The Morning Report

Friday, July 18, 2014

Recent Editions  

INCIDENTS



Arches National Park (UT)
High Temperatures Cause Series Of Heat-Related Emergencies

The park experienced a series of heat-related medical emergencies involving seven visitors and one employee within a period of just over 24 hours last weekend. High temperatures both days were in the 100 to 104 degree range.  Of this total, three were taken by ambulance to a local hospital and a fourth was flown to another hospital in Grand Junction. The remaining four were treated and released.

Just before 2 p.m., on Saturday, July 12th, rangers received a report of a woman having a  heart attack on the Delicate Arch viewpoint trail. The first rangers to arrive were unable to find her on the trail, but were soon flagged down by the occupants of a vehicle near Wolfe Ranch. Two men inside who’d just come off that trail were suffering from heat exhaustion. They were treated by park personnel and Grand County EMS.

Around 8:30 that evening, a report was received of an unconscious man near Delicate Arch. Park, Grand County SAR and Grand County EMS personnel responded, hiking a mile and a half up from the trailhead. The man was treated for heart issues arising from heat stroke throughout the rescue and litter carryout. He was taken to Moab Regional Hospital

EMS incidents resumed the following afternoon when rangers received a report of an unconscious man near Delicate Arch. Park and Grand County personnel again responded, treated the man on scene, and littered him out to the trailhead. He refused further treatment and transportation to the hospital.

While the above rescue was in progress, an interpretive ranger preparing for a guided hike reported coming up an unconscious man in the Fiery Furnace parking lot. The responding ranger found an incoherent man with tingling in his arms and legs. A woman in the car was suffering from severe headache and cramping. Both were taken by ambulance to the hospital.

A third EMS emergency was reported while the above incidents were underway. Around 4:30 p.m., the same ranger who’d called in the above incident was leading the guided hike when a visitor collapsed.  The ranger reported that the woman was unconscious and that she could not obtain a radial pulse. EMS personnel who were still in the Fiery Furnace parking lot headed down the trail. The woman was assessed and found to be suffering from heat stroke. She was flown by helicopter to St. Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction.

Finally, at the conclusion of the Delicate Arch carryout, one member of the park SAR team was treated on scene for heat exhaustion. 

[Submitted by Michael Henry, Supervisory Park Ranger]


Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area (GA)
Rangers Save Three From Drowning In River

Rangers Paul Forward and Chris Calkins and Supervisory Ranger Sean Perchalski were patrolling Diving Rock, one of the park’s busiest areas, on the evening of July 6th when Forward spotted a man in the middle of the river who appeared to be in distress.

The man went under several times as two other visitors struggled to keep him afloat. He then began to pull both of them underwater.

Forward threw them a lifeguard rescue tube and a throw bag, but the people in the water couldn’t reach them. Perchalski then threw a life vest and a second throw bag, which they were able to grab and use to stay afloat. The rangers then pulled all three to shore.

The 22-year-old man who’d originally gotten into trouble was checked out by EMS, but declined further treatment at a medical facility. The other two were extremely fatigued but otherwise okay.

This area has been the scene of several drownings in the past few years by people who’ve tried unsuccessfully to swim across the river. The most recent was on June 9th, when a 24-year-old man drowned while swimming across the river at the same exact location. The river is approximately 175 feet across at this point.

Earlier that day, rangers had discussed what they would do if this exact situation were to occur.

[Submitted by Sean Perchalski, Park Ranger]


Olympic National Park (WA)
Pursuit Through Park Ends With Assault On Deputy

On July 10th, rangers responded to the report of a stolen vehicle about to enter the park from the west peninsula community of Forks, Washington. 

Ranger Art Sandison spotted and pursued the vehicle on Highway 101 along the shores of Lake Crescent. The operator made a panic U-turn in the middle of the road, forced logging trucks and other vehicles off the roadway, and fled back toward Forks at high speeds. 

Shortly after a county deputy joined in the pursuit, the driver pulled over, stopped, and exited the vehicle. He refused to obey commands until the deputy warned him that he would deploy his taser. When they attempted to handcuff him, though, he began to physically resist.

During the ensuing struggle, the deputy’s taser was knocked from his hand and picked up by the man, who attempted to fire it at the deputy. Sandison interceded, using his own taser to subdue the man and take him into custody.

