The Morning Report

Friday, August 22, 2014

Recent Editions  

INCIDENTS



Mount Rainier National Park (WA)
Bodies Of Three Climbers Recovered

On August 19th, recovery operations were successfully conducted for three bodies located by air operations on August 7th. They are believed to be members of the party of six climbers that went missing from Liberty Ridge in late May (click on this link for the original report).

Due to the risks associated with inserting personnel into an area frequented by rock and ice fall, the crew of a Northwest Helicopters MD-530 employed a remotely controlled Heli-Tech grabber device mounted on a 100-foot-long line to retrieve the bodies. 

Eight rangers assisted in the planning and execution of the mission. The bodies were  turned over to the Pierce County medical examiner’s office, which will work on identification. No evidence of additional bodies was encountered during the operation. 

[Submitted by Patti Wold, Information Officer]


Grand Teton National Park (WY)
Search For Missing Concession Employee Continues

The ongoing search for Aleksandr Sagiev, a Russian national employed at Dornan's, a restaurant in Moose within the park, was complicated yesterday by a simultaneous manhunt for three people who attempted to break into an employee dorm room at Jackson Lake Lodge.

Rangers and Teton County Sherriff’s Office personnel began the manhunt yesterday morning. Jackson Lake Lodge security officers had reported that three young men were actively breaking into and entering an employee dorm room at the Lodge around 9:00 a.m. When they attempted to contact the three men, they fled into the woods.

Security officers also reported that one of the three men matched a description of Aleksandr Sagiev, the subject of an ongoing search reported in yesterday’s edition.

Rangers and deputies set up containment around the lodge. Roadside checkpoints were also set up around the park, and drivers were instructed not to pick up hitchhikers.  At no time during this incident were visitors in any danger.

All three men were found around noon. They received mandatory citations to appear in federal magistrate’s court on trespassing charges. The three were not associated with Sagiev, as first thought. The two incidents are not related.

  

A tip received by park staff on Thursday afternoon indicated that Sagiev began a hike from the Taggart Lake trailhead at 9 a.m. on Monday. Efforts to locate him yesterday were unsuccessful and the search continues.

[Submitted by Jackie Skaggs, Public Affairs Officer]


Grand Canyon National Park (AZ)
Falling Victim Rescued From Below South Rim

On August 20th, a 22-year-old visitor from California fell off the South Rim near the Hopi House Gift Shop, suffering non-life threatening injuries. 

The man, who reportedly suffers from a seizure disorder, experienced a seizure while walking near the edge. Fortunately, his fall was arrested when his leg wedged in the crook of a tree limb, limiting the distance he fell to about 20 vertical feet. 

The man’s father immediately climbed over a small rock wall on the edge and down into the trees his son was stuck in.  Rescuers were able to extricate the father without ropes, but the son’s injuries required full immobilization and a vertical technical rescue.

[Submitted by Brandon Torres, Branch Chief of Emergency Services]


Grand Canyon National Park (AZ)
Woman Bitten By Rattlesnake Rescued

Just after sunset on August 18th, a woman camping along the Colorado River with a commercial river trip was bitten twice – once in each hand – by a small rattlesnake.  The woman was reportedly attempting to pick the snake up when the incident occurred. 

Thunderstorms in the area prevented a helicopter response until after midnight.  An Arizona DPS Rescue flight crew out of Flagstaff using night vision goggles successfully flew the woman out of the canyon to Flagstaff Medical Center, where she was admitted for several days while receiving anti-venom treatment. 

Rattlesnake bite incidents requiring anti-venom administration are very rare at the Grand Canyon.

[Submitted by Brandon Torres, Branch Chief of Emergency Services]


NEWS AND NOTES



Office of Communications
Pullman Historic District Considered As New Unit

Director Jarvis visited Chicago yesterday and heard from neighbors and advocates supporting the inclusion of the city’s Pullman neighborhood in the national park system.

Jarvis joined other state and local officials at the public meeting, which included significant attendance from local community members and activists interested in telling the nationally significant Pullman story and boosting economic activity in the neighborhood.

Jarvis discussed how new sites are added to the National Park System and talked about the benefits associated with the designation of a National Park Service unit. In 2013, national park visitors contributed $26.5 billion to the nation’s economy and supported almost 240,000 jobs across the country.

“In advance of Labor Day, the history of the Pullman Historic District seems all the more relevant, including compelling stories about manufacturing, civil rights, labor relations, and urban planning,” he said. “These are important chapters of this nation’s history. It energizes me to see how engaged and committed the community in and around Pullman is to the idea of including this site in our National Park System.”

“As the National Park Service looks toward our centennial in 2016, sites like Pullman also offer opportunities for more Americans to visit parks that are close to home and that allow them to discover the stories of our shared history that resonate on a personal level.”

On August 25th, the National Park Service will celebrate its 98th anniversary on Founder’s Day, marking two years until the National Park Service’s centennial.  Leading up to its centennial, the National Park Service has launched a public awareness campaign to help Americans find their park.

