The Morning Report

Friday, June 27, 2014

Recent Editions  

INCIDENTS



Denali National Park & Preserve (AK)
Flooding Causes Park Road Closure, Evacuations

Torrential rains Wednesday night caused what are usually small streams to become raging torrents along and across the Denali Park Road.

At 4:30 a.m. on Thursday the park road was closed beyond Wonder Lake due to flooding in the Kantishna area at Eureka and Friday Creeks (which normally flow at very low levels across the park road) and at the north end of Wonder Lake. Around 8:45 a.m. park managers closed the road beyond the Eielson Visitor Center due to significant rockfall at the Eielson Bluffs, approximately one to two miles west of the visitor center.

Over 100 guests and employees at private lodges in Kantishna and more than a dozen park employees were marooned at the western end of the park road, but all were safe and accounted for.  The Denali Backcountry Lodge, which is located at the end of the road near the airstrip, evacuated its guests and staff to higher ground near another lodge Thursday morning as water began encroaching into buildings.

Lodge guests and employees were subsequently evacuated without incident. They were ferried by the park’s two contract helicopters to buses staged at the Wonder Lake Ranger Station or by fixed-wing aircraft to airstrips near or at the east end of the park. Park employees in that area were also evacuated. Guests at other lodges did not have to evacuate and will be able to leave via the road today as temporary repairs have been made to the causeway section of road at the north end of Wonder Lake.

Four mountaineers who had traversed Mt. McKinley were airlifted from the south side of the McKinley River to the Eielson Visitor Center. They had been trying for days to cross the river, but had been unsuccessful due to the high water and were out of food. The river is notoriously difficult to cross, especially after heavy rain. A Denali Backcountry Lodge employee who had been stranded on what became an island in the housing area was able to get across the swollen Moose Creek with assistance from other employees and a rope.

Road crews will coordinate plans for repairing the damaged sections of the park road at Eureka and Friday Creeks with the Alaska Department of Transportation, which has the jurisdictional responsibility for that portion of the road. Road repairs may take several days.  

Park concessioner-operated buses will operate on their regular schedule as far as Wonder Lake beginning today.

Click on the link below for a related Anchorage Daily News story with images of the flooding.

[Submitted by Kris Fister, Public Affairs Officer]

 More Information...
Cuyahoga Valley National Park (OH)
Historic Structure Burns To The Ground

On Saturday, June 21st, the Lapchynski House, an NPS historic structure in Independence, Ohio, burned to the ground.

Smoke was reported at approximately 6 p.m. and the house had already burned to the ground by the time protection ranger Jeff Stell and firefighters from five local departments arrived on scene. 

The house, built circa 1880, had suffered from extensive vandalism and graffiti. It was located in a remote area of the park and there was a project in the PMIS system to demolish it. 

Rangers provided a 24/7 fire watch to protect the scene until it could be processed for evidence. The NPS is working with the State Fire Marshal's Office and Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) fire investigators on this incident. Rangers are also working on a task force regarding the investigation of eight fires that have occurred in the park over the last six months.

[Submitted by Chris Ryan, Chief Ranger]


Yosemite National Park (CA)
Injured Climber Rescued From Sentinel Rock

On Tuesday, June 17th, dispatch received a 911 call from an injured rock climber at the base of the Chounard-Herbert climbing route on Sentinel Rock in Yosemite Valley. The climber, a 30-year-old man from Bend, Oregon, said that he’d taken a 35-foot fall on the first pitch of the route, that he’d suffered injuries to his lower extremities, and that he was unable to self-rescue.

A ground response team consisting of Yosemite Search and Rescue team members Everett Phillips, Matt Othmer, Ken Kreis, and Buck Yedor was dispatched to the scene. The park's contract helicopter was also ordered for a reconnaissance flight and potential short haul mission.  

Following a reconnaissance flight, the helicopter lowered rangers Jack Hoeflich and David Pope and their extrication equipment via short haul to a ledge approximately 250 feet below the injured climber. Hoeflich climbed to the man and fixed ropes for Pope and additional ground responders.

