The Morning Report

Friday, August 15, 2014

Recent Editions  

INCIDENTS



Glacier National Park
Hiker Injured By Falling Boulder

Park personnel responded to a medical emergency along the Continental Divide Trail in the Siyeh area on Sunday, August 10th. 

Two hikers, a father and son from Alabama, were climbing down from Mount Siyeh when a boulder was dislodged. The 21-year-old son avoided the direct impact of the boulder, estimated as weighing about 200 pounds, but received injuries from the glancing blow of the rock and his subsequent 200 foot tumble.  He sustained lacerations to his head and chin, among other injuries.

In an attempt to summon aid, the father waved his arms while yelling. He then fired one gunshot toward a solid surface to indicate that an emergency was occurring.  Nearby hikers reported hearing the gunshot and yelling. One hiker aided the father and son as they began hiking out. 

Park personnel met them on the trail before the junction between Siyeh Pass Trail and Piegan Pass Trail. Two Bear Air hoisted them to West Glacier, where they were picked up by Three Rivers Ambulance and taken to North Valley Hospital in Whitefish.  

[Submitted by Public Affairs Office]


Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (MI)
AED Used To Save Cardiac Arrest Victim

On the afternoon of August 4th, a local dispatch office received a 911 call of a man down with CPR in progress on the face of the Dune Climb. 

Rangers Nate Mazurek, Paul Chalup, Jennifer Langel and Glen Lake Fire Department personnel responded with an ALS ambulance and two utility terrain vehicles (UTVs) to gain access to the top of the dune. 

The victim, a 63-year-old Wisconsin man, was located approximately 100 feet up the face of the first dune.  Langel opened emergency access points for responding fire apparatus and Chalup served as communications relay, Visitor Use Assistant Diana Steele sprinted across the Dune Climb parking lot with an AED housed in the Dune Climb kiosk as Mazurek gathered EMS equipment and prepared to climb to the man’s location, arriving their ten minutes after the first 911 call.

CPR was being performed by a group of bystanders that included two EMTs, a physician, a nurse, a firefighter and an off-duty police officer. The AED was applied and one shock was administered.  As CPR continued, an airway was established and the physician noted a radial pulse separate from the CPR efforts.  Rescue breaths were continued and the man was loaded onto a backboard and transported to the awaiting ambulance at the base of the Dune Climb via UTV.  He was taken to Munson Medical Center in Traverse City, where he underwent surgery and is expected to have a full recovery. 

Quick application of the AED, solid teamwork, strong interagency cooperation and training led to a successful outcome for this visitor.

[Submitted by Phil Akers, Chief Ranger]


Richmond National Battlefield Park (VA)
Rangers Assist With Homicide Investigation

Protection rangers discovered an abandoned, burned minivan cab just outside of the park boundary on Watt House Road in the Gaines Mil unit around 7 a.m. on Saturday, August 9th. A body was discovered inside.

The rangers assisted Hanover County deputies with the ensuing investigation, which revealed that the body was that of 26-year-old James Wells, a taxi cab driver and Navy veteran from Hopewell, Virginia. Wells had received a radio dispatch to pick up a rider in the Mechanicsville area during the late evening hours of Friday, August 8th.

The Hanover County Sheriff’s Department and the Hanover Fire Marshal’s Office are conducting the ongoing investigation.  Local media attention is high.

[Submitted by Tim Mauch, Chief Ranger]


NEWS AND NOTES



Grand Teton National Park (WY)
Luci Johnson Speaks At Wilderness Anniversary Event

Luci Baines Johnson, daughter of Lady Bird and President Lyndon Baines Johnson, served as keynote speaker during a recent celebration to mark the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, signed into law by her father in 1964.

Nearly 350 people gathered on the evening of Friday, August 1st, at Jackson Lake Lodge – with the scenic backdrop of the Teton peaks rising above Jackson Lake – to enjoy live music, light refreshments, and the company of friends, neighbors and park visitors in commemoration of the landmark legislation that established America’s vast wilderness system.

An inspiring, informative and spirited program paid homage to the Wilderness Act of the 1964 that protected 9.1 million acres of pristine, wild lands for future generations and established a conservation legacy that continues to enrich people’s lives in this 21st century.

Grand Teton National Park, with generous support from Grand Teton Association (the park’s partner of 77 years), organized and hosted the recognition event in part to highlight the influence that the Teton landscape played in the genesis of both the Wilderness Society and the Wilderness Act of 1964.

Visionary conservation leaders Olaus and Mardy Murie, Adolph and Louise Murie, Howard Zahniser, Bob Marshall, Aldo Leopold and others gathered often at the Murie Ranch in Grand Teton National Park during the 1950s and 60s to discuss the value of wild lands and develop a strategy for their long-term protection. The Muries opened their home— located in the shadows of the majestic Tetons—to these conservation leaders and they facilitated thoughtful conversations that led to the passage of the Wilderness Act, principally written by Howard Zahniser.