“If the Pullman Historic District is added to the National Park System, it would allow us to introduce the National Park Service and its role in protecting all Americans stories to a new community,” said Jarvis. “Reaching new audiences and inviting them to discover the value of all parks is a key goal for the National Park Service as it moves into its second century.”

Constructed by industrialist George Pullman between 1880 and 1884, Pullman was a completely planned model industrial town, representing a dramatic and pioneering departure from the unhealthy, over-crowded makeshift and unsanitary living conditions found in working-class districts in other 19th century industrial cities and towns.

In 1894, it was the focus of a bloody and violent strike which had spread nation-wide over the railroad networks, prompting President Grover Cleveland to intervene with Federal troops and resulting in the first use of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act against the unions.

Last year, the National Park Service issued a reconnaissance survey of the Pullman Historic District, which determined the site to be of national significance. Reconnaissance surveys are preliminary assessments that determine whether a site is likely to meet the criteria for inclusion in the National Park System: significance, suitability, feasibility, and need for direct National Park Service management. 

New additions to the National Park System can be accomplished by an act of Congress. The first step in that process is frequently a National Park Service study, like the reconnaissance survey completed last year for Pullman Historic District.

A unit of the National Park System can also be created through the use of the Antiquities Act, which allows the President to designate a site as a national monument. Since the enactment of the Antiquities Act in 1906, most Presidents have used the authority, resulting in the establishment of almost 140 national monuments and assuring the protection of their historic or scientific resources. 

Congress has often revisited these areas later on and re-designated them as national parks.  Almost half of the national parks in the National Park System today were first protected as national monuments under the Antiquities Act.

[Submitted by April Slayton]

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Fire and Aviation Management
Facilitated Learning Adds Value For NPS Structural Fire

The training exercise was over. Crews were busy reloading their engines for another assignment when the accident occurred. A firefighter unintentionally fell 11 feet off a building roof and onto a raised electrical box.  

Although the student was not seriously injured, the question on everyone’s mind was, how did this happen? Hundreds of students performed the same drill before without any previous incidents or injury. Why was it different today?    

How can we, as an organization, learn from this falling accident? An After Action Review (AAR) may be useful, but it lacks an outside perspective and generally isn’t shared servicewide. On the other hand, the incident clearly doesn’t meet the criteria for a Serious Accident Investigation (SAI). So following this recent unfortunate event, the NPS Structural Fire Program turned to a relatively new process for the NPS: Facilitated Learning Analysis (FLA).   

FLA has been around for a number of years and has been used extensively in the wildland fire community to generate lessons learned from unintended events such as near misses, entrapments, fire shelter deployments, close calls, and vehicle accidents. Originally created by the U.S. Forest Service, many describe the FLA as an “AAR on steroids.”

The guiding principle of the FLA is to improve performance by capitalizing on the shared experiences of the participants. The FLA is not about finding fault or blame when an incident occurs. One of the most beneficial aspects of FLA is that the process is designed to be flexible and expandable depending on the need. In short, the FLA allows us to treat accidents as valuable opportunities to look deeply into the operation to better understand how employees perceive risk and how program leaders manage it.

To make the FLA process work, a skilled facilitator, rather than an investigator, is needed. The facilitator requires experience and competence in reflective and active listening, interviewing techniques, and accident sequence re-creation. The facilitator will usually work with a team of subject matter experts whose number depends upon the size and complexity of the incident being reviewed.

Upon completing the FLA, the team will generate a final report which will contain a compelling accident story designed specifically for organizational learning. Perhaps most importantly, the report will draw upon human performance expertise to explain the nature of the accident and analyze the key conditions that surrounded the event. Doctor Jennifer Ziegler, a research specialist in organizational communication and management practices in dangerous occupations, reports that FLA helps move difficult operations from a high risk/low frequency environment, the most dangerous situation, towards a high risk/high frequency model, where risks are readily recognized and mitigations are understood.

FLA is significant in that it views the accident as a notice that there are risks involved in our work that we as an organization have not accurately understood, have become complacent with, or are not managing appropriately. “Integrating FLA into our ever-expanding tools for learning and risk assessment just makes sense,” stated Hal Spencer Branch Chief for Structural Fire. “We have a solid history of learning from our experiences and enhancing safety for the Service. Incorporating FLA into our program will help employees across the Service look at accidents differently.”

Following this accident, students, instructors, and program managers used the FLA report to develop new strategies to address the causes of this accident and develop a corrective action plan (CAP). “We put a CAP in place to ensure implementation benchmarks were built into the process so that anyone can check our progress and see the positive changes we have made,” noted Spencer.

The NPS Structural Fire Program will continue to use FLA as appropriate to add value for all levels of the organization.

