The Morning Report

Friday, September 26, 2014

Recent Editions  

INCIDENTS



United States Park Police
Crew Of Eagle Two Makes Two Same-Day Rescues

On September 1st, USPP Lieutenant Simeon Klebaner and Ranger Michelle Schonzeit went hiking on Old Rag Mountain in Shenandoah National Park when they came upon a severely injured hiker.

While attempting to help the hiker out of the backcountry, they became concerned that wet terrain and potential storms would impede them in their efforts and might also cause additional injury to the victim. Klebaner accordingly contacted the Park Police Aviation Unit and asked for a helicopter extrication.

Pilot Officer Evasick and Rescue Technicians Sergeant Tolson and Sergeant Robbins responded in Eagle Two and conducted a hoist rescue of the injured hiker.

Once the injured hiker was safely delivered to the hospital, U.S. Park Police units responded to a call of an injured 12-year-old with a traumatic leg injury on the Billy Goat Trail at Great Falls Park. Eagle Two headed to that location, where they mad another hoist rescue.

The Aviation Unit has completed 16 hoist rescues since this past January, surpassing 2013’s ten hoist rescues conducted throughout the course of the year.

[Submitted by Sergeant Lelani Woods, Public Information Officer]


Gauley River National Recreation Area (WV)
Injured Boaters Evacuated During Gauley Fest Weekend

Rangers responded to a flurry of injured whitewater boaters requesting evacuation from the Gauley River last Saturday morning.

At the time, a number of rangers were already committed to handling the large volume of boater traffic that was headed into the Tailwaters parking area and boat launch. Within a span of about ten minutes, rangers were advised of three injured boaters needing attention.

Off-duty ranger Stan Wilson responded from his nearby residence and coordinated the evacuation of two boaters from the confluence of the Gauley and Meadow Rivers along with members of the Ansted VFD and a local ambulance service.

Both boaters were commercial rafting company customers. One was suffering from a knee injury believed to be a dislocation, and the other was suffering from a probable broken femur. Both injuries were stabilized on site. Wilson then used the parks UTV to transport them to waiting ambulances which took them to local hospitals. A third boater with a minor injury walked out without NPS assistance.

Gauley River rafting season visitation peaked on Saturday, September 20th, during the Gauley Fest weekend, an American Whitewater-sponsored paddling festival believed to be the largest such festival in the world. There are three weekends left in the season, which ends October 19th.

[Submitted by Chuck Noll, Law Enforcement Specialist]


Ozark National Scenic Riverways (MO)
Rangers Respond To Multiple Incidents

Park staff were involved in several incident responses over a three-day period last week, including a technical rescue coordinated by the park’s SAR Team (Ozark NSR Hellbenders) and a boating accident resulting in a fatality. 

Early on the afternoon of September 17th, rangers were notified of the need for a possible rescue in the Blair's Creek area for a 22-year-old man who’d fallen from a cliff. Knowing this area was extremely remote and hard to access, rangers responded with technical rescue equipment.  They attempted to gain additional information while en route to determine if this incident was inside the park, but were only able to determine that the victim was unconscious and located about "100 feet up the hill."  Lack of a specific location and deteriorating weather conditions due to localized heavy rain indicated multiple possibilities for access and extrication of the victim.  Additional rangers with rescue boats, ATVs, and four wheel drive vehicles were dispatched to the area.  

Rangers Chris Figge and Nick Money first arrived on scene and determined the incident was on private property about a quarter mile from the park’s boundary.  The injured man was unconscious and non-responsive. Local first responders and rangers were able to reach him by walking in. Due to the muddy conditions and the treacherous terrain, a decision was made to lower him to the ground (approximately 50 feet below), which could be accessed by vehicles. Responders packaged and lowered him to Reynolds County paramedics, who took over patient care. The man remains hospitalized.

At the time of the incident, a film crew from Animal Planet was on site filming for an upcoming reality TV show called "Emerald Earth" which features "Homesteaders."  They were filming the residents in a privately owned cave.  The victim was climbing the bluff outside the cave when he fell approximately 50 feet. Figge was IC for the incident.

Just after 11 p.m. on September 20th, rangers were notified of a boating accident that had resulted in a drowning of a 74-year-old local man. An off-duty state trooper who was on scene reported that a boat had capsized after hitting a log while gigging (fishing) and that four people were in the water. 

Other giggers and campers attempted to reach the scene, but access was difficult. Twenty minutes passed before they were able to rescue three of the four from the cold waters of the Current River. The fourth person was located on the bottom of the river in a deep hole at the base of a root wad. 

Several attempts were made to recover the victim, but were not successful due to the depth of the water. The first arriving ranger was advised that the victim had been recovered and was being transported by boat a short distance to the Pin Oak Campground. The investigation remains open and is being conducted in cooperation with the Missouri Highway Patrol. Lindel Gregory was the incident commander.

[Submitted by Dawn White]


NEWS AND NOTES



Office of Communications
Tomorrow Is National Public Lands Day

Tomorrow is National Public Lands Day.  The 21st annual event will feature free admission to every National Park Service site, as well as special activities and volunteer work projects across the country.

“National parks and other public lands are the birthright and legacy of all Americans, and as we celebrate these special places on National Public Lands Day, people across the country will come together to join in our efforts to protect and preserve them,” said Director Jarvis. “Whether you come for a visit or to volunteer, I hope that everyone will spend some time enjoying their national parks and public lands on Saturday.”

Sponsored by the National Environmental Education and Training Foundation, National Public Lands Day is the largest single-day, hands-on volunteer effort to improve and enhance federal, state and local public lands in the country. Last year, about 175,000 volunteers worked at 2,237 sites in every state, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico. Visit www.publiclandsday.org for more information and a list of project sites.