Forks PD, Clallam County SO and the NPS will be charging the man with an assortment of offenses, including theft, first degree assault, attempting to disarm a police officer and resisting arrest.

[Submitted by Mark O’Neill, East District Ranger]


NEWS AND NOTES



Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial (VA)
Major Gift Made To Restore Arlington House

A gift made to the Arlington House through the National Park Foundation yesterday both made history and saved history.

Director Jarvis and National Park Foundation President and CEO Neil Mulholland joined businessman and  philanthropist David M. Rubenstein to announce Rubenstein’s $12.35 million donation, a lead gift in the  National Park Foundation’s Centennial Campaign for America’s National Parks, to restore and improve access to Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial, located within the grounds of Arlington National Cemetery.

The gift complements President Obama’s Centennial Initiative for the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service in 2016, a multi-year effort to invest wisely in the park system’s most important assets, use parks to enhance informal learning, engage volunteers, provide training opportunities to youth and enhance the National Park Service’s ability to leverage partnerships to accomplish its mission.

“Arlington House, originally constructed to memorialize George Washington, tells America’s story from its founding, to the shame of slavery and a nation divided, to a nation again made whole,” Jarvis said. “We are honored by Mr. Rubenstein’s patriotism, his generous gift, and his dedication to the future of America’s treasures. We are eager to start the transformation that his ‘patriotic philanthropy’ will make possible.”

When the projects are completed, visitors will see Arlington House as it was in 1860, with every room restored to its historical appearance. An important aspect of this project is to restore the slave quarters to better represent and tell the stories of the enslaved. Visitors will learn from park rangers and volunteers, or via new mobile and web assets, in addition to audio tours and changing exhibitions. As visitors move between the mansion and the new museum and bookstore, they will pass along accessible paths that stretch through the restored grounds, including heirloom gardens and new trails. People who cannot visit in person will enjoy a more robust experience through virtual tours, complete with detailed displays of the rooms and museum objects.

“I am honored to support the National Park Service’s renovation of historic Arlington House built in honor of George Washington and located on hallowed ground atop Arlington National Cemetery,” said Rubenstein. “I hope that upon its restoration, Arlington House will appropriately remind visitors of America’s rich history and our country’s good fortune to have such a unique site to honor our veterans, especially those who gave the last full measure of devotion on behalf of this nation.”

The National Park Foundation, as the official charity of America’s national parks and nonprofit partner of the NPS received the gift that will make the critical projects at the memorial possible.

Rubenstein has set the tone for a new era of investment in America’s national parks. For 100 years, generous philanthropists have stepped forward to keep the national parks beautiful, vital and accessible.

Rubenstein’s donation is the largest gift associated with the NPF’s Centennial Campaign. In preparation for the milestone anniversary, Director Jarvis has asked the NPF to spearhead and implement the Centennial Public Engagement and National Fundraising Campaigns. Through these efforts, NPS and NPF will celebrate the NPS’s centennial and reintroduce the NPS’s work and opportunities to a new generation of Americans, inviting them to protect America’s special places, working together to connect all people to their parks, and inspiring the next generation of park stewards to visit and get involved with their national parks.

“Mr. Rubenstein’s transformative philanthropic support will not only restore and rejuvenate Arlington House, enlivening it for new audiences, but it also provides an inspiring example of how public-private partnership is vital to ensure these special places thrive,” said Mulholland. “America’s national parks belong to each and every one of us, and, as such, we share the responsibility to protect and preserve them now and for the next generation.”

The residence of Robert E. Lee and his family before the Civil War, the story of Arlington House connects to many important figures, issues and events in American history. Built by George Washington Parke Custis and his slaves between 1802 and 1818, the house and grounds have served many purposes over the last 200 years: a family home for the Lees and Custises, a plantation estate and home to 63 slaves, a monument honoring George Washington, a military headquarters for Union troops, a community for emancipated slaves and a national cemetery. With 650,000 visitors per year, Arlington House is the most visited historic house museum in the national park system.

[Submitted by Jenny Anzelmo-Sarles and Marjorie Hall]


Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division
Clip From Upcoming Film On Value Of Silence Released

A film that will be released next year will feature the work of the Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division at Denali National Park. The film, entitled “In Pursuit Of Silence,” explores the value of silence, our relationship with sound, and the impact of noise on our lives.