[Submitted by Mark Gorman, mark_gorman@nps.gov, 208.387.5244]

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Geologic Resources Division
Mosaics In Science Interns Meet With Secretary Jewell

Twenty-one interns from the Mosaics in Science internship program were fortunate to sit down and talk with Secretary Jewell on August 5th about their experiences interning this summer with the National Park Service. 

To finalize their science internships, the participants attended a career workshop in Washington DC to present the results of their internships, learn about federal science careers and how to apply for a federal job, meet with DOI and National Park Service managers and staff, and see a few of the NPS sites in Washington DC.

Secretary Jewell spent time learning about the interesting projects that the college students and recent graduates completed this summer, asked about their future plans, and discussed ways to improve youth programs in the federal government. This summer, the Mosaics interns were placed in parks in all NPS regions and worked on a variety of interesting projects ranging from preparing educational programs at Denali National Park and Preserve to measuring water quality in Cuyahoga Valley National Park to inventorying shipwrecks in Biscayne National Park.

The Mosaics in Science Internship Program provides youth that are typically under-represented in science career fields with on-the-ground, science-based, work experiences in the National Park System. Program objectives are to encourage diverse youth (17-25 years old) to pursue studies in STEM fields; introduce youth to science careers in the National Park Service; provide meaningful and relevant science-based internships in parks; and increase relevance, diversity, and inclusion in the NPS workplace. This multidisciplinary program provides opportunities to work on inventory and monitoring, research, GIS, and interpretation and education projects.

The program is administered by the Geologic Resources Division in close collaboration with the Youth Programs Division and in partnership with The Geological Society of America.  Each project is fully funded by the NPS Youth Programs Division or the National Park Foundation. A call for proposals soliciting project proposals will be issued in September for internships during the summer of 2015.

[Submitted by Lisa Norby, lisa_norby@nps.gov, 303-969-2318]

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Servicewide
Upcoming Training Calendar

All training offerings – webinars, online courses and training sessions in the field – appear in this listing only, updated each Friday. Entries must be received by midday Thursday at the latest for the following day’s update. Send them to Bill_Halainen@contractor.nps.gov.

All entries must be brief and should have the following:

  • Beginning and ending dates.
  • Name and location of course.
  • A short one- to two-line description.
  • The closing date for application or registration.
  • Name(s) and number(s) for more information.
  • Most importantly, a link to a website where full announcements or detailed information can be found.

New listings and revisions to this week’s calendar are in bold face. They are removed from the calendar once the application deadline has passed.

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Training and Webinars

August 26 – April 27 – Fundamentals of Section 106: Midwest Region, Minneapolis, MN. See full announcement here.  Contact: Stephen Rogers; stephen_rogers@nps.gov or 402-661-1912.

August 26 – August 28 – Fundamentals of Section 106: Pacific West Region, Fort Vancouver NHS. See full announcement here. Contact: Cari Kreshak; cari_kreshak@nps.gov or 808-228-5334.

August 27 – Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces Webinar: The Bison – Going Beyond The Symbol, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. EDT. For the past year, three associate directorates – Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion; Interpretation, Education, and Volunteers; and Cultural Resources, Partnerships and Science – have been partnering with George Washington University’s Museum Studies department to develop a series of training events open to all NPS employees, partners, and the general public. “Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces” consists of two webinars – the first on August 27th and the second on September 3rd – and a two-day symposium on September 17th and 18th. This first webinar will unpack the symbol of the bison and explore how new collaborations are working to heal the wounds of the past.  Speakers:  Glenn Plumb, Chief Wildlife Biologist, Wildlife Conservation Branch; Reed Robinson, Superintendent, Devils Tower NM; Albert LeBeau, CR Program Manager, Effigy Mounds NM; Jim Stone, Executive Director, Inter Tribal Buffalo Council; Trudy Ecoffey, Tribal Liaison Pine Ridge, Natural Resources Conservation Service, US Department of Agriculture; Keith Aune, Wildlife Conservation Society. NPS employees should register online at http://goo.gl/acITld for individual sessions or the full training event.  Information on accessing the webinars and the webcast will be sent to all registrants. Employees are strongly encouraged to attend the full training event and may receive credit by also enrolling through DOI LEARN no later than August 25th. For more information, go to this link or contact Sangita Chari, Special Assistant to the Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion, National Park Service, Phone:  (202) 354-2203, Email: office_rdi@nps.gov .

September 3 – September 5 – Engineering for Historic Timber Framing Workshop, Natchitoches, LA. The National Center for Preservation Technology and Training is partnering with the Preservation Trades Network, the Association for the Preservation Historic Natchitoches, and the Friends of NCPTT to hold a series of workshop investigating the engineering issues facing historic timber structures. This workshop will bring in preservation engineers, timber framers, site managers, historic building owners, and other parties to discuss best practices for planning and implementing these multi-faceted projects. The focus of these workshops will be African House, which is a 200-year-old, low-fired brick and timber framed building located at Melrose Plantation outside of Natchitoches. For more information or to register please visit the training announcement (http://ncptt.nps.gov/events/engineering-for-historic-timber-framing-workshop) or contact Sarah Marie Jackson atsarah_m_jackson@nps.gov or 318-356-7444.