The Muries advanced the lofty ideals of wilderness preservation and their ranch essentially became the western headquarters for the Wilderness Society; furthermore, Olaus served as the first president. Other critical legislation resulted from those important meetings, including the 1977 Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, the greatest preservation act in U.S. history.

That act created new national parks and expanded the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.  For additional information about the Murie family and their historic ranch in Grand Teton National Park, go to http://www.muriecenter.org/.

Superintendent David Vela began the evening program with a hearty welcome and brief recount of how he came to meet and become acquainted with the famous Johnson family while working as a 21-year-old cooperative education student employed by the National Park Service at the Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park, better known as the “Texas White House.”

Years later, Vela served as superintendent at LBJ National Historical Park, where he became close friends with Lady Bird, and her daughters Lynda and Luci, along with other family members.

Through an eye-catching collection of images, Vickie Mates, the park’s chief of interpretation, provided historical context for the Wilderness Act, as well as the significance of the Murie family and their ranch. She explained how wilderness values play a critical role in people’s lives today.

Mates described how just this summer, the wild landscape of Grand Teton National Park has helped wounded warriors find renewed strength by climbing the Grand Teton despite their disabilities, given hope and health to young cancer survivors through a program called The Children’s Grand Adventure, provided healing to service men and women along with their children through a National Military Families Association outdoor program, and inspired artists who came to ‘plein air’ paint the mountains and park wildlife for two weeks in July.

Mates also challenged the audience to think about why wilderness is personally important to them. She concluded with an inspiring video produced by the NPS. Go to http://wilderness.nps.gov/features/wildernessact/popup.html  to view this three-minute video about wilderness.

Luci Johnson delighted the audience with lively stories about her mother, Lady Bird, and her life as the daughter of a larger-than-life U.S. President whose impassioned vision and mission was in his words “to build a great society, a place where the meaning of man’s life matches the marvels of man’s labor.” 

In trying to improve the lives of everyday Americans, President Johnson presided over the passage of the Civil Rights Act and voter rights legislation, the Economic Opportunity Act and anti-poverty legislation, the creation of Job Corps and VISTA, the 1965 Medicare amendment to the Social Security Act and Medicaid, urban renewal and crime prevention, the Highway Beautification Act and the enduring legacy of the Wilderness Act of 1964.

Luci received a standing ovation as she concluded her remarks and challenged the audience to carry on the great programs and work of previous conservationists like the Muries and Stewart Udall, who served as Secretary of the Interior under her father.  Luci told those assembled to “revel in the wonder of nature’s grand symphony.”

“When another generation gathers to celebrate the Centennial of this great act," she asked, “will we be seen as the environment’s heroes?”  

“The opposite of love is not hate . . . and the opposite of life is not death, it’s indifference. The wilderness—the beauty of our environment—is counting on each of us to escape the shackles of indifference.”  

Her final comment was an appeal to act on behalf of wild lands and wild creatures and to heed “the rallying song of the 60s by the Beatles and ‘come together, right now!’”

[Submitted by Jackie Skaggs, Public Affairs Officer]


Bryce Canyon National Park (UT)
Southern Paiute Youth Camp Held

Sixteen middle school Southern Paiute students along with tribal elders participated in the second Kwiyamuntsi (Kwee-YAH-moonts) Youth Camp held on traditional homelands within Cedar Breaks National Monument and the Dixie National Forest. 

The focus of the four-day camp was to connect native youth to their traditional home land, encourage them to continue their education, and to expose the students to potential land management careers. 

Camp Kwiyamuntsi provided students with opportunities to experience the many ways their cultural heritage intersects with current science and resource management activities.  The camp was funded in part by a grant from the National Park Foundation (NPF).  Bryce Canyon National Park and the Bryce Canyon Natural History Association, representing a broad partnership of federal and tribal agencies, were selected by the NPF for its “America’s Best Idea” grant program. 

Kwiyamuntsi Camp is far from the typical summer camp although the youth enjoyed riding mountain bikes, canoeing in Panquitch Lake and hiking in Cedar Breaks National Monument.  What makes this camp unique is the teamwork.  Agency specialists teamed with tribal elders to provide a unique learning experience by blending traditional knowledge with public land management perspectives on hydrology, wildlife, plants, fire, astronomy, geology, orienteering and archeology.    

Campers were treated to hands-on instruction in identifying archeology sites, animal tracks and signs, fish and stream ecology measurements, wildfire management, constellation identification and traditionally used edible plants.  Students gained a greater appreciation for their ancestors’ stewardship of the environment, and how they made use of endemic resources for shelter, clothing, food and to enrich their lives. 

“Our kids that go to these camps have told me that they have enjoyed themselves so much, going camping outdoors and listening to the elders and instructors that they would like to go back the next year,” said Dorena Martineau, cultural specialist with the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah. “To hear the excitement in their voices makes me feel that this is a wonderful thing to have for them and it will always be remembered by the kids that have attended….  Then afterwards having the parents come to you and say ‘Thank you’.”