"Our senses are constantly under siege, always clinching up in response to a host of stimuli," says director Patrick Shen. "Quiet gives our senses the opportunity to reach outward and be proactive in anchoring our bodies and psyche in the world around us."

The filmmakers' pursuit of silence has taken them around the globe to gather stories and capture what Shen describes as a "consciousness of our sonic environment." As he explains, "we have a growing awareness of the alienating aspects of modern life, and are experiencing a backlash against the increase in the perceptual complexity of our environments."

In their visits to national parks, the filmmakers spent time with soundscape technician Davyd Betchkal and senior NPS scientist Kurt Fristrup, documenting the work of the NPS Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division. The impact of humankind's acoustic footprint on the unique soundscapes of national parks will be an important aspect of the film.

In honor of World Listening Day the filmmakers have released a never-before-seen clip featuring footage they acquired during their visit to Denali last April. In it NPS soundscape technician Davyd Betchkal discusses the importance of listening and its relationship to experiencing a place. Watch here.

For more information about “In Pursuit Of Silence” and to see the trailer visit www.pursuitofsilence.com.

[Submitted by Patrick Shen]

 More Information...
Pacific West Region
David Smith Named Joshua Tree Superintendent

David Smith has been selected as the new superintendent for Joshua Tree National Park in California. Smith is currently the superintendent of Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site in Topeka, Kansas. He will begin his new position in mid-September, replacing former superintendent Mark Butler, who retired earlier this year.

"David’s experience and proven leadership will be a great asset for the park," said Pacific West Regional Director Chris Lehnertz. "His background working in diverse parks with many different types of resources and his proven success in building collaborative relationships both inside and outside government makes him a great fit. It is a bonus that David considers Joshua Tree to be ‘his dream park.’ It is where he signed on as a park volunteer, and in 1998, got his first permanent position with the National Park Service."

During 22 years with the National Park Service, Smith has served as a law enforcement ranger, a park interpreter, and a biological technician in a host of western parks. Before coming to Kansas, he served in Washington, D.C. as legislative staffer on the House Natural Resources Committee as part of the NPS Bevinetto Fellowship program.

Smith arrived in Washington having worked as district naturalist at Grand Canyon National Park, interpretive specialist at the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail, and as a law enforcement ranger at Cabrillo National Monument and Arches and Canyonlands National Parks.

"I grew up climbing and camping in what is one of America’s hidden jewels: Joshua Tree National Park," said Smith. "Helping to lead Joshua Tree in the coming years is an honor. The staff at Joshua Tree are committed to caring for the park and its visitors. They are leaders in environmental education, scientific research, as well as search and rescue, resource protection, and facilities management. I am looking forward to the privilege of working with such an amazing cadre of individuals."

Smith earned a BS in forestry/developmental studies from the University of California, Berkeley as well as an MS in resource interpretation from Texas State/Stephen F Austin University. He is a graduate of the NPS GOAL leadership program and is the national winner of the Freeman Tilden Award for excellence in interpretation. He is also featured in a 2013 TEDx talk on civic engagement and national parks (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZ2nVnleq4o).

Smith grew up in northern San Diego County, California, which is still home to his extended family. He will be joined by his spouse and their two children when he begins his tour of duty in mid-September. Smith’s hobbies include rock climbing and trail running. He is looking forward to finding a local church, maintaining his ties with Rotary and becoming an active member of the greater Joshua Tree National Park area communities. 

United States Park Police
Interagency Effort Focuses On River Safety

On Sunday, July 13th, the United States Park Police, Montgomery County Police, and Maryland Department of Natural Resources combined efforts to participate in river patrols along the Potomac River Gorge.  

Patrols were directed at Lock 6, Billy Goat Trail Section A, Olmsted Island, Difficult Run, and the Cow Hoof Rock area with the primary goal of sharing river safety messages with the public.

Throughout the day, officers encountered visitors hiking in restricted areas as well as illegally swimming and bathing in the river. Officers also assisted two visitors with ankle injuries, often caused by slipping on rocks. 

The primary goal of the joint agency efforts were to collectively educate and inform visitors of the safety precautions and risk factors when disobeying signs of danger.  