Volunteers will lend a hand to help the land at more than 60 national parks. Among the projects, they will walk weed-eating goats at Carl Sandburg National Historic Site, restore wetlands at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, take part in the Yosemite National Park facelift, clean the beach at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, and rehabilitate a campground at Prince William Forest Park. Anyone who volunteers for a National Park Service work project during National Public Lands Day will receive a free pass for a future visit to a national park.

In addition to providing free entrance on Saturday, many parks will host special ranger programs and events, including a star party at Craters of the Moon National Memorial and Preserve, a Fall Fiesta at Bandelier National Monument, the Peanut Festival at Jimmy y Carter National Historic Site, a wilderness fair at Joshua Tree National Park, the Mountain Festival at City of Rocks, and Music and Art in the Mountains at Blue Ridge Parkway.

The following national parks, listed by state, are among those that will host volunteer projects on National Public Lands Day, Saturday, September 27th:

  • Alabama: Little River Canyon National Preserve, Russell Cave National Monument
  • Alaska: Sitka National Historical Park
  • Arizona: Canyon De Chelly National Monument, Grand Canyon National Park, Petrified Forest National Park, Saguaro National Park
  • Arkansas: Arkansas Post National Memorial
  • California: Channel Islands National Park, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, John Muir National Historic Site, Lava Beds National Monument, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, Yosemite National Park
  • Colorado: Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument
  • Connecticut: Weir Farm National Historic Site
  • Delaware: First State National Monument
  • Washington, DC: National Capital Parks- East, National Mall and Memorial Parks
  • Florida: Everglades National Park, Gulf Islands National Seashore
  • Georgia; Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site
  • Hawaii: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
  • Indiana: Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore
  • Maryland: C&O Canal National Historical Park, Monocacy National Battlefield
  • Massachusetts: Minute Man National Historical Park
  • Michigan: Keweenaw National Historical Park, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore
  • Minnesota: Pipestone National Monument
  • Mississippi: Vicksburg National Military Park
  • Missouri: George Washington Carver National Monument
  • Nebraska: Homestead National Monument of America
  • Nevada: Lake Mead National Recreation Area
  • New Hampshire: Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site
  • New Jersey: Patterson Great Falls National Monument
  • New York: Gateway National Recreation Area
  • North Carolina: Cape Lookout National Seashore, Carl Sandburg National Historic Site
  • Ohio: James A. Garfield National Historic Site, William Howard Taft National Historic Site
  • Oklahoma: Chickasaw National Recreation Area
  • Oregon: Oregon Caves National Monument
  • Pennsylvania: Valley Forge National Historical Park
  • Puerto Rico: San Juan National Historic Site
  • South Dakota: Jewell Cave National Monument, Wind Cave National Park
  • Tennessee: Andrew Johnson National Historic Site, Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, Shiloh National Military Park
  • Texas: Big Bend National Park, Padre Island National Seashore
  • Utah: Arches National Park, Cedar Breaks National Monument, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Zion National Park
  • Virginia: Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, George Washington Memorial Parkway, Prince William Forest Park, Shenandoah National Park, Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts
  • Washington: Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, Mount Rainier National Park, San Juan Island National Historical Park
  • Wyoming: Devils Tower National Monument, Yellowstone National Park

[Submitted by Kathy Kupper]

 More Information...
Park Facility Management Division
National Park Service Recognizes Environmental Achievements

The National Park Service (NPS) recently announced the recipients of its 2014 Environmental Achievement Awards honoring outstanding accomplishments in the preservation and protection of park resources. The award recipients have demonstrated exceptional achievements in solid waste reduction, implementation of environmental management systems, energy and water conservation, alternative energy, sustainable buildings, and promotion of climate friendly innovations.


The 2014 winners are:

Dutch Story, Facility Services Assistant, North Cascades National Park, has been a champion of reducing the greenhouse gas footprint of the Stehekin District of the park through his initiatives in source reduction, reuse, and recycling. Through Mr. Story’s initiative and dedication to the principles of sustainability the park lead the way and procured an  electric vehicle to replace a gasoline pick-up truck; the electric vehicle is charged via the on-site hydro power plant and operates virtually emission-free.  Additionally, Mr. Story’s efforts have led to the development of bear-proof barrel and large-scale worm bin composting infrastructure for both the NPS staff and community vermicomposting program. According to current data, the Stehekin District is on track to compost up to 2.5 tons of food waste in FY14. Mr. Story embodies a positive example of how one person’s energy can affect great change, and inspire others not just within the park service, but in our communities at large.

Nathan Wilson, Facility Service Assistant, Fort Smith National Historic Site (FOSM), has played a key leadership role in advancing sustainable management at his park with a special emphasis on energy efficiency and the management of greenhouse gas emissions. Since 2010 Mr. Wilson has spearheaded the effort to phase out the use of incandescent and fluorescent lighting with high efficient LED lighting technology in numerous areas of the park. Mr. Smith was instrumental in developing the parks CFP Plan and helped to develop, coordinate, and present the first virtual CFP workshop to FOSM staff members. Mr. Wilson has also played a key role in developing the park’s Green Purchasing Plan that guides purchase card holders and others procuring goods and services to consider to consider sustainability when making purchases. Mr. Wilson provides a positive lead-by-example attitude and influence that inspires other park employees to achieve greater awareness in sustainability and energy conservation efforts both in the work place and at home.