For many camp participants, it was their first experience to taste traditional foods including buffalo, elk, quail and rabbit.  The students were skeptical at first to try and clean their teeth by chewing on charcoal and were amazed to find how shiny and smooth it made their teeth. 

On the last day of camp the youth heard from American Indian professionals working for the various land management agencies in Southwest Utah, learning about future career opportunities and the various paths that lead them to federal service.  These native leaders expressed the importance of a college education and making wise choices as the students move into high school.

Partnerships are key to the camp’s success and rewarding to all involved. Collaborating in this effort were the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah, Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians and the Moapa Band of Paiutes; Bryce Canyon National Park, Bryce Canyon Natural History Association, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Land Management, Cedar Breaks National Monument, Dixie National Forest, and Southern Utah University. 

[Submitted by Kathleen Gonder, Chief of Interpretation and Visitor Information]


Denver Service Center
Joanne Cody To Retire

After 32 years of federal service, Joanne Cody has announced that she will retire on September 3rd. Joanne is a landscape architect and the landscape architecture, universal design and accessibility technical specialist for Denver Service Center.

Joanne began her career with the National Park Service when she was a landscape architecture student at Penn State University. She was a student intern for Yellowstone National Park in the summers of 1980 and 1981. She recalls that time fondly and all of the interesting projects she was able to be involved in – from designing an accessible trail along the Firehole River, campground renovations, viewshed inventory from the highest points in the park, to counting traffic turning patterns at Old Faithful.

After earning her degree, Joanne accepted a position with DSC on their SE/SW design team.  After the DSC reorganization, she moved into the landscape architecture group.  One of the highlights of her career was working on the restoration of the Giant Forest at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. That project received two awards from the American Society of Landscape Architecture (ASLA), a 2001 Land Stewardship award from the ASLA Colorado Chapter, and a national 2007 Honor Award in General Design.

Joanne moved to the quality assurance group in 2003 as the landscape architecture, universal design and accessibility specialist for the Denver Service Center.  Joanne has long been passionate about making the parks accessible to all visitors, and has enjoyed her role helping parks throughout the system achieve those goals.

“There is no better place for a landscape architect to work than for the National Park Service.  The mission of the NPS to protect the environment while making it usable for people to enjoy so closely aligns with the goals of landscape architecture,” said Joanne.  “I will miss my colleagues at DSC, in the parks, and at architecture/engineering firms.”

While Joanne is retiring from the federal government, she plans to continue her work to make parks accessible through a new position with Meeting the Challenge, Inc., and the Rocky Mountain ADA Center.  In her new role she will provide design assistance, plan reviews and develop self-evaluation and transition plans for national, state, and local parks.

Joanne has requested that any party in her honor be a celebration of all of the accomplishments of the quality assurance group over the past decade to assure projects meet the goals of the NPS.  In that spirit, a celebration will be held Wednesday, August 27th, at Simms Steakhouse in Lakewood, Colorado, from 4 pm to 7 pm.

[Submitted by Lindy Allen, lindy_allen@nps.gov, (303) 969-2588]


President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site (AR)
Youth Leadership Academy Institute Begun

President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site inducted five high school students – Adunola Rachel Osinuga from Camden, Corey Bealer II from Little Rock, Connor Mayes from Texarkana,  Jordan Patterson from North Little Rock, and Tony Spivey from Conway – into its inaugural “Voices of Hope” Youth Leadership Academy Institute.

The students participated in sessions conducted by community members who have devoted their careers to public service, just like President Clinton.

The institute began on Tuesday, August 5th, at Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site, where students met with the site’s Youth Leadership Academy and toured Central High School and the visitor center. The tour was led by Crystal C. Mercer, a daughter of the late civil rights attorney Christopher C. Mercer.  Mercer was one of the Six Pioneers, a group of African-American students who successfully integrated the University of Arkansas School of Law in the years leading up to the Brown v. Board of Education decision of 1954.  

On Wednesday, the students visited the Clinton School of Public Service – the first school in the nation to offer a master of public service degree -- where Alex Thomas, director of enrollment and alumni services, led a discussion on what current social issues the students wanted to change and how the school can provide a great platform for them to be involved in that change after they complete their undergraduate degrees.

Marquis Cooper, a high school counselor at J.A. Fair in Little Rock, led an evening workshop that offered students an interesting perspective on how leadership can take on many forms and paths. Marquis was candid as he revealed his personal story of how he entered public service. 

Coming from a family that didn’t fully understand the value of formal education, Marquis received a low ACT score and was consequently underestimated.  Marquis shared how his frustration and anger at being underestimated fueled his dedication to public service.  He now encourages and inspires students to deeply invest in their education and opportunities such as the Youth Leadership Academy Institute.