[Submitted by Sergeant Lelani Woods, Public Information Officer]


Servicewide
Upcoming Training Calendar

All training offerings – webinars, online courses and training sessions in the field – appear in this listing only, updated each Friday. Entries must be received by midday Thursday at the latest for the following day’s update. Send them to Bill_Halainen@contractor.nps.gov.

All entries must be brief and should have the following:

  • Beginning and ending dates.
  • Name and location of course.
  • A short one- to two-line description.
  • The closing date for application or registration.
  • Name(s) and number(s) for more information.
  • Most importantly, a link to a website where full announcements or detailed information can be found.

New listings and revisions to this week’s calendar are in bold face. They are removed from the calendar once the application deadline has passed.

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Training and Webinars

July 22 – July 23 – NEPA/NHPA Section 106 Workshop:  Intermountain Regional Office, Denver, CO. See full announcement here.  Contact: Cheryl Eckhardt at cheryl_eckhardt@nps.gov or 303-969-2851.

August 5 – August 7 – Compliance with Section 106 and NEPA: Southeast Regional Office. See full announcement here.  Contact: Beth Byrd; beth_byrd@nps.gov or 404-507-5793.

August 20 – August 21 – Sig Sauer Armorer Course, Big Cypress NP, FL. The program content focuses on the mechanical functioning, maintenance, troubleshooting, and field repair of the Sig Sauer law enforcement classic pistol line, including the P220, P226, P228, P229, and P239 pistols. This is a hand’s on program that teaches and guides each participant through all armorer operations, step by step with the instructor. To register online please go to www.sigsaueracademy.com. Click on “Courses,” then “Armorer Courses,” then “Sig Sauger Pistols (Classic),” then “Schedule.” Register for “Ochopee.” You can also register by phone by contacting the academy training coordinator at 603-610-3411. For more information, please contact Luke_Conrad@nps.gov. The tuition is $415. The deadline for applying is August 1st.

August 20 – August 22 – Firearms Instructor Refresher Training, CBP Advanced Training Center, Harpers Ferry, WV. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is July 18th.

August 26 – April 27 – Fundamentals of Section 106: Midwest Region, Minneapolis, MN. See full announcement here.  Contact: Stephen Rogers; stephen_rogers@nps.gov or 402-661-1912.

August 26 – August 28 – Fundamentals of Section 106: Pacific West Region, Fort Vancouver NHS. See full announcement here. Contact: Cari Kreshak; cari_kreshak@nps.gov or 808-228-5334.

September 3 – September 5 – Firearms Instructor Refresher Training, FLETC, Belleville, IL. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is July 23rd.

September 4 – October 9 – Land Management Investigator Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is July 25th.

September 8 – September 11 – NAGPRA in the Parks, webinar. This online course about the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) will provide an overview of NAGPRA and prepare participants to respond to inadvertent discoveries and plan for intentional excavations as prescribed by the law. This is a multiple session course consisting of four two-hour sessions on consecutive days. Detailed information can be found in the full announcement. To register, email mary_carroll@nps.gov by August 27th. Contact: Mary S. Carroll, mary_carroll@nps.gov or 303-969-2300.

September 8 – September 19 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Instructor Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is July 18th.

September 9 – September 10 – Distance Education Technology Transfer Workshop, Cabrillo NM, San Diego, CA. This course is designed to provide end users (interpreters, education specialists, resource managers, fire managers or information technology staff) with the resources and knowledge necessary to assemble a Telexploration backpack and present a real-time distance learning program to a remote audience and to design and deploy a basic wireless systems sufficient to present real-time live Telexploration programs in your park. The closing date for applications is August 15th. For more information on the workshop, go to this web page: http://seatoshiningsea.org/events_New.html. Contact: Amanda Gossard at amanda_gossard@nps.gov.

September 9 – September 11 – Structural Firefighter Recertification and Refresher Course, Grand Canyon NP, AZ. This three-day class satisfies the refresher requirements for NPS Structural Firefighters as outlined in Chapter 12 of Reference Manual 58, NPS Structural Fire Management. The course is designed to refresh the skills, knowledge and competencies of previously certified structural firefighting personnel through the utilization of live fire scenarios. NPS live fire qualified instructors direct the training in compliance with NFPA 1403 and OSHA requirements. Application deadline is August 11th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

September 15 – September 26 – Basic Tactics Instructor Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is July 18th.