The team, including Hoeflich, Pope and SAR personnel, packaged the injured man in a litter and lowered him with Pope back to the insertion ledge.  The helicopter returned and short-hauled Pope and the man to the Ahwahnee Meadow in Yosemite Valley, where he was taken to  Yosemite Valley Medical Clinic. The remaining team members descended to the valley via the climber’s approach.

The mission was complicated by the steepness of the north face of Sentinel Rock, gusty winds, high rockfall potential, and the relative position of the sun and cliff face, which caused the helicopter to be in direct sunlight while the short haulers were in the shadow of the cliff.

Ranger David Hahn was the incident commander for this rescue.

[Submitted by Kari Cobb, Public Affairs Officer]


Lake Mead National Recreation Area - NV
One Killed, Two Injured In Head-On Collision

On the morning of June 23rd, park dispatch received a call reporting a head-on collision on Northshore Road.

Emergency personnel from the park and Henderson Fire Department responded. They found that one man had been killed in the accident and that two others had been injured. Both were flown to area hospitals by Mercy Air.

The Nevada Highway Patrol is investigating the accident.

[Submitted by Christie Vanover]


NEWS AND NOTES



Lake Mead National Recreation Area - NV
New National Water Trail Established

Secretary of Interior Sally Jewell has designated a portion of the Lower Colorado River that flows through Lake Mead National Recreation Area as a National Water Trail.

“This recognition places the Black Canyon Water Trail in a distinctive national network of exemplary water trails and commends the efforts of the local community and partners in promoting active involvement in the conservation of our water resources,” Jewell wrote in a congratulatory letter to members of the Lower Colorado River Water Trail Alliance.


The alliance submitted the Black Canyon Water Trail application in 2012. Through this designation, it is now one of 16 nationally recognized water trails nationwide. It is the first water trail in America’s Southwest and the first that traverses a desert.

Visitors can access the Black Canyon Water Trail through a guided tour at the base of the Hoover Dam or from Willow Beach, Arizona, or near an old mining town in Eldorado Canyon, Nevada.

As visitors travel down the 30-mile trail alongside wilderness and solitude, they can stop at sandy beaches, colorful caves, plentiful coves and active hot springs. Desert bighorn sheep and other wildlife are often seen on the cliffs along the river. There is also a great deal of history associated with the construction of and research connected to Hoover Dam including the sauna cave, gauging stations, catwalks, trails and building foundations. 

“These trails provide an opportunity for families to get outside and explore some of our nation’s most beautiful waterways, and by highlighting them as part of the National Water Trails System, more visitors will have the opportunity to visit and add value to their local economies,” National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis said. “The National Water Trails System highlights the best of our nation’s water trails that encourage recreation and stewardship.”

For more information on the Black Canyon Water Trail, visit http://www.nps.gov/lake/planyourvisit/black-canyon-water-trail.htm.

Explore the entire National Water Trails System online at www.nps.gov/watertrails.

For more information on new water trails, click on the link below.
 More Information...
Office of Communications
Yount, Hartzog And Young Awards Conferred

Being a park ranger comes naturally for Tom Betts – you could even say it is in his blood. As the son of a park ranger, Betts literally and figuratively grew up honing his outdoor skills in national parks. Since 1980, Betts has added to the family legacy by becoming one of the most accomplished and respected park rangers in the country. Last night, the National Park Service and the National Park Foundation presented him with the 2013 Harry Yount National Park Ranger Award for excellence in the art and science of rangering – the agency’s most prestigious ranger honor.

“The Harry Yount Award, named in honor of the first known park ranger, recognizes the best of the best in the National Park Service,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “Having worked beside Tom in Crater Lake and Wrangell-St. Elias, I know that he is a model park ranger – a true leader whose intelligence, situational awareness, physical strength, and skill set make the extraordinarily tough jobs look easy. He has truly made a difference in the parks, and for the visitors, through the years.”