On the final day of the institute, students traveled to Arkansas Post National Memorial in Gillett, Arkansas. Students were immersed into a leadership discussion with 40-year National Park Service veteran and Arkansas Post Superintendent Ed Wood.  Park Pathways intern Bethany Henry provided a tour of the grounds and connected the students to the stories of the site and how its early settlers displayed leadership. 

Randi Romo, director of Center for Artistic Revolution “CAR” concluded the institute with the students in a closing circle using varies exercises to expose the students to multiple forms of leadership and help the students to identify the leadership model with which they most closely identify.

The institute was made possible by Youth Partnership Programs.

[Submitted by Christian Davis]


Servicewide
Upcoming Training Calendar

All training offerings – webinars, online courses and training sessions in the field – appear in this listing only, updated each Friday. Entries must be received by midday Thursday at the latest for the following day’s update. Send them to Bill_Halainen@contractor.nps.gov.

All entries must be brief and should have the following:

  • Beginning and ending dates.
  • Name and location of course.
  • A short one- to two-line description.
  • The closing date for application or registration.
  • Name(s) and number(s) for more information.
  • Most importantly, a link to a website where full announcements or detailed information can be found.

New listings and revisions to this week’s calendar are in bold face. They are removed from the calendar once the application deadline has passed.

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Training and Webinars

August 21 – Introduction to Internship Program Evaluation Webinar, 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. EDT. Internships are one of the most important ways that the NPS employs to introduce a younger generation to the tradition of stewardship of our nation’s natural and cultural resources. This webinar is a short introduction to program evaluation for NPS professionals who work with internship programs.  It will provide valuable tools you can use to document the achievements of your program.  A program evaluation identifies, discovers, generates and displays information about an organization's program effectiveness. NPS employees should apply online using DOI Learn. If you do not have access to DOI Learn, email a copy of your SF-182 training form with supervisory approval to Brigitte_Keels@nps.gov or fax to (202) 371-6747 no later than August 14th.  Please submit all questions and concerns regarding this training to the course coordinator: Erica Austin, Program Analyst, WASO Youth Programs, 1201 Eye St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone:  202-513-7177.

August 26 – April 27 – Fundamentals of Section 106: Midwest Region, Minneapolis, MN. See full announcement here.  Contact: Stephen Rogers; stephen_rogers@nps.gov or 402-661-1912.

August 26 – August 28 – Fundamentals of Section 106: Pacific West Region, Fort Vancouver NHS. See full announcement here. Contact: Cari Kreshak; cari_kreshak@nps.gov or 808-228-5334.

August 27 – Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces Webinar: The Bison – Going Beyond The Symbol, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. EDT. For the past year, three associate directorates – Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion; Interpretation, Education, and Volunteers; and Cultural Resources, Partnerships and Science – have been partnering with George Washington University’s Museum Studies department to develop a series of training events open to all NPS employees, partners, and the general public. “Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces” consists of two webinars – the first on August 27th and the second on September 3rd – and a two-day symposium on September 17th and 18th. This first webinar will unpack the symbol of the bison and explore how new collaborations are working to heal the wounds of the past.  Speakers:  Glenn Plumb, Chief Wildlife Biologist, Wildlife Conservation Branch; Reed Robinson, Superintendent, Devils Tower NM; Albert LeBeau, CR Program Manager, Effigy Mounds NM; Jim Stone, Executive Director, Inter Tribal Buffalo Council; Trudy Ecoffey, Tribal Liaison Pine Ridge, Natural Resources Conservation Service, US Department of Agriculture; Keith Aune, Wildlife Conservation Society. NPS employees should register online at http://goo.gl/acITld for individual sessions or the full training event.  Information on accessing the webinars and the webcast will be sent to all registrants. Employees are strongly encouraged to attend the full training event and may receive credit by also enrolling through DOI LEARN no later than August 25th. For more information, go to this link or contact Sangita Chari, Special Assistant to the Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion, National Park Service, Phone:  (202) 354-2203, Email: office_rdi@nps.gov .

September 3 – September 5 – Engineering for Historic Timber Framing Workshop, Natchitoches, LA. The National Center for Preservation Technology and Training is partnering with the Preservation Trades Network, the Association for the Preservation Historic Natchitoches, and the Friends of NCPTT to hold a series of workshop investigating the engineering issues facing historic timber structures. This workshop will bring in preservation engineers, timber framers, site managers, historic building owners, and other parties to discuss best practices for planning and implementing these multi-faceted projects. The focus of these workshops will be African House, which is a 200-year-old, low-fired brick and timber framed building located at Melrose Plantation outside of Natchitoches. For more information or to register please visit the training announcement (http://ncptt.nps.gov/events/engineering-for-historic-timber-framing-workshop) or contact Sarah Marie Jackson atsarah_m_jackson@nps.gov or 318-356-7444.