The NPS CERCLA Response Team, Palmerton Zinc Pile Superfund Site, work tirelessly to guarantee that planned re-vegetation efforts for the Palmerton Zinc Superfund Site, located along the Appalachian Trail in Palmerton, Pennsylvania, were effectively implemented by appropriately addressing risks to human health and the environment while not impeding the mission of the NPS. The NPS Response Team ensured that: a) Re-vegetation efforts were effective on the steep defoliated terrain of the trail; b) Control efforts were in place for invasive plants during the 10-year re-vegetation effort; c) The initiative met an aggressive re-vegetation  performance standard to ensure long term success of native vegetation, and d) The initiative supported the NPS vision of re-establishing and Eastern hardwood forest on the once ravaged landscape.


The Death Valley National Park (DEVA) Management Team demonstrated its resolve to preserve the resources of the park by earning the prestigious International Dark Sky designation for the entire park from the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA). Staff at DEVA recognized that nighttime darkness is among the most important natural resources at the park while also the most fragile of resources. Staff took significant measures to protect the dark sky   included a large-scale effort to replace inefficient lights and poorly designed fixtures throughout the park with energy efficient and lower wattage and lumen lights that are fully shielded from light trespass. In addition to the infrastructural upgrades staff at DEVA created detailed and thoughtful management guidelines , the “Guidance for Outdoor Lighting in Death Valley National Park” to ensure that the safety, security and way finding for park visitors and staff is provided with minimal to no impacts on Death Valley’s dark night sky.

Delaware North Company (DNC), Yellowstone National Park demonstrated its commitment to environmental stewardship through use of its GreenPath® Program as its Environmental Management System to guide its operations.  In FY 2013 DNC took several key actions through the GreenPath program to address the requirements of Executive Order 13514 “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance”. These actions included:

a) A $20,000.00 lighting retrofit at the West Yellowstone Warehouse reducing energy intensity by 30%;
b) Installation of a new solar thermal renewable energy system at the Grant Dormitory which contributed to saving of nearly 400 gallons of propane in 2013;
c) Initiation of a fleet management program (including carpooling, procurement, no-idling policy, optimization of use) which led to a reduction in unleaded fuel use of 1,561 gallons;
d) Reduction of its potable water use through the installation of water efficient fixtures, educational materials, and the elimination of potable water use for landscaping; and
e) Updating its Environmental Preferable Purchasing Policy which directs visitors to products that have a reduced environmental impact through the use of  labels/messaging that include Local, Organic, Environmentally Preferable, Made in the USA, and made of Post-Consumer Content.

Forever Resorts, Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LAKE) built and operated the Marina Services Building (MSB) at the Cottonwood Cove area of the park. The MSB is a 2,009 square-foot floating building connected to a full-service marina facility on the Lake Mohave portion of the Colorado River and it is the first floating building to achieve leadership in energy and environmental design (LEED) certification (Gold) from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The team at Forever Resorts and LAKE took every measure possible to improve the environmental performance of the building, carefully tracking associated data to demonstrate the value of each measure taken. Some of the achievements of the MSB include the following:

a) The MSB was built in on the site of a previously developed marina, which prevented any undeveloped shoreline from being disturbed;
b) New roofing materials were used to reduce the heat island effect in non-roof surfaces by 78% and 100%;
c) Native desert plants from the LAKE native plant nursery were used for landscaping around the building, and were only watered during the initial plant establishment period; and
d) Innovative wastewater technologies including dual-flush toilets, non-water urinals, and the use of non-potable lake water for a sewer conveyance were employed. These measures led to water use reduction of 47.5% over conventional systems.

Mesa Verde National Park (MEVE) used their commitment to sustainability to design and construct a Visitor and Research Center (VRC) consisting of two building components:  the Visitor Information Center and the Research Museum and Collection Facility (Curatorial Facility). Together, they effectively form one building – the VRC. The VRC has been completed as a highly sustainable facility, earning the prestigious LEED Platinum Certification, recognizing exceptional environmental performance.  Significant accomplishments in the building design and operation include reduced potable water use by 40.7%, and an energy reduction of 30% below the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHREA)  90.1 standards. This was accomplished in part through high-efficiency mechanical systems, including a ground loop heat exchanger, a main mechanical plant including a water-to-water heat pump, radiant floor slabs that provide heat (and some cooling) in designated areas, and active chilled beams that provide supplemental cooling. The VRC also features a variety of onsite renewable energy systems, including a 67 kilowatt photovoltaic (PV) array, 64 solar fraction (SF) solar water heating system, and a micro hydro-turbine which produces 25.74% of the total building energy.


The 2014 Honorable Mentions are: 

San Antonio Missions National Historical Park (SAAN) was designated as the first Climate Friendly Park (CFP) in Texas in 2013. This recognition was the culmination of a long history of environmental stewardship at the park. A significant accomplishment at the park that led to the CFP designation included a reduction in fuel usage in 2013 by adding two propane powered trucks, an electric sedan, and an electric utility truck. Nearly half of the park’s fleet is now either propane or electric. Electric vehicle charging stations were installed at the park for NPS and visitor use. Park staff were awarded a Clean Cities grant to host a public event on alternative fueled vehicles. Park staff also concentrated on the results of a recent energy audit to further reduce park energy use by installing over 225 LED lamps throughout the park to replace incandescent bulbs. Water use was also curtailed through the installation of aerators on all faucets. Solid waste was a third area of focus for park staff and the park staff stopped selling any bottled water, and instead installed bottle filling stations in visitor areas.  Using a single-stream recycling service and recycling all tires, wood pallets, and scrap metal allowed park staff to increase the solid waste diversion rate to 65%. New recycling containers were added to high visitor use areas and recycling efforts were expanded at special events.

The Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GOGA) formed a coalition of two national parks, GOGA and Muir Woods National Monument (MUWO) and two community groups convened to expand and publicize the use of electric vehicles in Bay Area parklands. The resulting “Electric Vehicle Partnership” is made of up of staff from GOGA, MUWO, the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy, and the organization Adopt a Charger (AAC). In FY13, the partnership installed two public electric vehicle chargers at MUWO with AAC securing the support of Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) to sponsor the chargers. The Muir Woods project was the second in a partnership between GOGA, the Parks Conservancy, and Adopt a Charger. To take advantage of these new chargers, GOGA added seven electric plug-in vehicles to its fleet.  Through a Clean Cities grant, MUWO purchased five plug-in vehicles. The MUWO public chargers have used 3,011 kWh since they were installed in May 2013 which in about 8,855 miles driven on electricity versus gasoline. According to the NPS Climate Leadership In Parks (CLIP) Tool, 8,855 miles of gasoline would generate 6,959 pounds CO2. Similarly, the plug-in vehicles in the park fleet have driven a combined 20,000 miles in two-plus years, which equates to a savings of 15,000 pounds of CO2.

For more information on these noteworthy achievements, please refer to the Sustainable Operations and Climate Change (SOCC) Program web, available via the “More Information” link below. 

[Submitted by Fred Sturniolo, fred_sturniolo@nps.gov]

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Intermountain Region
Parks Team Up To Assist Veteran

Bighorn Canyon NRA and Little Bighorn Battlefield NM staff collaborated on a successful 9/11 Day of Service and Remembrance Project in Montana. A federally recognized Day of Service and Remembrance, 9/11 is geared towards military families and first-responders. After close consultation by the Crow Tribe, an AmeriCorps VISTA member at Bighorn Canyon performed site visits at five homes recognized by the tribe as possible service projects.

The lucky chosen homeowner, Edward Denny, was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army after serving in Vietnam. Denny lives north of Crow Agency, Montana and his home was in dire need of a good sanding job and a fresh coat of paint.

The project was completed on Monday, September 15th. Twelve volunteers from Bighorn Canyon NRA and Little Bighorn Battlefield NM participated in this project. Denny was very pleased and even moved at one point by the outpouring of support. He went around and was sure to shake hands and thank everyone involved in this undertaking.  Denny and his wife picked out the paint color, and were very happy with the finished product. 

"This project was a win-win situation for all involved," said Bighorn Canyon Lead Ranger Tom Smith. "The homeowner is delighted and extremely grateful that his house got some much needed maintenance that he was otherwise unable to provide due of health issues. This project also turned out to be a great team-building experience for NPS employees from both parks as well. Bottom line, we were able to give thanks to a veteran for his service, and the staff got to give back to the community we live and work.”

Click on link below to view video coverage from the local NBC News.

[Submitted by Tom W. Smith, tom_smith@nps.gov, (406) 666-2582]

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National Capital Region
Gopaul Noojibail To Head National Capital Parks East

Gopaul Noojibail, a 15-year veteran of federal service, has been promoted to superintendent of several national parks in Washington, D.C., administered as National Capital Parks East.

In this role, Noojibail will be responsible for the management and direction of vast urban green spaces, beloved neighborhood parks that date to the L’Enfant Plan and for national parks that honor heroes of American history like Frederick Douglass, Mary McLeod Bethune and Carter G. Woodson.

“Gopaul’s extensive experience in park planning and resource management, particularly in urban national parks, provides a solid foundation for the future of these American treasures,” said acting Regional Director Lisa Mendelson-Ielmini. “His success is built on a collaborative approach to partnerships, a constant eye on shared goals and his ability to bring complex projects to fruition.”

As a first generation Indian American, Noojibail possesses a unique understanding of what national parks can mean to diverse communities and brings an inclusive philosophy to his responsibilities.

“National parks improve people’s lives physically, emotionally and economically. I am eager to continue to work with our neighbors to transform Anacostia Park and the historic homes and to realize the exciting possibilities throughout the community,” Noojibail said. “I am honored to preserve and tell the stories of men and women who changed the course of American history; this is a responsibility I take very seriously.”

Since 2011, Noojibail has served as the deputy superintendent of National Capital Parks East, where he oversaw park operations including resource management, budget, maintenance, and interpretation and education. Previously, he served as deputy chief of planning and compliance at Grand Canyon National Park and chief of resource stewardship and science at Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

Noojibail served as the natural resource program manager for the National Mall & Memorial Parks from 2001-2004. Prior to joining the National Park Service, he was a management analyst in natural resource and environmental issues for the Government Accountability Office from 1999-2001.

Noojibail holds a bachelor’s degree in biology and art from Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana, and a master’s in environmental science and applied ecology from Indiana University. He completed the Leadership Decision Making Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in November 2010.

[Submitted by Jenny Anzelmo-Sarles]


Servicewide
Upcoming Training Calendar

All training offerings – webinars, online courses and training sessions in the field – appear in this listing only, updated each Friday. Entries must be received by midday Thursday at the latest for the following day’s update. Send them to Bill_Halainen@contractor.nps.gov.

All entries must be brief and should have the following:

  • Beginning and ending dates.
  • Name and location of course.
  • A short one- to two-line description.
  • The closing date for application or registration.
  • Name(s) and number(s) for more information.
  • Most importantly, a link to a website where full announcements or detailed information can be found.

New listings and revisions to this week’s calendar are in bold face. They are removed from the calendar once the application deadline has passed.

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Training and Webinars

September 30 – Interactive Webinars: How to Engage Your Audience, 2:00 – 3:15 p.m. ET. This is an Adobe Connect session. Additional sessions will be offered on October 28th and December 4th. Learn how to engage your audience through effective virtual design and delivery, with emphasis on keeping attention & interest. Check out the full description and course objectives at this site in DOI Learn.