September 15 – October 17 – National Search & Rescue Academy, Camp Navajo, Bellemont. AZ. The National Park Service in conjunction with the Department of Defense will conduct this year’s fall session of the National Search & Rescue Academy at Camp Navajo, which is ten miles west of Flagstaff, Arizona. NSARA provides an intensive five-week comprehensive SAR training program for federal employees. This program will provide participants with a venue to efficiently attain basic field rescuer skills in a single condensed format which typically requires several years of career development. This core program provides participants with essential field rescue skills in ground search operations, ICS, swiftwater rescue, technical rope rescue, search management, basic aviation safety, helicopter rescue techniques, and remote/austere EMS techniques. This program is delivered in the classroom and various physically challenging outdoor environments. To broaden interagency cooperation, allied and federal agency personnel will jointly attend this academy. NSARA participants will be housed in shared military barrack style quarters during the training and are required to adhere to all local policies of the hosting facility. On-site lodging and meals during the academy will be provided at no expense to NPS participants. En route travel and per diem costs, as well lodging and meals associated with three days of off-site swiftwater training, will be borne by the benefiting work unit. This is a very physically demanding course and participants are required to perform at an arduous level without physical, mental, or emotional limitations. Participants will be involved in physical fitness training, which will be completed through the Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test, and participants are required to achieve a “First Class PFT Score” by the end of the academy. Prerequisites: In addition to completion of independent study classes on Basic ICS and SAR, candidates must possess a current minimum certification at the First Responder or Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) level. For further information on this training, refer to the announcement and nomination form at this link. Submit completed nomination forms to NSARA Coordinator Ken Phillips, NPS Branch Chief of Search & Rescue, at ken_phillips@nps.gov or 928-606-3862 (cell). Nominations are due by August 15th.

September 16 – September 17 – NEPA/NHPA Section 106 Workshop: Intermountain Region, Grand Canyon NP. See full announcement here.  Contact: Cheryl Eckhardt; cheryl_eckhardt@nps.gov or 303-969-2851.

September 30 – October 3 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Refresher Instructor Training, Yosemite, CA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is August 15th.

September 30 – October 2 – Conference On Preservation And Stewardship Of Historic Places, Yellowstone NP, WY. This conference is for those historic and rustic architecture practitioners who are looking to build new skills and network with professionals and craftspeople in the field. The conference will provide opportunities to learn and exchange ideas through hands-on experiences, classroom presentations and facilitated dialog. Participants can earn up to 16 AIA CEU continuing education credits. The tuition is $395. For more information and to register, go to http://www.preservemontana.org/ynprustic/ .

October 6 – October 10 – Structural Firefighter I (Defensive Firefighter) Course, Gateway NRA (Sandy Hook Unit), NJ. This 40-hour course is designed to provide basic training at the NFPA 1001, Firefighter I level with the minimum skills necessary to function safely and effectively as a member of a structural firefighting team under direct supervision. Course emphasis is on individual and engine company manipulative skills essential for personal safety and efficiency in support of defensive (exterior) operations with limited offensive skills targeting trash and vehicle fires and indirect attacks in the suppression of structural fires. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is September 8th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

October 13 – October 24 – Structural Firefighter I/II Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1001 training standards to be qualified as a Structural Firefighter I and II. Participants will be able to perform both interior and exterior attacks during structural fire events. The course presents students with a strenuous hands-on curriculum that includes extensive training scenarios and live-fire drills. Students will be afforded numerous opportunities to develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed serve as a structural firefighter.  Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is September 15th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

October 20 – October 31 – Use of Force Instructor Training, New Braintree, NM. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is August 28th.

October 21 – October 22 - Find 'Em: Initial Response Incident Commander, Estes Park, CO. Learn about the state-of-the-art in missing person search planning. This interactive workshop will introduce the newest and most comprehensive textbook on search and rescue management, focus on the duties and responsibilities of the initial response incident commander, and provide instruction on the use of WinCASIE search incident computer software.  Tuition is $25. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 25 people.