September 3 – Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces Webinar: Relevancy, Diversity and Inclusion – Expanding National Park Service Narratives, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. EDT. For the past year, three associate directorates – Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion; Interpretation, Education, and Volunteers; and Cultural Resources, Partnerships and Science – have been partnering with George Washington University’s Museum Studies department to develop a series of training events open to all NPS employees, partners, and the general public. “Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces” consists of two webinars – the first on August 27th and the second on September 3rd – and a two-day symposium on September 17th and 18th. This second webinar will focus on diversity. The National Park Service recognizes that America's diversity has given this country its unique strength, resilience, and richness. The Service also recognizes that its greatest promise in the 21st century cannot be achieved unless we improve on our record of including the diversity of the nation in all of the National Park Service's activities. Speakers:  Michael Reynolds, Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy, and Inclusion; Julia Washburn, Associate Director, Interpretation, Education, and Volunteers; Steve Pitti, NPS Advisory Board Member, Professor of History and American Studies, Director of the Program in Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, and Master of Ezra Stiles College at Yale University; Milton Chen, NPS Advisory Board Member, Senior Fellow, The George Lucas Educational Foundation, Edutopia.org & Edutopia video. NPS employees should register online at http://goo.gl/acITld for individual sessions or the full training event.  Information on accessing the webinars and the webcast will be sent to all registrants. Employees are strongly encouraged to attend the full training event and may receive credit by also enrolling through DOI LEARN no later than August 25th. For more information, go to this link or contact Sangita Chari, Special Assistant to the Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion, National Park Service, Phone:  (202) 354-2203, Email: office_rdi@nps.gov .

September 8 – September 11 – NAGPRA in the Parks, webinar. This online course about the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) will provide an overview of NAGPRA and prepare participants to respond to inadvertent discoveries and plan for intentional excavations as prescribed by the law. This is a multiple session course consisting of four two-hour sessions on consecutive days. Detailed information can be found in the full announcement. To register, email mary_carroll@nps.gov by August 27th. Contact: Mary S. Carroll, mary_carroll@nps.gov or 303-969-2300.

September 9 – September 10 – Distance Education Technology Transfer Workshop, Cabrillo NM, San Diego, CA. This course is designed to provide end users (interpreters, education specialists, resource managers, fire managers or information technology staff) with the resources and knowledge necessary to assemble a Telexploration backpack and present a real-time distance learning program to a remote audience and to design and deploy a basic wireless systems sufficient to present real-time live Telexploration programs in your park. The closing date for applications is August 15th. For more information on the workshop, go to this web page: http://seatoshiningsea.org/events_New.html. Contact: Amanda Gossard at amanda_gossard@nps.gov.

September 9 – September 11 – Structural Firefighter Recertification and Refresher Course, Grand Canyon NP, AZ. This three-day class satisfies the refresher requirements for NPS Structural Firefighters as outlined in Chapter 12 of Reference Manual 58, NPS Structural Fire Management. The course is designed to refresh the skills, knowledge and competencies of previously certified structural firefighting personnel through the utilization of live fire scenarios. NPS live fire qualified instructors direct the training in compliance with NFPA 1403 and OSHA requirements. Application deadline is August 11th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

September 15 – October 17 – National Search & Rescue Academy, Camp Navajo, Bellemont. AZ. The National Park Service in conjunction with the Department of Defense will conduct this year’s fall session of the National Search & Rescue Academy at Camp Navajo, which is ten miles west of Flagstaff, Arizona. NSARA provides an intensive five-week comprehensive SAR training program for federal employees. This program will provide participants with a venue to efficiently attain basic field rescuer skills in a single condensed format which typically requires several years of career development. This core program provides participants with essential field rescue skills in ground search operations, ICS, swiftwater rescue, technical rope rescue, search management, basic aviation safety, helicopter rescue techniques, and remote/austere EMS techniques. This program is delivered in the classroom and various physically challenging outdoor environments. To broaden interagency cooperation, allied and federal agency personnel will jointly attend this academy. NSARA participants will be housed in shared military barrack style quarters during the training and are required to adhere to all local policies of the hosting facility. On-site lodging and meals during the academy will be provided at no expense to NPS participants. En route travel and per diem costs, as well lodging and meals associated with three days of off-site swiftwater training, will be borne by the benefiting work unit. This is a very physically demanding course and participants are required to perform at an arduous level without physical, mental, or emotional limitations. Participants will be involved in physical fitness training, which will be completed through the Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test, and participants are required to achieve a “First Class PFT Score” by the end of the academy. Prerequisites: In addition to completion of independent study classes on Basic ICS and SAR, candidates must possess a current minimum certification at the First Responder or Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) level. For further information on this training, refer to the announcement and nomination form at this link. Submit completed nomination forms to NSARA Coordinator Ken Phillips, NPS Branch Chief of Search & Rescue, at ken_phillips@nps.gov or 928-606-3862 (cell). Nominations are due by August 15th.

