• Reenatctors try to stay warm outside soldier huts in Jockey Hollow

    Morristown

    National Historical Park New Jersey

Water Quality

Nature and Science

Flat Rock Water Quality Monitoring Station

(Barton)

The upper watershed location and limited land-use within Morristown National Historical Park generally serve to protect the integrity and quality of the water resources within the Jockey Hollow and New Jersey Brigade units.

While human-related activities outside the park have severely impacted water resources lower in the Great Swamp/ Passaic River watershed. Surface and ground water resources within Morristown National Historical Park generally remain in good condition.

Currently a segment of Primrose Brook (including its Jersey Brook tributary) is designated as FW-2 trout production waters by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.

Indian Grave Brook and a segment of the Passaic River from its source are designated as FW-2 trout maintenance waters.

Primrose Brook is also classified as "Category One (anti-degradation) Waters" by New Jersey Surface Water Quality Standards.

The above mentioned designated waters are to be held to specific parameters and standards of water quality. Long-term impacts of development adjacent to and within the park, as well as run off from local roads might constitute water resource issues that require management attention and appropriate and long term monitoring of the park's water resources. Morristown NHP has implemented a monthly monitoring program in which data is collected at various monitoring stations within the park.

The desired outcomes of the water quality monitoring program at Morristown NHP are: to be able to flag potential degradation resulting from non-point source contamination, to provide a more complete assessment of baseline water quality and to periodically appraise the health of the biological community.

Surface and groundwater samples tested for fecal coli form have found elevated levels of the bacteria. The park will work with the United States Geological Survey to determine possible sources of contamination.

Did You Know?

tea chest

The tea that was thrown into Boston Harbor by the Sons of Liberty in December 1773 was a mixture of Ceylonese and Darjeeling. The same tea can still be purchased from the original blending house, Davison Newsom of London.