September 3 – Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces Webinar: Relevancy, Diversity and Inclusion – Expanding National Park Service Narratives, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. EDT. For the past year, three associate directorates – Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion; Interpretation, Education, and Volunteers; and Cultural Resources, Partnerships and Science – have been partnering with George Washington University’s Museum Studies department to develop a series of training events open to all NPS employees, partners, and the general public. “Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces” consists of two webinars – the first on August 27th and the second on September 3rd – and a two-day symposium on September 17th and 18th. This second webinar will focus on diversity. The National Park Service recognizes that America's diversity has given this country its unique strength, resilience, and richness. The Service also recognizes that its greatest promise in the 21st century cannot be achieved unless we improve on our record of including the diversity of the nation in all of the National Park Service's activities. Speakers:  Michael Reynolds, Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy, and Inclusion; Julia Washburn, Associate Director, Interpretation, Education, and Volunteers; Steve Pitti, NPS Advisory Board Member, Professor of History and American Studies, Director of the Program in Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, and Master of Ezra Stiles College at Yale University; Milton Chen, NPS Advisory Board Member, Senior Fellow, The George Lucas Educational Foundation, Edutopia.org & Edutopia video. NPS employees should register online at http://goo.gl/acITld for individual sessions or the full training event.  Information on accessing the webinars and the webcast will be sent to all registrants. Employees are strongly encouraged to attend the full training event and may receive credit by also enrolling through DOI LEARN no later than August 25th. For more information, go to this link or contact Sangita Chari, Special Assistant to the Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion, National Park Service, Phone:  (202) 354-2203, Email: office_rdi@nps.gov .

September 8 – September 11 – NAGPRA in the Parks, webinar. This online course about the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) will provide an overview of NAGPRA and prepare participants to respond to inadvertent discoveries and plan for intentional excavations as prescribed by the law. This is a multiple session course consisting of four two-hour sessions on consecutive days. Detailed information can be found in the full announcement. To register, email mary_carroll@nps.gov by August 27th. Contact: Mary S. Carroll, mary_carroll@nps.gov or 303-969-2300.

September 9 – September 10 – Distance Education Technology Transfer Workshop, Cabrillo NM, San Diego, CA. This course is designed to provide end users (interpreters, education specialists, resource managers, fire managers or information technology staff) with the resources and knowledge necessary to assemble a Telexploration backpack and present a real-time distance learning program to a remote audience and to design and deploy a basic wireless systems sufficient to present real-time live Telexploration programs in your park. The closing date for applications is August 15th. For more information on the workshop, go to this web page: http://seatoshiningsea.org/events_New.html. Contact: Amanda Gossard at amanda_gossard@nps.gov.

September 9 – September 11 – Structural Firefighter Recertification and Refresher Course, Grand Canyon NP, AZ. This three-day class satisfies the refresher requirements for NPS Structural Firefighters as outlined in Chapter 12 of Reference Manual 58, NPS Structural Fire Management. The course is designed to refresh the skills, knowledge and competencies of previously certified structural firefighting personnel through the utilization of live fire scenarios. NPS live fire qualified instructors direct the training in compliance with NFPA 1403 and OSHA requirements. Application deadline is August 11th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

September 15 – October 17 – National Search & Rescue Academy, Camp Navajo, Bellemont. AZ. The National Park Service in conjunction with the Department of Defense will conduct this year’s fall session of the National Search & Rescue Academy at Camp Navajo, which is ten miles west of Flagstaff, Arizona. NSARA provides an intensive five-week comprehensive SAR training program for federal employees. This program will provide participants with a venue to efficiently attain basic field rescuer skills in a single condensed format which typically requires several years of career development. This core program provides participants with essential field rescue skills in ground search operations, ICS, swiftwater rescue, technical rope rescue, search management, basic aviation safety, helicopter rescue techniques, and remote/austere EMS techniques. This program is delivered in the classroom and various physically challenging outdoor environments. To broaden interagency cooperation, allied and federal agency personnel will jointly attend this academy. NSARA participants will be housed in shared military barrack style quarters during the training and are required to adhere to all local policies of the hosting facility. On-site lodging and meals during the academy will be provided at no expense to NPS participants. En route travel and per diem costs, as well lodging and meals associated with three days of off-site swiftwater training, will be borne by the benefiting work unit. This is a very physically demanding course and participants are required to perform at an arduous level without physical, mental, or emotional limitations. Participants will be involved in physical fitness training, which will be completed through the Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test, and participants are required to achieve a “First Class PFT Score” by the end of the academy. Prerequisites: In addition to completion of independent study classes on Basic ICS and SAR, candidates must possess a current minimum certification at the First Responder or Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) level. For further information on this training, refer to the announcement and nomination form at this link. Submit completed nomination forms to NSARA Coordinator Ken Phillips, NPS Branch Chief of Search & Rescue, at ken_phillips@nps.gov or 928-606-3862 (cell). Nominations are due by August 15th.