The son of a park ranger, Betts currently serves as the chief ranger at Bandelier National Monument. He has also worked at Crater Lake, Lake Clark, Hawai’i Volcanoes, Grand Teton, Grand Canyon, Rocky Mountain, Yellowstone, and Wrangell-St. Elias national parks during his 32-year National Park Service career. Service at such diverse parks has allowed Betts to take on a variety of duties and circumstances. He has protected park visitors and resources during volcano eruptions, wildland fires, earthquakes, floods, snowstorms, wildlife encounters, and search and rescue missions. He has conducted patrols via foot, truck, boat, helicopter, raft, ATV, skis, snowmobile, horseback, and airplane.

At Crater Lake, he helped to extricate a seriously injured baby trapped in an overturned vehicle. He provided her with constant care during transport to the hospital and resuscitated her when she stopped breathing. During another rescue, he personally carried a hiker with a skull fracture more than a mile up a steep Grand Canyon trail.

“Early in my career I was told ‘Remember who you are and what you stand for,’” said Betts. “I have always tried to emulate the high standards and uncompromised ethics exhibited by my father, my father-in-law, and many other fantastic park rangers I’ve had the privilege to work with and know. I have been very fortunate to have had a career doing the things I love in some of the most amazing places on earth.”

Also recognized at the ceremony were the recipients of the 2013 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service. The awards are named for former National Park Service Director George B. Hartzog, Jr. who started the Volunteers-In-Parks (VIP) Program in 1970 with 300 participants. Last year, more than 246,000 volunteers donated 6.7 million hours of time and talent to help preserve and protect national parks.

“Each year, volunteers make extraordinary contributions across the National Park System. The George and Helen Hartzog Awards honor the distinguished group of individuals who proudly give of themselves to make the National Park Service a stronger and more vibrant institution,” said Neil Mulholland, President and CEO of the National Park Foundation. “This award recognizes the great legacy started by George Hartzog and carried on today by his wife Helen and embodied by the passionate people giving back to America’s national parks.”

Jim Robbins from Catoctin Mountain Park received the Hartzog Individual Volunteer Award. Jim has been a driving force in reaching new audiences and forming partnerships that have expanded the park’s youth service and educational programs. Last year, Jim personally contributed more than 500 volunteer hours to Catoctin. He was also directly responsible for an additional 2,000 hours donated by church, school, and civic groups he recruited to help in the park.

Ashley Burns from George Washington Carver National Monument received the Hartzog Youth Volunteer Award. Just 17 years old, Ashley has already been a volunteer for seven years. In addition to bringing her talent and energy to park operations throughout the year, Ashley has developed engaging programs for park special events, including Prairie Day, Carver Day, National Park Week, and the Summer Junior Rangers.

The Coastal Cleanup Corporation from Biscayne National Park received the Hartzog Volunteer Group Award. The group is a nonprofit, founded by George and Suzy Pappas, which addresses the issue of marine debris and its effects on wildlife, particularly threatened and endangered sea turtles, in the park. George and Suzy have provided more than 800 volunteer hours themselves, in addition to leading and inspiring more than 400 Alternative Spring Break volunteers who provided 2,500 hours toward shoreline cleanup in the park. Last year, the Coastal Cleanup Corporation removed more than 12,000 pounds of marine debris from sea turtle nesting beaches.

The FRESH (Flat Rock Exceptional Sandburg Helpers) group from Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site received the Hartzog Volunteer Youth Group Award. Last year, 44 youth volunteers between the ages of 11 and 15 provided care for the descendants of Mrs. Sandburg’s champion dairy goat herd that live in the park. The youth spent 1,560 hours working with the park’s staff and other volunteers, including 4H mentors. They learned about the goats and the history of the dairy goat industry. The youth handled and groomed the goats, fed them, cleaned their stalls, and explained their history and role at the site. Their efforts provided 8,000 park visitors with insight into a unique aspect of the park. They also continued Mrs. Sandburg’s tradition of showing the goats and earned a couple of first places in a state fair.