September 30 – October 2 – Conference On Preservation And Stewardship Of Historic Places, Yellowstone NP, WY. This conference is for those historic and rustic architecture practitioners who are looking to build new skills and network with professionals and craftspeople in the field. The conference will provide opportunities to learn and exchange ideas through hands-on experiences, classroom presentations and facilitated dialog. Participants can earn up to 16 AIA CEU continuing education credits. The tuition is $395. For more information and to register, go to http://www.preservemontana.org/ynprustic/ .

October 1 – Deadline for proposals for "Engagement, Education, and Expectations: The Future of Parks and Protected Areas," the 2015 George Wright Society Conference on Parks, Protected Areas, and Cultural Sites.  GWS2015 will be held in Oakland, California, from March 29th to April 2nd.  Proposals are being accepted for sessions, papers, poster, and exhibits.  To submit a proposal, go to the conference website at http://www.georgewright.org/gws2015.

October 8 – Your LGBT Co-Workers and Visitors: What They Worry About And How You Can Help, webinar, 2 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Eastern. LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) people have become much more visible in recent years in every walk of life, including our national parks. Yet they can still experience some challenges and have some concerns, both as employees and visitors. In this webinar Shane Snowdon will explore what your LGBT co-workers and visitors worry about--and how you can help them feel welcome. This event is sponsored by the Office of Relevancy, Diversity, and Inclusion.  For more information on the webinar, please contact office_rdi@nps.gov. NPS employees should register online at http://goo.gl/0KGuC8 by October 3rd.  Information on accessing the webcast will be sent to all registrants. Contact the Office of Relevancy, Diversity and Inclusion at 202-354-2203 if you have any questions or concerns. The course coordinator is Sangita Chari (202-354-2203, office_rdi@nps.gov).

October 14 – Moving to the Live Classroom: Setting Up for Success, 2:00 – 3:15 p.m. ET. This is an Adobe Connect session. Discover when and how to successfully use live online learning, with emphasis on preparation for learning success. Check out the full description and course objectives at this site in DOI Learn.

October 20 – October 24 – Heavy Equipment Operator Safety Training, Indiana Dunes, IN. This course will examine the risks of operating heavy equipment and steps required to minimize them. Follow the link above to enroll. Your supervisor must approve the class in DOI Learn. For more information or questions, please contact Sarah Polzin, 301-663-8206 x 115. See the full announcement on the Google Drive.

October 20 – October 24 – Building Tribal and NPS Relationships, Omaha, NE. The objective of this five-day training is to provide participants with the knowledge necessary to develop and conduct effective consultative relationships with American Indian tribes. The process of developing effective consultation requires knowledge and understanding of American Indian culture, history, organizational protocol, relationship building, communication, cultural barriers, conflict resolution, and development of a collaborative environment based on trust and mutual respect. NPS participants will acquire knowledge through interactive lecture, group discussion, and presentations by tribal historic preservation officers, tribal elders, and other experienced tribal members from across the country as they relate their firsthand experiences in consulting with the National Park Service and other federal agencies. Additional training will be provided by consultants Roberta Codero and Anita Dragan of Interpersonal to Intercultural Communication. No tuition. Travel and per diem paid by benefiting account. Apply on-line at DOI Learn. Applicants will be enrolled until the class is full, at which time applicants will be placed on the waiting list. For more information, contact Mark Calamia, Cultural Resources Program Manager and Tribal Liaison, Pipestone National Monument (mark_calamia@nps.gov, 507-825-5464 ext. 216).

October 21 – October 22 - Find 'Em: Initial Response Incident Commander, Estes Park, CO. Learn about the state-of-the-art in missing person search planning. This interactive workshop will introduce the newest and most comprehensive textbook on search and rescue management, focus on the duties and responsibilities of the initial response incident commander, and provide instruction on the use of WinCASIE search incident computer software.  Tuition is $25. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 25 people.

October 22 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Keeping Good People Good, Estes Park, CO. NPS employees begin their careers as passionate, idealistic, enthusiastic people who are often heard saying “I can’t believe they pay me to do this job.” With time, they are exposed to the subtle day-to-day pressures and demands that can be devastating to even the most experienced and capable people. This presentation is aimed at helping the participants develop a personal strategy to prevent the day-to-day pressures from destroying the very things they work so hard to build. They will learn techniques to help create the balance and resilience that is essential for their long-term professional and personal wellbeing. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 22 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Management’s Role in Keeping Good People Good, Estes Park, CO. Organizations spend a significant amount of time, energy and money hiring and training good people, but that is just the beginning. After the hiring process is over, managers have an important role in helping Keep Good People Good. Positive leadership, a proactive approach to problem solving, the “Courage to Communicate,” and holding people respectfully accountable are key to preventing employee-related problems. Managers are responsible for the guidance, mentorship, and coaching that helps employees improve performance and achieve their full potential. This program is aimed at helping managers apply the theories of leadership & management to everyday, real-life situations and develop the practical skills needed to become more effective and confident leaders. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 23 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Communications Skills…They Do Make a Difference, Estes Park, CO. The ability to resolve conflicts, address differences, minimize misunderstandings, interact well with others, work as a team and enhance relationships (of all kinds) is directly related to our ability to communicate. This workshop is designed for people who want to communicate more effectively, build better relationships (at work, home and play), gain a better understanding into the power of perceptions & assumptions, and are looking to have some fun learning practical communication skills they can apply to everyday, real-life situations. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 23 Learning by Listening: Conducting Effective Oral History Interviews, Estes Park, CO. This workshop is a great opportunity to learn about all aspects of oral history. Participants will be introduced to oral history project planning; legal and ethical issues; recording technologies (audio and video); what to do before, during, and after the interview; processing and preserving interviews; and using oral history in Web sites and publications. Participants will conduct and critique a short interview on-site during the workshop. Tuition is $25. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 20 people.