September 16 – September 17 – NEPA/NHPA Section 106 Workshop: Intermountain Region, Grand Canyon NP. See full announcement here.  Contact: Cheryl Eckhardt; cheryl_eckhardt@nps.gov or 303-969-2851.

September 17 – September 18 – Symposium: Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces. The two-day symposium will create a forum for NPS administrators and interpreters, academics, museum professionals, anthropologists, and public historians from across the country to discuss how the National Park Service can best define and communicate the complex and challenging narratives that comprise the history of the United States. Scheduled panelists include representatives from NPS sites including Fort Smith National Historic Site; Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site; Manzanar; Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site; Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front National Historic Site. Participating museums include the National Museum of the American Indian; US Holocaust Memorial Museum; National Museum of African American History and Culture; Harriet Beecher Stowe Center; and the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. In addition, academics, independent historians, and anthropologists will participate. NPS staff can participate in person or view the two day symposium via a live webcast. NPS employees should register online at http://goo.gl/acITld for individual sessions or the full training event.  Information on accessing the webinars and the webcast will be sent to all registrants. Employees are strongly encouraged to attend the full training event and may receive credit by also enrolling through DOI LEARN no later than August 25th. For more information, go to this link or contact Sangita Chari, Special Assistant to the Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion, National Park Service, Phone:  (202) 354-2203, Email: office_rdi@nps.gov .

September 23 – September 25 Firearms Instructor Refresher Training, Alameda County Sheriff’s Office, Dublin, CA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is August 13th.

September 30 – October 3 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Refresher Instructor Training, Yosemite, CA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is August 15th.

September 30 – October 2 – Conference On Preservation And Stewardship Of Historic Places, Yellowstone NP, WY. This conference is for those historic and rustic architecture practitioners who are looking to build new skills and network with professionals and craftspeople in the field. The conference will provide opportunities to learn and exchange ideas through hands-on experiences, classroom presentations and facilitated dialog. Participants can earn up to 16 AIA CEU continuing education credits. The tuition is $395. For more information and to register, go to http://www.preservemontana.org/ynprustic/ .

October 6 – October 10 – Structural Firefighter I (Defensive Firefighter) Course, Gateway NRA (Sandy Hook Unit), NJ. This 40-hour course is designed to provide basic training at the NFPA 1001, Firefighter I level with the minimum skills necessary to function safely and effectively as a member of a structural firefighting team under direct supervision. Course emphasis is on individual and engine company manipulative skills essential for personal safety and efficiency in support of defensive (exterior) operations with limited offensive skills targeting trash and vehicle fires and indirect attacks in the suppression of structural fires. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is September 8th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

October 13 – October 24 – Structural Firefighter I/II Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1001 training standards to be qualified as a Structural Firefighter I and II. Participants will be able to perform both interior and exterior attacks during structural fire events. The course presents students with a strenuous hands-on curriculum that includes extensive training scenarios and live-fire drills. Students will be afforded numerous opportunities to develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed serve as a structural firefighter.  Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is September 15th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

October 20 – October 31 – Use of Force Instructor Training, New Braintree, MA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is August 28th.

October 21 – October 22 - Find 'Em: Initial Response Incident Commander, Estes Park, CO. Learn about the state-of-the-art in missing person search planning. This interactive workshop will introduce the newest and most comprehensive textbook on search and rescue management, focus on the duties and responsibilities of the initial response incident commander, and provide instruction on the use of WinCASIE search incident computer software.  Tuition is $25. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 25 people.

October 22 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Keeping Good People Good, Estes Park, CO. NPS employees begin their careers as passionate, idealistic, enthusiastic people who are often heard saying “I can’t believe they pay me to do this job.” With time, they are exposed to the subtle day-to-day pressures and demands that can be devastating to even the most experienced and capable people. This presentation is aimed at helping the participants develop a personal strategy to prevent the day-to-day pressures from destroying the very things they work so hard to build. They will learn techniques to help create the balance and resilience that is essential for their long-term professional and personal wellbeing. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 22 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Management’s Role in Keeping Good People Good, Estes Park, CO. Organizations spend a significant amount of time, energy and money hiring and training good people, but that is just the beginning. After the hiring process is over, managers have an important role in helping Keep Good People Good. Positive leadership, a proactive approach to problem solving, the “Courage to Communicate,” and holding people respectfully accountable are key to preventing employee-related problems. Managers are responsible for the guidance, mentorship, and coaching that helps employees improve performance and achieve their full potential. This program is aimed at helping managers apply the theories of leadership & management to everyday, real-life situations and develop the practical skills needed to become more effective and confident leaders. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 23 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Communications Skills…They Do Make a Difference, Estes Park, CO. The ability to resolve conflicts, address differences, minimize misunderstandings, interact well with others, work as a team and enhance relationships (of all kinds) is directly related to our ability to communicate. This workshop is designed for people who want to communicate more effectively, build better relationships (at work, home and play), gain a better understanding into the power of perceptions & assumptions, and are looking to have some fun learning practical communication skills they can apply to everyday, real-life situations. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 23 Learning by Listening: Conducting Effective Oral History Interviews, Estes Park, CO. This workshop is a great opportunity to learn about all aspects of oral history. Participants will be introduced to oral history project planning; legal and ethical issues; recording technologies (audio and video); what to do before, during, and after the interview; processing and preserving interviews; and using oral history in Web sites and publications. Participants will conduct and critique a short interview on-site during the workshop. Tuition is $25. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 20 people.