Cabrillo National Monument received the Hartzog Park Volunteer Program Award. Under the leadership of Park Ranger Tavio del Rio, the park’s volunteer program has more than doubled since 2010. Last year, nearly 400 VIPs (Volunteers-In-Parks) logged about 12,000 hours. The influx of new volunteers has bolstered existing programs and allowed the park to provide new opportunities. Dynamic volunteer-based accomplishments include the formation of the Cabrillo National Monument Conservancy – a nonprofit park friends group, the expansion of the Tidepool Protection Education & Restoration Program, the establishment of the Dusty Socks Club to promote outdoor fitness, and the creation of the “Fort Rosencrans Goes to War” program which restored a derelict bunker into a fully operating command post staffed by living history volunteers.

Glen Brinkman from Homestead National Monument of America posthumously received the Hartzog Enduring Volunteer Service Award. Glen was an active and dedicated volunteer for more than 15 years. He donated more than 13,000 hours of time and will be especially remembered for his lasting contributions to Pioneers Days and Homestead Days. He and a park ranger created Pioneer Days to provide hands on, curriculum-based activities for fourth graders. During Homestead Days, Glen led a team that demonstrated antique farming equipment. They ran a threshing machine with a 1916 steam engine, used horses to power a well driller, mowed and raked hay with horses, and displayed machinery that traced the evolution of farm equipment. They even built a partial log cabin and a partial sod house using antique equipment. Glen’s legacy at Homestead will live on through both his accomplishments and his family members who continue to serve the park and its visitors as volunteers.

In addition, for the first time ever, the Colonel Charles Young Diversity Recognition Award was presented. This award honors the legacy of Young by acknowledging the outstanding accomplishments of those whose efforts in the national park community foster greater appreciation, advancement, and celebration of diversity and inclusiveness in our national parks. The award was given to Robert Stanton, the 15th director of the National Park Service.

As director of the National Park Service and as a trustee of the National Park Foundation’s African American Experience Fund, a fund established by Stanton in 2001, he has worked tirelessly to support and preserve African American history in our national parks.

Photos and additional information about the Hartzog Awards are available at http://www.nps.gov/aboutus/hartzog-awards.htm

Photos and additional information about the Yount Award are available at http://www.nps.gov/aboutus/harry-yount-award.htm

United States Park Police
Park Police Conduct Downed Pilot Training

The United States Park Police Aviation Unit conducted downed pilot training in early June in collaboration with the DC Air National Guard, the U.S. Coast Guard and other public safety agencies.

The training involved a static briefing and demonstration at the “Eagle’s Nest,” the Aviation Unit facility in Anacostia, followed by in-water training in the Potomac River off of Fort Washington Park.

Safety boats, personnel, and instructors were on site in the event of an emergency. Air National Guard members wore GoPro cameras on their chests to show what the in-water evolution looks like.

This training provided Park Police pilots and rescue technicians with the opportunity to practice hoisting people out of water and provided DC Air National Guard members with the chance to see what a water rescue would look like should they need to punch out and find themselves floating in one of the local rivers.

Practice has helped determine that the collapsible rescue basket works better than the Billy Pugh net, which tends to collapse on itself and was not as easy to climb into when the victim is in the water.

For a video of the training, provided by DC Air National Guard Public Affairs, click on the link below.

[Submitted by Lieutenant Simeon Klebaner, Aviation Commander]

 More Information...
Intermountain Region
Karl Cordova Named Superintendent Of Pecos NHP

Karl Cordova, a 20-year veteran of the National Park Service, has been named superintendent of Pecos National Historical Park in northern New Mexico.  Cordova will also oversee the administration of Fort Union National Monument in Watrous, New Mexico.   He will assume his new post on July 15th.

Cordova is currently the superintendent at Casa Grande Ruins and Hohokam Pima National Monuments in Coolidge, Arizona.  He has served in this position since July 2009.

