key, a uniface and two utilized flakes, cloth and cloth
fragments, a white button, string fragments, braided and twisted plant
material cordage, two clay objects or coprolites, rock with scratches,
pieces of ochre, cloth/paper fragments, Desert Side Notch projectile
point, pot sherds, thread and thread fragment, peeled hardwood arrow
shaft, Eastgate projectile point, animal bones, wood fragments, trimmed
cut stick, buckle and strap, and white canvas and blue denim fragments.
    Based on manner of interment and types of associated funerary
objects, these individuals have been determined to be Native American.
Based on archeological evidence and material culture of the site, site
26EK831 (Itsy Cave) has been identified as a Western Shoshone use and
occupation site from the late precontact period to approximately the
early 20th century. A medicine man, Killhorse Charlie (also known as
Bronco Charlie) informed his niece, Ms. Theresa Temoke before his death
that he had buried relatives at this location. Ms. Evelyn Temoke
Roche', Ms. Theresa Temoke's daughter, has made a claim of lineal
descent for these individuals on behalf of the related families.
    During 1972-1973, human remains representing one individual were
recovered from site 26EK801 (Bronco Charlie Cave) during legally
authorized excavations by Nevada State Museum archeologists. No known
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on material culture including stone artifacts and ceramics
recovered during the excavations, site 26EK801 has several occupations
dating between 700 B.C. into the historic period. Excavation reports
state that Western Shoshone artifacts were found throughout all levels
of the deposits, and the early date for the site is based on a single
projectile point type used between 700 B.C. until the early 19th
century. Based on ceramics, lithics, and pictographs, the primary
occupations of this site have been identified as late precontact
Western Shoshone. Ethnographic reports the area surrounding this site
was densely populated with single family camps and larger Western
Shoshone winter villages. Additional ethnographic evidence indicates
Bronco Charlie Cave is known and was identified as a sacred site by
Killhorse (Bronco) Charlie.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the U.S.
Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1),
the human remains listed above represent the physical remains of five
individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the U.S. Forest
Service have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A),
the 47 objects listed above are reasonably believed to have been placed
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as
part of the death rite or ceremony. Officials of the U.S. Forest
Service have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (b)(1), Ms.
Evelyn Temoke Roche' can trace her ancestry directly and without
interruption by means of the traditional kinship system of the Te-Moak
Tribe of Western Shoshone to the human remains and associated funerary
objects from the Itsy Cave site. Lastly, officials of the U.S. Forest
Service have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is
a relationship of shared group identity which can be reasonably traced
between the Native American human remains from Bronco Charlie Cave and
the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone.
    This notice has been sent to Ms. Evelyn Temoke Roche' and officials
of the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone, Ely Shoshone Tribe, Yomba
Shoshone Tribe, Duckwater Shoshone Tribe, and the Duck Valley Shoshone-
Paiute Tribes. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes
itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains and
associated funerary objects should contact Fred Frampton, NAGPRA
Coordinator, Northeastern Nevada Ecosystem, Humboldt-Toiyabe National
Forests, 2035 Last Chance Road, Elko, NV 89801; telephone: (702) 738-
5171, fax: (702) 778-0299, before October 27, 1997. Repatriation of the
human remains and associated funerary objects to Ms. Evelyn Temoke
Roche' and the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone may begin after that
date if no additional claimants come forward.
Dated: September 22, 1997.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 97-25578 Filed 9-25-97; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

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