October 28 – Interactive Webinars: How to Engage Your Audience, 2:00 – 3:15 p.m. ET. This is an Adobe Connect session. Learn how to engage your audience through effective virtual design and delivery, with emphasis on keeping attention & interest. Check out the full description and course objectives at this site in DOI Learn.

October 29 – Your LGBT Co-Workers and Visitors: What They Worry About And How You Can Help, webinar, 2 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Eastern. LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) people have become much more visible in recent years in every walk of life, including our national parks. Yet they can still experience some challenges and have some concerns, both as employees and visitors. In this webinar Shane Snowdon will explore what your LGBT co-workers and visitors worry about--and how you can help them feel welcome. This event is sponsored by the Office of Relevancy, Diversity, and Inclusion.  For more information on the webinar, please contact office_rdi@nps.gov. NPS employees should register online at http://goo.gl/0KGuC8 by October 3rd.  Information on accessing the webcast will be sent to all registrants. Contact the Office of Relevancy, Diversity and Inclusion at 202-354-2203 if you have any questions or concerns. The course coordinator is Sangita Chari (202-354-2203, office_rdi@nps.gov).

November 3 – November 14 – Fire Apparatus Driver Operator Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1002 training standards to be qualified as Fire Apparatus Driver Operator. The class is designed to provide persons with the technical information and skills essential for the safe operation and proper maintenance of fire apparatus. Emphasis includes hands-on training of pumping and driving skills critical to support personnel assigned to all hazard response. Personnel will become proficient in troubleshooting, hydraulics, drafting and providing water through multiple pumping evolutions. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. Application deadline is October 6th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

November 4 – November 5 – Remington 870 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington 870 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

November 6 – Moving to the Live Classroom: Setting Up for Success, 2:00 – 3:15 p.m. ET. This is an Adobe Connect session. Discover when and how to successfully use live online learning, with emphasis on preparation for learning success. Check out the full description and course objectives at this site in DOI Learn.

November 6 – November 7– Remington AR15 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington AR15 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

November 17 – November 21 – Interdisciplinary Resource Protection and Law, Southeast Regional Office, Atlanta, GA. This course provides employees with a solid understanding of the resource mission of the NPS and the primary laws, legal authorities, case law interpretation, and policies used to protect park resources. Participants will also receive instruction in the functions and roles that contribute to effective interdisciplinary group work and practice these skills through resource protection case studies. Deadline for application is September 26, 2014. Travel scholarships to help defray costs are available but must be submitted by September 26, 2014. For the full announcement and scholarship application, go to the Natural Resource Stewardship Training webpage. For more information about the course, please contact Jeri Hall, jeri_hall@nps.gov; or Cathy Purchis, cathy_purchis@nps.gov.

November 18 – November 21 – Wildlife Field Anesthesia Training, Fort Collins, CO. Designed for NPS personnel, the class offers instruction on field anesthesia of wildlife.  Topics include regulations on the use of pharmaceuticals in wildlife, physiological effects of drugs, dose calculations, darting equipment, animal and human safety, euthanasia, and establishing a wildlife capture and anesthesia program.  The class will consist of two and a half classroom days, a half day using darting equipment on a shooting range, and a half day participating in a field exercise.  It will start on Tuesday morning and end on Friday at noon. There is no tuition charge, but students are responsible for their own travel and per diem costs. The class size is limited. To register for this class or to find out more, call or email Ryan Monello at 970-568-2492 or Ryan_Monello@nps.gov. The deadline for registration is November 3rd.

December 4 – Interactive Webinars: How to Engage Your Audience, 2:00 – 3:15 p.m. ET. This is an Adobe Connect session. Learn how to engage your audience through effective virtual design and delivery, with emphasis on keeping attention & interest. Check out the full description and course objectives at this site in DOI Learn.

December 8 – December 12 – Fire Officer and Instructor Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class includes certification in both Fire Instructor I and Fire Officer I. These classes have been combined as fire instructor is a required prerequisite for fire officer. The combined class is a combination of online activities with job performance skills being demonstrated in a class or field setting. Fire instructor is designed around classroom lectures, group activities, and individual presentations. Topics include learning theories, use of instructional materials and media, maintaining student records and techniques for effective communication. The fire officer portion of the class focuses on technical knowledge and leadership skills which are essential for command and control of engine company personnel during fire emergencies. Participants will be introduced to the skills of preplanning, fire attack strategies/tactics and logistical support functions. Skills are reinforced and evaluated through dynamic group sessions and video simulations. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules and class assessments. Access to the on-line class is available on December 9th. Application deadline is November 10th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

December 9 – December 12 – Access to Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, VA. This course is ideal for planners, designers, facility managers and accessibility coordinators.  Learners will apply the accessibility standards to new construction and altered recreation facilities (campgrounds, picnic sites, docks, etc); direct project supervision to ensure compliance with the accessibility standards; and apply universal design concepts to benefit the widest spectrum of park users. 