“I am very pleased that Karl will step into this key role at Pecos,” said Intermountain Region Director Sue Masica, who announced Cordova’s appointment. “His ability to collaborate with communities continues our commitment to work with all partners and stakeholders around the parks of our region. Karl is well-suited to engage and work together with them to preserve and interpret the unique cultural and natural resources of Pecos and northern New Mexico.”

Cordova is a 2009 graduate of the NPS’s Bevinetto Congressional Fellowship Program – a distinguished two-year developmental assignment in Washington, D.C., where he worked as a staff member for the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and for the NPS Office of Legislative and Congressional Affairs.  The Bevinetto Fellowship was established in 1988 to improve mutual understanding and cooperation between the National Park Service and Congress, and is considered one of the most effective developmental programs in the NPS.

Cordova is also a 2007 graduate of the NPS Mid-Level Management Development Program – a competency-based management development program that is designed to enhance the competencies needed to become a more effective manager and leader.

“I am honored and humbled to be appointed to this position at Pecos National Historical Park,” says Cordova. “It is a privilege to be able to work with the dedicated park leadership team, staff, and incredible partners and local constituents who care so deeply about the diversity of resources and cultural significance of this place."

Cordova has held various positions with the NPS including acting superintendent at Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site and Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, both in Colorado.  At Rocky Mountain National Park he served as a supervisory biologist and as the park’s lead staff member on the settlement of the Grand Ditch breach lawsuit and the multi-agency Rocky Mountain National Park Nitrogen Deposition Reduction Plan.  He was awarded the park’s 2008 Stewardship Award for his efforts.  Additionally, Cordova worked as a biological science technician, where he supervised landscape restoration and air quality programs, and also served as a wildland firefighter, including a stint with the Alpine Hotshot Interagency Crew.    

He began his NPS career in 1992 as a park planner and ranger at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.  Prior to joining the NPS, Cordova worked as a park ranger for Colorado State Parks.

A native of Pueblo, Colorado, Cordova earned a bachelor’s degree in commercial recreation and tourism and a master’s degree in park and protected area management, both from Colorado State University.  He and his wife Shannon have two sons: Ben, 11, and Ryan, 10.

[Submitted by Patricia Turley, patricia_turley@nps.gov, 303-969-2701]


Canaveral National Seashore (FL)
Kristen Kneifl Selected As Chief Of Resource Management

Kristen Kneifl has been selected as Canaveral National Seashore’s new chief of resource management. She begins her new post on July 27th.

In her new role, Kristen will lead on developing a program that effectively manages the outstanding natural and cultural resources contained in the park.

Kristen received a received a bachelor of science degree in environmental studies from the University of Nebraska. She moved to Florida in 2001 to attend graduate school at Florida Tech and study marine biology. 

Her employment experience includes several years of working in a cellular biology laboratory, several years working for St. John’s River Water Management District conducting seagrass and water quality monitoring, mangrove planting and exotic plant eradication for the Marine Resources Council, and six years as a seasonal biological technician at Canaveral National Seashore.

Kristen began her permanent career with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in 2009 as the biologist for four very different refuges. Three years ago she was promoted as the manager of Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge. 

Canaveral National Seashore has always captivated and held a special place in her heart.   This new position will be just like going “home” for her. 

[Submitted by Edwin Correa]


Servicewide
Upcoming Training Calendar

All training offerings – webinars, online courses and training sessions in the field – appear in this listing only, updated each Friday. Entries must be received by midday Thursday at the latest for the following day’s update. Send them to Bill_Halainen@contractor.nps.gov.

All entries must be brief and should have the following:

  • Beginning and ending dates.
  • Name and location of course.
  • A short one- to two-line description.
  • The closing date for application or registration.
  • Name(s) and number(s) for more information.
  • Most importantly, a link to a website where full announcements or detailed information can be found.

New listings and revisions to this week’s calendar are in bold face. They are removed from the calendar once the application deadline has passed.