September 16 – September 17 – NEPA/NHPA Section 106 Workshop: Intermountain Region, Grand Canyon NP. See full announcement here.  Contact: Cheryl Eckhardt; cheryl_eckhardt@nps.gov or 303-969-2851.

September 17 – September 18 – Symposium: Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces. The two-day symposium will create a forum for NPS administrators and interpreters, academics, museum professionals, anthropologists, and public historians from across the country to discuss how the National Park Service can best define and communicate the complex and challenging narratives that comprise the history of the United States. Scheduled panelists include representatives from NPS sites including Fort Smith National Historic Site; Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site; Manzanar; Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site; Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front National Historic Site. Participating museums include the National Museum of the American Indian; US Holocaust Memorial Museum; National Museum of African American History and Culture; Harriet Beecher Stowe Center; and the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. In addition, academics, independent historians, and anthropologists will participate. NPS staff can participate in person or view the two day symposium via a live webcast. NPS employees should register online at http://goo.gl/acITld for individual sessions or the full training event.  Information on accessing the webinars and the webcast will be sent to all registrants. Employees are strongly encouraged to attend the full training event and may receive credit by also enrolling through DOI LEARN no later than August 25th. For more information, go to this link or contact Sangita Chari, Special Assistant to the Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion, National Park Service, Phone:  (202) 354-2203, Email: office_rdi@nps.gov .

September 23 – September 25 Firearms Instructor Refresher Training, Alameda County Sheriff’s Office, Dublin, CA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is August 13th.

September 30 – October 3 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Refresher Instructor Training, Yosemite, CA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is August 15th.

September 30 – October 2 – Conference On Preservation And Stewardship Of Historic Places, Yellowstone NP, WY. This conference is for those historic and rustic architecture practitioners who are looking to build new skills and network with professionals and craftspeople in the field. The conference will provide opportunities to learn and exchange ideas through hands-on experiences, classroom presentations and facilitated dialog. Participants can earn up to 16 AIA CEU continuing education credits. The tuition is $395. For more information and to register, go to http://www.preservemontana.org/ynprustic/ .

October 6 – October 10 – Structural Firefighter I (Defensive Firefighter) Course, Gateway NRA (Sandy Hook Unit), NJ. This 40-hour course is designed to provide basic training at the NFPA 1001, Firefighter I level with the minimum skills necessary to function safely and effectively as a member of a structural firefighting team under direct supervision. Course emphasis is on individual and engine company manipulative skills essential for personal safety and efficiency in support of defensive (exterior) operations with limited offensive skills targeting trash and vehicle fires and indirect attacks in the suppression of structural fires. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is September 8th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

October 13 – October 24 – Structural Firefighter I/II Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1001 training standards to be qualified as a Structural Firefighter I and II. Participants will be able to perform both interior and exterior attacks during structural fire events. The course presents students with a strenuous hands-on curriculum that includes extensive training scenarios and live-fire drills. Students will be afforded numerous opportunities to develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed serve as a structural firefighter.  Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is September 15th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

October 20 – October 31 – Use of Force Instructor Training, New Braintree, MA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is August 28th.

October 21 – October 22 - Find 'Em: Initial Response Incident Commander, Estes Park, CO. Learn about the state-of-the-art in missing person search planning. This interactive workshop will introduce the newest and most comprehensive textbook on search and rescue management, focus on the duties and responsibilities of the initial response incident commander, and provide instruction on the use of WinCASIE search incident computer software.  Tuition is $25. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 25 people.

October 22 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Keeping Good People Good, Estes Park, CO. NPS employees begin their careers as passionate, idealistic, enthusiastic people who are often heard saying “I can’t believe they pay me to do this job.” With time, they are exposed to the subtle day-to-day pressures and demands that can be devastating to even the most experienced and capable people. This presentation is aimed at helping the participants develop a personal strategy to prevent the day-to-day pressures from destroying the very things they work so hard to build. They will learn techniques to help create the balance and resilience that is essential for their long-term professional and personal wellbeing. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 22 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Management’s Role in Keeping Good People Good, Estes Park, CO. Organizations spend a significant amount of time, energy and money hiring and training good people, but that is just the beginning. After the hiring process is over, managers have an important role in helping Keep Good People Good. Positive leadership, a proactive approach to problem solving, the “Courage to Communicate,” and holding people respectfully accountable are key to preventing employee-related problems. Managers are responsible for the guidance, mentorship, and coaching that helps employees improve performance and achieve their full potential. This program is aimed at helping managers apply the theories of leadership & management to everyday, real-life situations and develop the practical skills needed to become more effective and confident leaders. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 23 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Communications Skills…They Do Make a Difference, Estes Park, CO. The ability to resolve conflicts, address differences, minimize misunderstandings, interact well with others, work as a team and enhance relationships (of all kinds) is directly related to our ability to communicate. This workshop is designed for people who want to communicate more effectively, build better relationships (at work, home and play), gain a better understanding into the power of perceptions & assumptions, and are looking to have some fun learning practical communication skills they can apply to everyday, real-life situations. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 23 Learning by Listening: Conducting Effective Oral History Interviews, Estes Park, CO. This workshop is a great opportunity to learn about all aspects of oral history. Participants will be introduced to oral history project planning; legal and ethical issues; recording technologies (audio and video); what to do before, during, and after the interview; processing and preserving interviews; and using oral history in Web sites and publications. Participants will conduct and critique a short interview on-site during the workshop. Tuition is $25. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 20 people.