December 9 – December 12 – Wildlife Field Anesthesia Training, Point Reyes National Seashore, CA.  Designed for NPS personnel, the class offers instruction on field anesthesia of wildlife.  Topics include regulations on the use of pharmaceuticals in wildlife, physiological effects of drugs, dose calculations, darting equipment, animal and human safety, euthanasia, and establishing a wildlife capture and anesthesia program.  The class will consist of two and a half classroom days, a half day using darting equipment on a shooting range, and a half day participating in a field exercise.  It will start on Tuesday morning and end on Friday at noon. There is no tuition charge, but students are responsible for their own travel and per diem costs. The class size is limited. To register for this class or to find out more, call or email Ryan Monello at 970-568-2492 or Ryan_Monello@nps.gov. The deadline for registration is November 24th.

January 11 – February 7 – NPS Parkmedic Training Program, Community Regional Medical Center, Fresno, CA. This certification course is designed to take the already proficient EMT/EMT-Basic or EMT-Intermediate 85 or AEMT and increase his/her skills and knowledge to function as an ALS Parkmedic provider in remote and wilderness areas within the national parks. The course will be taught in three sections: classroom (didactic), clinical (hospital), and field internship (pre-hospital). Open to NPS employees who are currently certified as state or national EMT- Basic,  EMT – Intermediate or AEMT, and who are expected to provide advanced life support services within the NPS.  Currently certified AEMT’s who complete this course to transition to the Parkmedic level may opt out of the NREMT certification exam. Clinical and field internship hours will be scheduled individually immediately following this training block. You should expect to stay in Fresno for a minimum of two weeks following the didactic portion of the class to complete the required 50% of your clinical and field experience, which must be done in Fresno.  The remaining 50% may be done in Fresno per your request, but then you should allow an additional one to two weeks, for a total of three to four weeks in Fresno after February 7th.  Alternatively, this final 50% may be done at the ranger's home park/hospital. The tuition is $2,000 if paid before December 8, 2014; $2,300 if paid after December 8, 2014. There is a $300 non-refundable deposit.  Course fee will include a voucher to take the AEMT exam. Nominees must complete and submit a Standard Form 182 (10 Part) to their Training Office. Payment information can be obtained by calling Donna Armijo, UCSF Building at (559) 499-6439.  Application and non-refundable deposit must be received no later than December 8th. For more information, contact Dean Ross, Branch Chief, Emergency Services, (Dean_Ross@nps.gov; 202-513-7093) or Dr. Thomas Kim (tkim@fresno.ucsf.edu), Dr. Christina Umber (cumber@fresno.ucsf.edu), or Donna Armijo (parkmedicprogram@fresno.ucsf.edu, 559-499-6439) in Fresno.

February 10 – February 13 – Access to Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, NV. This course is ideal for planners, designers, facility managers and accessibility coordinators.  Learners will apply the accessibility standards to new construction and altered recreation facilities (campgrounds, picnic sites, docks, etc); direct project supervision to ensure compliance with the accessibility standards; and apply universal design concepts to benefit the widest spectrum of park users. 

February 24 – February 26Divine Disorder; Conference on the Conservation of Folk and Outsider Art, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA. This conference is focused on highlighting the underappreciated decorative works of non-traditional artists. The conservation of these works is vital to preserving the life story of those artists outside the mainstream art community. For more information, go to the event webpage at http://ncptt.nps.gov/blog/divine-disorder-2015/; or contact Jason Church: 318-356-7444 or jason_church@contractor.nps.gov.

March 24 – March 26Fiber Identification and Analysis for Conservation, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Houston, TX. This course covers basic polarized light microscopy (PLM) and methods of sampling, characterization and identification mammalian hair and selected natural and synthetic fibers. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on exercises involving sample preparation and specimen manipulation as well as the characterization and identification of real life specimens. For more information go to the event webpage at http://ncptt.nps.gov/events/fiber-identification-and-analysis-for-conservation/; or contact Jason Church: 318-356-7444 or jason_church@contractor.nps.gov.

April 28 – April 29 – Landscape Preservation: An Introduction, Sitka National Historical Park, Sitka, AK. This training introduces students to the concept of cultural landscapes, including designed, vernacular, and ethnographic landscapes and historic sites.  Student then learn applicable laws and regulations, and discuss how to identify and inventory character-defining features of a landscape. Instructors then explore preservation planning and documentation, and how to develop a cultural landscape report to use in managing historic and cultural landscapes. Case studies illustrate realistic approaches to effective landscape management and preservation. Applications are due by April 14th. Details on the seminar can be found on the National Preservation Institute website (www.npi.org).  For more information, contact Brinnen Carter at 907-747-0140, orBrinnen_Carter@nps.gov.

April 30 – Landscape Preservation: Advanced Tools for Managing Change, Sitka National Historical Park, Sitka, AK. Students will explore issues that direct the process of change and decision-making for challenging landscapes. Instructors will then review the practices of inventorying, evaluating, treating, and maintaining landscape resources and discuss the implications of each, identifying tools and techniques for managing change when difficult issues affect the process. Students should come to understand the philosophical foundations for making sound, educated decisions about preserving and managing historic and cultural landscapes over the long-term. Applications are due by April 14th. Details on the seminar can be found on the National Preservation Institute website (www.npi.org).  For more information, contact Brinnen Carter at 907-747-0140, orBrinnen_Carter@nps.gov.

Online Training

Web Authoring

NPS Basic Web. The basic course covers the topics that web authors need to effectively communicate via NPS websites—both internal and external. The basic course introduces students to web terminology, content strategy, accessibility, writing for the web, image selection/editing, PDF usage, web analytics, web support, and content management system (CMS) basics. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF2013.