*********************************************************************************************************

Training and Webinars

 July 7 – July 10 – NPS Fundamentals V: Building Trust, Teams and Leaders, Washington, DC. Free - all travel/tuition is paid for by WASO Learning & Development. For more information, go to the NPS Fundamentals website (http://www.nps.gov/training/fund/index.htm) and/or contact the Fundamentals V staff at npsfundamentalsdc@nps.gov or 202-354-1903.

July 14 – July 17 – NPS Videography Workshop, NCTC, Shepherdstown, WV. This four-day workshop will be a combination of classroom presentation and hands-on production. The focus will be to prepare participants on how to produce their own video media products that could be used for Servicewide training purposes. Enroll in DOI Learn at this link. For more information, contact Mary Robinson at 304-535-6732 or m_robinson@nps.gov or visit the TEL website at this link: http://www.nps.gov/training/tel/.

July 15 – Retirement Planning for New Employees TEL Broadcast, 1:00-3:30 p.m. Eastern Time. This training is designed to enable employees who are just beginning their careers to plan prudently for their retirement. This class can be viewed via satellite broadcast (TELSAT), video teleconferencing (VTC), or LiveStream. Check the TEL Website or contact Katrina Fritts (katrina_fritts@nps.gov) for additional information.

July 22 – July 23 – NEPA/NHPA Section 106 Workshop:  Intermountain Regional Office, Denver, CO. See full announcement here.  Contact: Cheryl Eckhardt at cheryl_eckhardt@nps.gov or 303-969-2851.

August 4 – August 8 – Fundamentals of Special Park Uses, DOI University, Albuquerque, NM.  This course covers all aspects of special park uses, including First Amendment activities, commercial filming, still photography and rights- of-way. DO-53/RM-53 are covered in depth, as well as 36 CFR and NPS Management Policies 2006. A draft agenda is posted on the special park uses page at http://inside.nps.gov/waso/waso.cfm?prg=185&lv=3  Minimum class size 15 participants.  For more information contact Lee Dickinson, Special Park Uses Program Manager, WASO at 202/513-7092.  Enrollment deadline is July 5th.

August 5 – August 7 – Compliance with Section 106 and NEPA: Southeast Regional Office. See full announcement here.  Contact: Beth Byrd; beth_byrd@nps.gov or 404-507-5793.

August 20 – August 21 – Sig Sauer Armorer Course, Big Cypress NP, FL. The program content focuses on the mechanical functioning, maintenance, troubleshooting, and field repair of the Sig Sauer law enforcement classic pistol line, including the P220, P226, P228, P229, and P239 pistols. This is a hand’s on program that teaches and guides each participant through all armorer operations, step by step with the instructor. To register online please go to www.sigsaueracademy.com. Click on “Courses,” then “Armorer Courses,” then “Sig Sauger Pistols (Classic),” then “Schedule.” Register for “Ochopee.” You can also register by phone by contacting the academy training coordinator at 603-610-3411. For more information, please contact Luke_Conrad@nps.gov. The tuition is $415. The deadline for applying is August 1st.

August 20 – August 22 – Firearms Instructor Refresher Training, CBP Advanced Training Center, Harpers Ferry, WV. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is July 18th.

August 26 – April 27 – Fundamentals of Section 106: Midwest Region, Minneapolis, MN. See full announcement here.  Contact: Stephen Rogers; stephen_rogers@nps.gov or 402-661-1912.

August 26 – August 28 – Fundamentals of Section 106: Pacific West Region, Fort Vancouver NHS. See full announcement here. Contact: Cari Kreshak; cari_kreshak@nps.gov or 808-228-5334.

September 3 – September 5 – Firearms Instructor Refresher Training, FLETC, Belleville, IL. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is July 23rd.

September 8 – September 19 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Instructor Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is July 18th.

September 9 – September 10 – Distance Education Technology Transfer Workshop, Cabrillo NM, San Diego, CA. This course is designed to provide end users (interpreters, education specialists, resource managers, fire managers or information technology staff) with the resources and knowledge necessary to assemble a Telexploration backpack and present a real-time distance learning program to a remote audience and to design and deploy a basic wireless systems sufficient to present real-time live Telexploration programs in your park. The closing date for applications is August 15th. For more information on the workshop, go to this web page: http://seatoshiningsea.org/events_New.html. Contact: Amanda Gossard at amanda_gossard@nps.gov.