November 3 – November 14 – Fire Apparatus Driver Operator Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1002 training standards to be qualified as Fire Apparatus Driver Operator. The class is designed to provide persons with the technical information and skills essential for the safe operation and proper maintenance of fire apparatus. Emphasis includes hands-on training of pumping and driving skills critical to support personnel assigned to all hazard response. Personnel will become proficient in troubleshooting, hydraulics, drafting and providing water through multiple pumping evolutions. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. Application deadline is October 6th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

November 4 – November 5 – Remington 870 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington 870 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

November 6 – November 7– Remington AR15 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington AR15 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

November 17 – November 21 – Interdisciplinary Resource Protection and Law, Southeast Regional Office, Atlanta, GA. This course provides employees with a solid understanding of the resource mission of the NPS and the primary laws, legal authorities, case law interpretation, and policies used to protect park resources. Participants will also receive instruction in the functions and roles that contribute to effective interdisciplinary group work and practice these skills through resource protection case studies. Deadline for application is September 26, 2014. Travel scholarships to help defray costs are available but must be submitted by September 26, 2014. For the full announcement and scholarship application, go to the Natural Resource Stewardship Training webpage. For more information about the course, please contact Jeri Hall, jeri_hall@nps.gov; or Cathy Purchis, cathy_purchis@nps.gov.

December 8 – December 12 – Fire Officer and Instructor Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class includes certification in both Fire Instructor I and Fire Officer I. These classes have been combined as fire instructor is a required prerequisite for fire officer. The combined class is a combination of online activities with job performance skills being demonstrated in a class or field setting. Fire instructor is designed around classroom lectures, group activities, and individual presentations. Topics include learning theories, use of instructional materials and media, maintaining student records and techniques for effective communication. The fire officer portion of the class focuses on technical knowledge and leadership skills which are essential for command and control of engine company personnel during fire emergencies. Participants will be introduced to the skills of preplanning, fire attack strategies/tactics and logistical support functions. Skills are reinforced and evaluated through dynamic group sessions and video simulations. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules and class assessments. Access to the on-line class is available on December 9th. Application deadline is November 10th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

Online Training

Web Authoring

NPS Basic Web. The basic course covers the topics that web authors need to effectively communicate via NPS websites—both internal and external. The basic course introduces students to web terminology, content strategy, accessibility, writing for the web, image selection/editing, PDF usage, web analytics, web support, and content management system (CMS) basics. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF2013.

NPS Intermediate Web. The intermediate course builds on topics covered in the basic course (above) to give park or program web coordinators (or any interested web author) resources for managing content on NPS websites. The intermediate course goes into more depth about content strategy, web analytics, accessibility, shared content on NPS.gov, and content management system (CMS) elements. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF4017

Natural Resources

Introduction to the Career Academy for Natural Resources. This two-hour on-line training orients learners to the natural resource and science career path within the National Park Service. It explains the role of the natural resource professional within the NPS, and introduces the concepts of ethical conduct, scientific integrity, interdisciplinary networks and building and maintaining professional credibility. Students will address their career development by exploring ways to design and implement professional development plans. Introduction to the Career Academy for Natural Resources is the first unit in the course of study being developed for the Foundational Natural Resource series of the Career Academy for Natural Resources. The Foundational Series is designed to help employees achieve the natural resource competencies at the entry/developmental level. It may also benefit natural resource professionals at any level who are new to the National Park Service. This course is available through DOI Learn. The course code is NPS-NRS1501. Cost: Free. To learn more about the Career Academy for Natural Resources, visit the website at http://www.nps.gov/training/nrs/academy/academy.html. For more information, please contact Jeri Hall, jeri_hall@nps.gov.