NPS Intermediate Web. The intermediate course builds on topics covered in the basic course (above) to give park or program web coordinators (or any interested web author) resources for managing content on NPS websites. The intermediate course goes into more depth about content strategy, web analytics, accessibility, shared content on NPS.gov, and content management system (CMS) elements. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF4017

Natural Resources

Introduction to the Career Academy for Natural Resources. This two-hour on-line training orients learners to the natural resource and science career path within the National Park Service. It explains the role of the natural resource professional within the NPS, and introduces the concepts of ethical conduct, scientific integrity, interdisciplinary networks and building and maintaining professional credibility. Students will address their career development by exploring ways to design and implement professional development plans. Introduction to the Career Academy for Natural Resources is the first unit in the course of study being developed for the Foundational Natural Resource series of the Career Academy for Natural Resources. The Foundational Series is designed to help employees achieve the natural resource competencies at the entry/developmental level. It may also benefit natural resource professionals at any level who are new to the National Park Service. This course is available through DOI Learn. The course code is NPS-NRS1501. Cost: Free. To learn more about the Career Academy for Natural Resources, visit the website at http://www.nps.gov/training/nrs/academy/academy.html. For more information, please contact Jeri Hall, jeri_hall@nps.gov.

Cultural Resources

Nationwide Programmatic Agreement Toolkit. To help guide NPS staff on implementing the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement, which governs Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the NPS has developed a “toolkit.” The toolkit is mandatory training that provides guidance to NPS superintendents and Section 106 coordinators, division chiefs, and facilities staff at region and park levels on using the programmatic agreement during Section 106 review. NPS employees may earn a certificate for their review of the toolkit through DOI Learn by taking a final assessment. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the toolkit website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The toolkit website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/history/howto/PAToolkit/index.htm. For more information about the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement toolkit, please contact: Jeffrey Durbin, NPS Section 106 compliance program officer, at 202-354-1816 or Jeffrey_durbin@nps.gov

Managing Archeological Collections. Learn about caring for archeological collections and help to overcome the curation crisis. The course is designed to assist those who are interested in, or need to learn more about, preserving and managing archeological collections over the long term. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/collections/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Archeology for Interpreters. Through this training, interpreters and anyone with an interest and need to know – including law enforcement rangers, natural resource experts, and managers -- may gain basic knowledge about archeology. The course provides opportunities to learn about archeological methods and analysis and how to encourage concern for the preservation and protection of archeological resources. A park-based case study provides practice. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/AforI/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Interpretation for Archeologists. Archeologists and other resource professionals can take this training to gain a firm foundation in and understanding of the purpose, philosophy, and techniques of interpretation. The course encourages archeologists to frame their work for the public and to work with interpreters to integrate archeological perspectives into interpretive products and tell compelling stories.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/IforA/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Study Tour of Archeological Interpretation. View interpretation with “fresh eyes” to evaluate choices and strategies for interpreting archeology in parks and historic sites. Download worksheets to assist in evaluating both onsite interpretation and virtual visits.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/studytour/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Assessment of Archeological Interpretation. Use the interpretive analysis model to evaluate the effectiveness of interpreting archeological resources on the basis of visitor experience at the levels of short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and audience feedback. Learn more about the National Park Service evaluation strategy. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/aiassess/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Wilderness

The Wilderness Act of 1964. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Writing a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Evaluating a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Deciding to Keep Wilderness Wild: Four Cornerstones for Wilderness Managers. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Stewardship Planning Framework. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Visitor Use Management. A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Strategies, and Monitoring Impacts and Uses.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Natural Resource Management in Wilderness. A suite of twelve courses: Fundamentals, Challenges in Natural Resource Restoration, Monitoring, Evaluating Proposals for Scientific Activity, Fish and Wildlife, Fish and Wildlife Inventory and Monitoring, Threatened and Endangered Species, Air Quality, Soil and Water, Vegetation, Soundscapes, and Night Sky.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Cultural Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this linkfor course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Paleontological Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Retirement

Firefighter/Law Enforcement Officer Retirement Training for Human Resource Specialists, Managers and Supervisors. This course is designed to provide firefighter and law enforcement officer retirement training for human resources specialists, managers and supervisors. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

FERS Retirement Training for Firefighters and Law Enforcement Officers. This course is designed to provide firefighters and law enforcement officers with information on FERS special retirement provisions so that they can manage their careers in such a way that they maximize their benefits. Special retirement provisions apply to employees occupying these positions and they have specific responsibilities that are critical to know about and act upon throughout their careers if they expect to qualify for special retirement. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

Supervision

New Supervisor Development Program. This new training and development program, which was begun last year, is designed specifically for first-time supervisors within the 12 month probationary period of their initial appointment. The New Supervisor Development Program (NSDP) is a blended learning program that is delivered both online and in residential (three day) sessions across the country in collaboration with Bureau of Land Management, and the Fish and Wildlife Service. The online modules (completely free of cost) are available on DOILearn as preliminary work, and include the basics of in knowledge and skills for a first-time supervisor. Completion of these modules is followed by a three day Supervisory Skills Workshop (SSW) that provides synthesis and skills practice. The NSDP satisfies the initial 40-hour new supervisory training required by OPM (5CFR 412.202). There will be no cost to parks and regions in FY 2014 – all costs (tuition and travel) are being funded by WASO Learning and Development. Registrations for the SSW are managed via regional employee development officers by slot allocation.  For more information, please contact Katrina Roberts, NSDP Training Manager, 202-354-1471, or Katherine Callaway, 202-354-1403, or your regional employee development officer.  Additional information can be found at: http://www.nps.gov/training/ - click on Leadership Development Programs.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES



Alaska Region
GS-0193-12/13 Archaeologist

Alaska Regional Office has issued a vacancy announcement for a regional archeologist.

Click on the link below for a copy of the announcement with full details on duties, area information, and procedures for applying.

The announcement closes on October 6th.
 More Information...