November 3 – November 14 – Fire Apparatus Driver Operator Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1002 training standards to be qualified as Fire Apparatus Driver Operator. The class is designed to provide persons with the technical information and skills essential for the safe operation and proper maintenance of fire apparatus. Emphasis includes hands-on training of pumping and driving skills critical to support personnel assigned to all hazard response. Personnel will become proficient in troubleshooting, hydraulics, drafting and providing water through multiple pumping evolutions. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. Application deadline is October 6th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

November 4 – November 5 – Remington 870 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington 870 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

November 6 – November 7– Remington AR15 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington AR15 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

December 8 – December 12 – Fire Officer and Instructor Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class includes certification in both Fire Instructor I and Fire Officer I. These classes have been combined as fire instructor is a required prerequisite for fire officer. The combined class is a combination of online activities with job performance skills being demonstrated in a class or field setting. Fire instructor is designed around classroom lectures, group activities, and individual presentations. Topics include learning theories, use of instructional materials and media, maintaining student records and techniques for effective communication. The fire officer portion of the class focuses on technical knowledge and leadership skills which are essential for command and control of engine company personnel during fire emergencies. Participants will be introduced to the skills of preplanning, fire attack strategies/tactics and logistical support functions. Skills are reinforced and evaluated through dynamic group sessions and video simulations. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules and class assessments. Access to the on-line class is available on December 9th. Application deadline is November 10th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

Online Training

Web Authoring

NPS Basic Web. The basic course covers the topics that web authors need to effectively communicate via NPS websites—both internal and external. The basic course introduces students to web terminology, content strategy, accessibility, writing for the web, image selection/editing, PDF usage, web analytics, web support, and content management system (CMS) basics. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF2013.

NPS Intermediate Web. The intermediate course builds on topics covered in the basic course (above) to give park or program web coordinators (or any interested web author) resources for managing content on NPS websites. The intermediate course goes into more depth about content strategy, web analytics, accessibility, shared content on NPS.gov, and content management system (CMS) elements. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF4017

Cultural Resources

Nationwide Programmatic Agreement Toolkit. To help guide NPS staff on implementing the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement, which governs Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the NPS has developed a “toolkit.” The toolkit is mandatory training that provides guidance to NPS superintendents and Section 106 coordinators, division chiefs, and facilities staff at region and park levels on using the programmatic agreement during Section 106 review. NPS employees may earn a certificate for their review of the toolkit through DOI Learn by taking a final assessment. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the toolkit website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The toolkit website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/history/howto/PAToolkit/index.htm. For more information about the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement toolkit, please contact: Jeffrey Durbin, NPS Section 106 compliance program officer, at 202-354-1816 or Jeffrey_durbin@nps.gov

Managing Archeological Collections. Learn about caring for archeological collections and help to overcome the curation crisis. The course is designed to assist those who are interested in, or need to learn more about, preserving and managing archeological collections over the long term. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/collections/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Archeology for Interpreters. Through this training, interpreters and anyone with an interest and need to know – including law enforcement rangers, natural resource experts, and managers -- may gain basic knowledge about archeology. The course provides opportunities to learn about archeological methods and analysis and how to encourage concern for the preservation and protection of archeological resources. A park-based case study provides practice. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/AforI/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Interpretation for Archeologists. Archeologists and other resource professionals can take this training to gain a firm foundation in and understanding of the purpose, philosophy, and techniques of interpretation. The course encourages archeologists to frame their work for the public and to work with interpreters to integrate archeological perspectives into interpretive products and tell compelling stories.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/IforA/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Study Tour of Archeological Interpretation. View interpretation with “fresh eyes” to evaluate choices and strategies for interpreting archeology in parks and historic sites. Download worksheets to assist in evaluating both onsite interpretation and virtual visits.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/studytour/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Assessment of Archeological Interpretation. Use the interpretive analysis model to evaluate the effectiveness of interpreting archeological resources on the basis of visitor experience at the levels of short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and audience feedback. Learn more about the National Park Service evaluation strategy. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/aiassess/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Wilderness

