• Mount Rushmore, Washington, Jefferson, T. Roosevelt, Lincoln framed by ponderosa pine trees under a bright blue sky.

    Mount Rushmore

    National Memorial South Dakota

Park Planning

Park planning is an integral element in the preservation and enjoyment of national parks across the country. The Mount Rushmore National Memorial management team looks forward to hearing from the public concerning any planning projects happening at the park.

Please check the National Park Service's Park Planning website for more information about planning projects.

 

COMPLETED PLANNING DOCUMENTS

2010 Mountain Pine Beetle Action Plan
A National Park Service Rapid Resource Assessment Team (RRAT) created an action plan to address the Mountain Pine Beetle (MPB) epidemic that is causing ponderosa pine mortality throughout the Black Hills. Working with area agencies, the memorial developed this plan to slow and hopefully mitigate the movement of the pine beetle into the memorial.
Press Release (.pdf)
Mountain Pine Beetle Plan (7.58mb .pdf)

Backcountry Trail Environmental Assessment
Mount Rushmore National Memorial completed an Environmental Assessment in 2009 on a proposed backcountry trail for the park. The approximately 9.8 miles of trail in the proposed system would be constructed in phases along with accompanying visitor comfort stations, information kiosks, and trailheads. The multi-loop trail will encompass the memorial and will provide several shorter sub-loops to allow shorter hikes on the trail and hikes of varying length and difficulty.
Yellow Wolf Trail Environmental Assessment (13.3mb .pdf)
Environmental Assessment Appendix Documents (8.42mb .pdf)
Finding of No Significant Impact (643kb .pdf)

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Mount Rushmore is named after New York City attorney Charles E. Rushmore, who came to the Black Hills in 1884-85 to check legal titles on properties. On returning to Pine Camp he asked Bill Challis the name of this mountain. Bill replied, "Never had a name but from now on we'll call it Rushmore."