September 9 – September 11 – Structural Firefighter Recertification and Refresher Course, Grand Canyon NP, AZ. This three-day class satisfies the refresher requirements for NPS Structural Firefighters as outlined in Chapter 12 of Reference Manual 58, NPS Structural Fire Management. The course is designed to refresh the skills, knowledge and competencies of previously certified structural firefighting personnel through the utilization of live fire scenarios. NPS live fire qualified instructors direct the training in compliance with NFPA 1403 and OSHA requirements. Application deadline is August 11th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

September 15 – September 26 – Basic Tactics Instructor Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is July 18th.

September 15 – October 17 – National Search & Rescue Academy, Camp Navajo, Bellemont. AZ. The National Park Service in conjunction with the Department of Defense will conduct this year’s fall session of the National Search & Rescue Academy at Camp Navajo, which is ten miles west of Flagstaff, Arizona. NSARA provides an intensive five-week comprehensive SAR training program for federal employees. This program will provide participants with a venue to efficiently attain basic field rescuer skills in a single condensed format which typically requires several years of career development. This core program provides participants with essential field rescue skills in ground search operations, ICS, swiftwater rescue, technical rope rescue, search management, basic aviation safety, helicopter rescue techniques, and remote/austere EMS techniques. This program is delivered in the classroom and various physically challenging outdoor environments. To broaden interagency cooperation, allied and federal agency personnel will jointly attend this academy. NSARA participants will be housed in shared military barrack style quarters during the training and are required to adhere to all local policies of the hosting facility. On-site lodging and meals during the academy will be provided at no expense to NPS participants. En route travel and per diem costs, as well lodging and meals associated with three days of off-site swiftwater training, will be borne by the benefiting work unit. This is a very physically demanding course and participants are required to perform at an arduous level without physical, mental, or emotional limitations. Participants will be involved in physical fitness training, which will be completed through the Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test, and participants are required to achieve a “First Class PFT Score” by the end of the academy. Prerequisites: In addition to completion of independent study classes on Basic ICS and SAR, candidates must possess a current minimum certification at the First Responder or Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) level. For further information on this training, refer to the announcement and nomination form at this link. Submit completed nomination forms to NSARA Coordinator Ken Phillips, NPS Branch Chief of Search & Rescue, at ken_phillips@nps.gov or 928-606-3862 (cell). Nominations are due by August 15th.

September 16 – September 17 – NEPA/NHPA Section 106 Workshop: Intermountain Region, Grand Canyon NP. See full announcement here.  Contact: Cheryl Eckhardt; cheryl_eckhardt@nps.gov or 303-969-2851.

September 30 – October 2 – Conference On Preservation And Stewardship Of Historic Places, Yellowstone NP, WY. This conference is for those historic and rustic architecture practitioners who are looking to build new skills and network with professionals and craftspeople in the field. The conference will provide opportunities to learn and exchange ideas through hands-on experiences, classroom presentations and facilitated dialog. Participants can earn up to 16 AIA CEU continuing education credits. The tuition is $395. For more information and to register, go to http://www.preservemontana.org/ynprustic/ .

October 6 – October 10 – Structural Firefighter I (Defensive Firefighter) Course, Gateway NRA (Sandy Hook Unit), NJ. This 40-hour course is designed to provide basic training at the NFPA 1001, Firefighter I level with the minimum skills necessary to function safely and effectively as a member of a structural firefighting team under direct supervision. Course emphasis is on individual and engine company manipulative skills essential for personal safety and efficiency in support of defensive (exterior) operations with limited offensive skills targeting trash and vehicle fires and indirect attacks in the suppression of structural fires. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is September 8th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