The Wilderness Act of 1964. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Writing a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Evaluating a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Deciding to Keep Wilderness Wild: Four Cornerstones for Wilderness Managers. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Stewardship Planning Framework. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Visitor Use Management. A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Strategies, and Monitoring Impacts and Uses.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Natural Resource Management in Wilderness. A suite of twelve courses: Fundamentals, Challenges in Natural Resource Restoration, Monitoring, Evaluating Proposals for Scientific Activity, Fish and Wildlife, Fish and Wildlife Inventory and Monitoring, Threatened and Endangered Species, Air Quality, Soil and Water, Vegetation, Soundscapes, and Night Sky.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Cultural Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this linkfor course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Paleontological Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Retirement

Firefighter/Law Enforcement Officer Retirement Training for Human Resource Specialists, Managers and Supervisors. This course is designed to provide firefighter and law enforcement officer retirement training for human resources specialists, managers and supervisors. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

FERS Retirement Training for Firefighters and Law Enforcement Officers. This course is designed to provide firefighters and law enforcement officers with information on FERS special retirement provisions so that they can manage their careers in such a way that they maximize their benefits. Special retirement provisions apply to employees occupying these positions and they have specific responsibilities that are critical to know about and act upon throughout their careers if they expect to qualify for special retirement. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

Supervision

New Supervisor Development Program. This new training and development program, which was begun last year, is designed specifically for first-time supervisors within the 12 month probationary period of their initial appointment. The New Supervisor Development Program (NSDP) is a blended learning program that is delivered both online and in residential (three day) sessions across the country in collaboration with Bureau of Land Management, and the Fish and Wildlife Service. The online modules (completely free of cost) are available on DOILearn as preliminary work, and include the basics of in knowledge and skills for a first-time supervisor. Completion of these modules is followed by a three day Supervisory Skills Workshop (SSW) that provides synthesis and skills practice. The NSDP satisfies the initial 40-hour new supervisory training required by OPM (5CFR 412.202). There will be no cost to parks and regions in FY 2014 – all costs (tuition and travel) are being funded by WASO Learning and Development. Registrations for the SSW are managed via regional employee development officers by slot allocation.  For more information, please contact Katrina Roberts, NSDP Training Manager, 202-354-1471, or Katherine Callaway, 202-354-1403, or your regional employee development officer.  Additional information can be found at: http://www.nps.gov/training/ - click on Leadership Development Programs.  

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES



Canyonlands National Park (UT)
GL-0025-9 Protection Rangers (Laterals)

Canyonlands National Park is recruiting for up to two protection rangers interested in lateral reassignments. The rangers selected to fill these positions are duty-stationed in the Needles District, located 50 miles from Monticello, Utah

Requirements:

  • Candidates must possess (or be able to immediately obtain) a Type I NPS law enforcement commission. 

  • Candidates will also be expected to acquire a NWCG Firefighter Type 2 qualification and Basic First Aid certification.                      

The rangers selected will work in a remote wilderness area, performing backcountry patrols via four-wheel drive vehicle, bicycle and foot, and will be responsible for leading and performing resource protection, emergency medical services, search and rescue and wildland fire suppression tasks within the park.

The Needles District is 80 miles from the Canyonlands Headquarters offices in Moab, Utah.  The district contains a vast landscape of layered canyons and sandstone spires.  Cottonwoods and willows wind down washes and archaeological resources are rich.  The Abajo Mountains and thousands of scenic acres of BLM land surround the district.  Temperatures in spring and fall are mild, with the month of July providing three weeks when daily high temperatures often exceed 100 degrees F.  Opportunities to hike, run rivers, rock climb, cycle, and motor-recreate are numerous and varied.  Housing in the district is excellent.

The town of Monticello is 50 miles away, and offers typical small town amenities, including a grocery store, library, coffee shop, churches, hospital, and schools.

Other information:

  • Occupancy of government quarters is required.  
  • Travel, transportation, and relocation expenses will be authorized.
  • This is a permanent full-time, career-seasonal position. Incumbents can expect to be in pay status for 13 pay periods, but not more 24 pay period per calendar year.?

To be considered, submit the following to Brenda Tupek, Human Resources Specialist, by the close of business on Wednesday, August 20th:

  •  A resume/application that includes the information identified in the Resume Builder area of USAJOBS.
  • A copy of your Type-I law enforcement commission and the following certifications if you possess one: Wildland Fire Red Card, and/or Standard First Aid, CPR, EMT certification.
  • A copy of your current or latest performance appraisal.
  • A current SF-50, Notification of Personnel Action, documenting permanent competitive civil service status.

Resumes may be mailed, faxed, or emailed directly to Brenda Tupek’s attention: National Park Service, Canyonlands National Park, Attn: Human Resources, Human Resources, 2282 SW Resource Boulevard, Moab UT, 84532. Fax: 435-719-2322. Email: brenda_tupek@nps.gov

Applications will be kept on file and may be used for filling other vacancies at Canyonlands and Arches National Parks.

For further information about this position (s), please contact Acting Chief Ranger Kevin Moore. Phone: (435) 719-2120. Email: kevin_moore@nps.gov.

[Submitted by Kevin Moore, kevin_moore@nps.gov, (435)719-2120]