October 22 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Keeping Good People Good, Estes Park, CO. NPS employees begin their careers as passionate, idealistic, enthusiastic people who are often heard saying “I can’t believe they pay me to do this job.” With time, they are exposed to the subtle day-to-day pressures and demands that can be devastating to even the most experienced and capable people. This presentation is aimed at helping the participants develop a personal strategy to prevent the day-to-day pressures from destroying the very things they work so hard to build. They will learn techniques to help create the balance and resilience that is essential for their long-term professional and personal wellbeing. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 22 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Management’s Role in Keeping Good People Good, Estes Park, CO. Organizations spend a significant amount of time, energy and money hiring and training good people, but that is just the beginning. After the hiring process is over, managers have an important role in helping Keep Good People Good. Positive leadership, a proactive approach to problem solving, the “Courage to Communicate,” and holding people respectfully accountable are key to preventing employee-related problems. Managers are responsible for the guidance, mentorship, and coaching that helps employees improve performance and achieve their full potential. This program is aimed at helping managers apply the theories of leadership & management to everyday, real-life situations and develop the practical skills needed to become more effective and confident leaders. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 23 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Communications Skills…They Do Make a Difference, Estes Park, CO. The ability to resolve conflicts, address differences, minimize misunderstandings, interact well with others, work as a team and enhance relationships (of all kinds) is directly related to our ability to communicate. This workshop is designed for people who want to communicate more effectively, build better relationships (at work, home and play), gain a better understanding into the power of perceptions & assumptions, and are looking to have some fun learning practical communication skills they can apply to everyday, real-life situations. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 23 – Learning by Listening: Conducting Effective Oral History Interviews, Estes Park, CO. This workshop is a great opportunity to learn about all aspects of oral history. Participants will be introduced to oral history project planning; legal and ethical issues; recording technologies (audio and video); what to do before, during, and after the interview; processing and preserving interviews; and using oral history in Web sites and publications. Participants will conduct and critique a short interview on-site during the workshop. Tuition is $25. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 20 people.

November 3 – November 14 – Fire Apparatus Driver Operator Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1002 training standards to be qualified as Fire Apparatus Driver Operator. The class is designed to provide persons with the technical information and skills essential for the safe operation and proper maintenance of fire apparatus. Emphasis includes hands-on training of pumping and driving skills critical to support personnel assigned to all hazard response. Personnel will become proficient in troubleshooting, hydraulics, drafting and providing water through multiple pumping evolutions. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. Application deadline is October 6th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

November 4 – November 5 – Remington 870 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington 870 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

November 6 – November 7– Remington AR15 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington AR15 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

December 8 – December 12 – Fire Officer and Instructor Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class includes certification in both Fire Instructor I and Fire Officer I. These classes have been combined as fire instructor is a required prerequisite for fire officer. The combined class is a combination of online activities with job performance skills being demonstrated in a class or field setting. Fire instructor is designed around classroom lectures, group activities, and individual presentations. Topics include learning theories, use of instructional materials and media, maintaining student records and techniques for effective communication. The fire officer portion of the class focuses on technical knowledge and leadership skills which are essential for command and control of engine company personnel during fire emergencies. Participants will be introduced to the skills of preplanning, fire attack strategies/tactics and logistical support functions. Skills are reinforced and evaluated through dynamic group sessions and video simulations. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules and class assessments. Access to the on-line class is available on December 9th. Application deadline is November 10th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

Online Training

Web Authoring

NPS Basic Web. The basic course covers the topics that web authors need to effectively communicate via NPS websites—both internal and external. The basic course introduces students to web terminology, content strategy, accessibility, writing for the web, image selection/editing, PDF usage, web analytics, web support, and content management system (CMS) basics. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF2013.

NPS Intermediate Web. The intermediate course builds on topics covered in the basic course (above) to give park or program web coordinators (or any interested web author) resources for managing content on NPS websites. The intermediate course goes into more depth about content strategy, web analytics, accessibility, shared content on NPS.gov, and content management system (CMS) elements. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF4017

Cultural Resources

Nationwide Programmatic Agreement Toolkit. To help guide NPS staff on implementing the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement, which governs Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the NPS has developed a “toolkit.” The toolkit is mandatory training that provides guidance to NPS superintendents and Section 106 coordinators, division chiefs, and facilities staff at region and park levels on using the programmatic agreement during Section 106 review. NPS employees may earn a certificate for their review of the toolkit through DOI Learn by taking a final assessment. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the toolkit website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The toolkit website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/history/howto/PAToolkit/index.htm. For more information about the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement toolkit, please contact: Jeffrey Durbin, NPS Section 106 compliance program officer, at 202-354-1816 or Jeffrey_durbin@nps.gov