Cultural Resources

Nationwide Programmatic Agreement Toolkit. To help guide NPS staff on implementing the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement, which governs Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the NPS has developed a “toolkit.” The toolkit is mandatory training that provides guidance to NPS superintendents and Section 106 coordinators, division chiefs, and facilities staff at region and park levels on using the programmatic agreement during Section 106 review. NPS employees may earn a certificate for their review of the toolkit through DOI Learn by taking a final assessment. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the toolkit website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The toolkit website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/history/howto/PAToolkit/index.htm. For more information about the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement toolkit, please contact: Jeffrey Durbin, NPS Section 106 compliance program officer, at 202-354-1816 or Jeffrey_durbin@nps.gov

Managing Archeological Collections. Learn about caring for archeological collections and help to overcome the curation crisis. The course is designed to assist those who are interested in, or need to learn more about, preserving and managing archeological collections over the long term. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/collections/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Archeology for Interpreters. Through this training, interpreters and anyone with an interest and need to know – including law enforcement rangers, natural resource experts, and managers -- may gain basic knowledge about archeology. The course provides opportunities to learn about archeological methods and analysis and how to encourage concern for the preservation and protection of archeological resources. A park-based case study provides practice. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/AforI/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Interpretation for Archeologists. Archeologists and other resource professionals can take this training to gain a firm foundation in and understanding of the purpose, philosophy, and techniques of interpretation. The course encourages archeologists to frame their work for the public and to work with interpreters to integrate archeological perspectives into interpretive products and tell compelling stories.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/IforA/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Study Tour of Archeological Interpretation. View interpretation with “fresh eyes” to evaluate choices and strategies for interpreting archeology in parks and historic sites. Download worksheets to assist in evaluating both onsite interpretation and virtual visits.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/studytour/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Assessment of Archeological Interpretation. Use the interpretive analysis model to evaluate the effectiveness of interpreting archeological resources on the basis of visitor experience at the levels of short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and audience feedback. Learn more about the National Park Service evaluation strategy. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/aiassess/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Wilderness

The Wilderness Act of 1964. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Writing a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Evaluating a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Deciding to Keep Wilderness Wild: Four Cornerstones for Wilderness Managers. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Stewardship Planning Framework. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Visitor Use Management. A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Strategies, and Monitoring Impacts and Uses.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Natural Resource Management in Wilderness. A suite of twelve courses: Fundamentals, Challenges in Natural Resource Restoration, Monitoring, Evaluating Proposals for Scientific Activity, Fish and Wildlife, Fish and Wildlife Inventory and Monitoring, Threatened and Endangered Species, Air Quality, Soil and Water, Vegetation, Soundscapes, and Night Sky.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Cultural Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this linkfor course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Paleontological Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Retirement

Firefighter/Law Enforcement Officer Retirement Training for Human Resource Specialists, Managers and Supervisors. This course is designed to provide firefighter and law enforcement officer retirement training for human resources specialists, managers and supervisors. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

FERS Retirement Training for Firefighters and Law Enforcement Officers. This course is designed to provide firefighters and law enforcement officers with information on FERS special retirement provisions so that they can manage their careers in such a way that they maximize their benefits. Special retirement provisions apply to employees occupying these positions and they have specific responsibilities that are critical to know about and act upon throughout their careers if they expect to qualify for special retirement. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

Supervision

New Supervisor Development Program. This new training and development program, which was begun last year, is designed specifically for first-time supervisors within the 12 month probationary period of their initial appointment. The New Supervisor Development Program (NSDP) is a blended learning program that is delivered both online and in residential (three day) sessions across the country in collaboration with Bureau of Land Management, and the Fish and Wildlife Service. The online modules (completely free of cost) are available on DOILearn as preliminary work, and include the basics of in knowledge and skills for a first-time supervisor. Completion of these modules is followed by a three day Supervisory Skills Workshop (SSW) that provides synthesis and skills practice. The NSDP satisfies the initial 40-hour new supervisory training required by OPM (5CFR 412.202). There will be no cost to parks and regions in FY 2014 – all costs (tuition and travel) are being funded by WASO Learning and Development. Registrations for the SSW are managed via regional employee development officers by slot allocation.  For more information, please contact Katrina Roberts, NSDP Training Manager, 202-354-1471, or Katherine Callaway, 202-354-1403, or your regional employee development officer.  Additional information can be found at: http://www.nps.gov/training/ - click on Leadership Development Programs.  

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES



Cedar Breaks National Monument (UT)
Intergovernmental Internship Cooperative Partnership Director

The intergovernmental Internship Cooperative at Southern Utah University, a federal partner, is seeking a director.

This is a great career building opportunity to lead a unique partnership organization that was recently awarded a Partners in Conservation Award from Secretary Jewell. The Intergovernmental Internship Cooperative (IIC) is located in Cedar City, Utah, on the campus of Southern Utah University (SUU). The IIC’s mission is to “provide a unique organizational structure to network and communicate, access and share resources, and efficiently create and administer shared programs on behalf of all partners”.

Through cooperative agreements, the IIC works with six National Park Service units, the Bureau of Land Management, the Dixie National Forest,  the Bureau of Indian Affairs, two Paiute tribal governments and other partners to develop the public land leaders of tomorrow. The IIC is a centralized resource of committed and engaged partners who collaborate to provide relevant and meaningful educational experiences and career opportunities to University and other youth in the region and to meet Partner needs for a diverse workforce.  Applications are due by August 30th.