Managing Archeological Collections. Learn about caring for archeological collections and help to overcome the curation crisis. The course is designed to assist those who are interested in, or need to learn more about, preserving and managing archeological collections over the long term. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/collections/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Archeology for Interpreters. Through this training, interpreters and anyone with an interest and need to know – including law enforcement rangers, natural resource experts, and managers -- may gain basic knowledge about archeology. The course provides opportunities to learn about archeological methods and analysis and how to encourage concern for the preservation and protection of archeological resources. A park-based case study provides practice. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/AforI/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Interpretation for Archeologists. Archeologists and other resource professionals can take this training to gain a firm foundation in and understanding of the purpose, philosophy, and techniques of interpretation. The course encourages archeologists to frame their work for the public and to work with interpreters to integrate archeological perspectives into interpretive products and tell compelling stories.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/IforA/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Study Tour of Archeological Interpretation. View interpretation with “fresh eyes” to evaluate choices and strategies for interpreting archeology in parks and historic sites. Download worksheets to assist in evaluating both onsite interpretation and virtual visits.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/studytour/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Assessment of Archeological Interpretation. Use the interpretive analysis model to evaluate the effectiveness of interpreting archeological resources on the basis of visitor experience at the levels of short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and audience feedback. Learn more about the National Park Service evaluation strategy. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/aiassess/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Wilderness

The Wilderness Act of 1964. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Writing a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Evaluating a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Deciding to Keep Wilderness Wild: Four Cornerstones for Wilderness Managers. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Stewardship Planning Framework. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Visitor Use Management. A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Strategies, and Monitoring Impacts and Uses.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Natural Resource Management in Wilderness. A suite of twelve courses: Fundamentals, Challenges in Natural Resource Restoration, Monitoring, Evaluating Proposals for Scientific Activity, Fish and Wildlife, Fish and Wildlife Inventory and Monitoring, Threatened and Endangered Species, Air Quality, Soil and Water, Vegetation, Soundscapes, and Night Sky.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Cultural Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this linkfor course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Paleontological Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Retirement

Firefighter/Law Enforcement Officer Retirement Training for Human Resource Specialists, Managers and Supervisors. This course is designed to provide firefighter and law enforcement officer retirement training for human resources specialists, managers and supervisors. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

FERS Retirement Training for Firefighters and Law Enforcement Officers. This course is designed to provide firefighters and law enforcement officers with information on FERS special retirement provisions so that they can manage their careers in such a way that they maximize their benefits. Special retirement provisions apply to employees occupying these positions and they have specific responsibilities that are critical to know about and act upon throughout their careers if they expect to qualify for special retirement. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

Supervision

New Supervisor Development Program. This new training and development program, which was begun last year, is designed specifically for first-time supervisors within the 12 month probationary period of their initial appointment. The New Supervisor Development Program (NSDP) is a blended learning program that is delivered both online and in residential (three day) sessions across the country in collaboration with Bureau of Land Management, and the Fish and Wildlife Service. The online modules (completely free of cost) are available on DOILearn as preliminary work, and include the basics of in knowledge and skills for a first-time supervisor. Completion of these modules is followed by a three day Supervisory Skills Workshop (SSW) that provides synthesis and skills practice. The NSDP satisfies the initial 40-hour new supervisory training required by OPM (5CFR 412.202). There will be no cost to parks and regions in FY 2014 – all costs (tuition and travel) are being funded by WASO Learning and Development. Registrations for the SSW are managed via regional employee development officers by slot allocation.  For more information, please contact Katrina Roberts, NSDP Training Manager, 202-354-1471, or Katherine Callaway, 202-354-1403, or your regional employee development officer.  Additional information can be found at: http://www.nps.gov/training/ - click on Leadership Development Programs.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES



Midwest Region
GS-1640-11 Supervisory Facility Operations Specialist

Dates: 07/17/2014 - 07/30/2014

Herbert Hoover National Historic Site is currently recruiting for a supervisory facility operations specialist.  

Click on the link below for a copy of the announcement with full details on duties, area information, and procedures for applying.

It closes on July 30th.

[Submitted by Barb Golden, barbara_golden@nps.gov, 402-661-1642]

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