For more information, please follow this link: https://jobs.suu.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=52838.

Or contact either Briget Tyson Eastep, Ph.D., Director of Outdoor Engagement  and Associate Professor of Outdoor Recreation, Southern Utah University (eastep@suu.edu or 435-586-7829) or Paul Roelandt, Superintendent, Cedar Breaks NM (paul_roelandt@nps.gov or 435-586-9451 ext. 4421).

Jimmy Carter National Historic Site (GA)
WS-4749-6 Maintenance Worker Supervisor (Lateral)

Jimmy Carter National Historic Site is recruiting for a maintenance worker supervisor. This is a lateral opportunity.

Located in Plains, Georgia, Jimmy Carter NHS’s headquarters is 10 miles from Americus, Georgia. Major shopping is available in Columbus, Georgia, which is 45 miles distant. The park is open year-round with the majority of visitation occurring September through June.

This position is located in the facility management division and is supervised by the chief of facilities and resource management. He/she supervises five permanent and up to two temporary and seasonal employees, and is directly responsible for the first line maintenance of cultural landscape area, buildings and utilities, roads and trails, throughout Jimmy Carter National Historic Site, including paved roads, trails, signs on roads, and buildings, including a visitor center/ administration building, maintenance shop, Depot, Boyhood Home and Farm, and the Presidential grounds.  The buildings include ten historic structures and a comfort station.

Moving expenses will be paid in accordance with the Department of Interior policy.  No government housing is available. The person selected may be required to work weekends, holidays, and evenings, as needed.

The KSA’s are as follows:

1. Ability to initiate, implement and integrate a complex maintenance program, including knowledge of annual and long range planning, workload programming, prioritizing work and fiscal and budget management. Demonstrate experience with these or similar programs: Project Management Information System (PMIS), Facility Management Software System (FMSS) and Facility Condition Assessment System (FCAS).

2. Skills to plan organize and manage projects for Historic Structures and within Historic Cultural Landscapes. Knowledge of regulations for the National Historic Preservation Act and the National Environmental Policy Act.

3. Knowledge of technical practices about construction, maintenance and repair operations, including ability to write specifications and serve as a Contracting Officer’s Technical Representative (COTR). Knowledge of carpentry, electrical, plumbing, water systems, heating/air conditioning and grounds maintenance.

4. Ability to lead, motivate, coach, develop and supervise to achieve results that support organizational and hiring goals, objectives of team members, equal opportunity and internal relations. Ability to develop skills of employees and build depth in maintenance staff to handle division functions. Skills in assigning work, performance evaluation, listening to and processing complaints and coordinate training.

5. Ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships through oral and written communications to manage work with co-workers and other agencies, groups and divisions. Ability to prepare written reports and funding requests.

Each applicant's qualifications will be evaluated solely on the information submitted in the application package.  Include in application:

  • Resume – per information below
  • SF-50 – show highest grade held and career or career-conditional status
  • KSA’s – per KSA’s listed above
  • Most recent performance appraisal

In addition to any other forms or information required, submit a resume or written application containing the following information: (1) Job Information — Title and grade of the job for which you are applying; (2) Personal Information — Full name, mailing address and day and evening phone numbers; (you must attach SF-50 for proof of your career or career-conditional status and grade level), and highest federal civilian grade held (also give job series and dates held.); (3) Education (4) Work Experience — Give the following information for your paid and nonpaid work experience related to the job for which you are applying: (a) Job title (include series and grade if Federal job) (b) Duties and accomplishments (c) Employer's name and address (d) Supervisor's name and phone number (e) Starting and ending dates (month and year) (f) Hours per week (g) Salary. Please indicate if we may contact your current supervisor. (5) Other Qualifications - Job related training courses; job related certificates and licenses; and job related honors, awards, and special accomplishments. (6) References - Include a list of at least three references (name, title, address, phone number). Applicants must provide a copy of their most current performance appraisal.

If you submit your application by mail, it must be received on or before September 1st. Send to Jimmy Carter National Historic Site, Attn:  Chief of Facilities and Resource Management, 300 North Bond Street, Plains, Georgia 31780. If you submit your application by fax, it must be received at Jimmy Carter National Historic Site, Attn: Amy Hite (fax: 229-824-4111) by 12:00 Midnight Eastern Standard Time, on or before September 1st.

Applications received in postage-free government envelopes or through government mail channels will be rejected by this office and returned to the applicant. For information about the application process, contact Karen Barry, Administrative Officer, at 229-824-4576 ext. 22 or e-mail to Karen_Barry@nps.gov. For technical information about the position, contact: Amy Hite, Chief of Facilities and Resource Management at 229-376-2955or e-mail to Amy_Hite@nps.gov.