October 13 – October 24 – Structural Firefighter I/II Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1001 training standards to be qualified as a Structural Firefighter I and II. Participants will be able to perform both interior and exterior attacks during structural fire events. The course presents students with a strenuous hands-on curriculum that includes extensive training scenarios and live-fire drills. Students will be afforded numerous opportunities to develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed serve as a structural firefighter.  Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is September 15th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

November 3 – November 14 – Fire Apparatus Driver Operator Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1002 training standards to be qualified as Fire Apparatus Driver Operator. The class is designed to provide persons with the technical information and skills essential for the safe operation and proper maintenance of fire apparatus. Emphasis includes hands-on training of pumping and driving skills critical to support personnel assigned to all hazard response. Personnel will become proficient in troubleshooting, hydraulics, drafting and providing water through multiple pumping evolutions. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. Application deadline is October 6th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

November 4 – November 5 – Remington 870 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington 870 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

November 6 – November 7– Remington AR15 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington AR15 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

December 8 – December 12 – Fire Officer and Instructor Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class includes certification in both Fire Instructor I and Fire Officer I. These classes have been combined as fire instructor is a required prerequisite for fire officer. The combined class is a combination of online activities with job performance skills being demonstrated in a class or field setting. Fire instructor is designed around classroom lectures, group activities, and individual presentations. Topics include learning theories, use of instructional materials and media, maintaining student records and techniques for effective communication. The fire officer portion of the class focuses on technical knowledge and leadership skills which are essential for command and control of engine company personnel during fire emergencies. Participants will be introduced to the skills of preplanning, fire attack strategies/tactics and logistical support functions. Skills are reinforced and evaluated through dynamic group sessions and video simulations. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules and class assessments. Access to the on-line class is available on December 9th. Application deadline is November 10th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

Online Training

Web Authoring

NPS Basic Web. The basic course covers the topics that web authors need to effectively communicate via NPS websites—both internal and external. The basic course introduces students to web terminology, content strategy, accessibility, writing for the web, image selection/editing, PDF usage, web analytics, web support, and content management system (CMS) basics. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF2013.

NPS Intermediate Web. The intermediate course builds on topics covered in the basic course (above) to give park or program web coordinators (or any interested web author) resources for managing content on NPS websites. The intermediate course goes into more depth about content strategy, web analytics, accessibility, shared content on NPS.gov, and content management system (CMS) elements. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF4017

Cultural Resources

Nationwide Programmatic Agreement Toolkit. To help guide NPS staff on implementing the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement, which governs Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the NPS has developed a “toolkit.” The toolkit is mandatory training that provides guidance to NPS superintendents and Section 106 coordinators, division chiefs, and facilities staff at region and park levels on using the programmatic agreement during Section 106 review. NPS employees may earn a certificate for their review of the toolkit through DOI Learn by taking a final assessment. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the toolkit website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The toolkit website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/history/howto/PAToolkit/index.htm. For more information about the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement toolkit, please contact: Jeffrey Durbin, NPS Section 106 compliance program officer, at 202-354-1816 or Jeffrey_durbin@nps.gov

Managing Archeological Collections. Learn about caring for archeological collections and help to overcome the curation crisis. The course is designed to assist those who are interested in, or need to learn more about, preserving and managing archeological collections over the long term. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/collections/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Archeology for Interpreters. Through this training, interpreters and anyone with an interest and need to know – including law enforcement rangers, natural resource experts, and managers -- may gain basic knowledge about archeology. The course provides opportunities to learn about archeological methods and analysis and how to encourage concern for the preservation and protection of archeological resources. A park-based case study provides practice. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/AforI/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Interpretation for Archeologists. Archeologists and other resource professionals can take this training to gain a firm foundation in and understanding of the purpose, philosophy, and techniques of interpretation. The course encourages archeologists to frame their work for the public and to work with interpreters to integrate archeological perspectives into interpretive products and tell compelling stories.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/IforA/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Study Tour of Archeological Interpretation. View interpretation with “fresh eyes” to evaluate choices and strategies for interpreting archeology in parks and historic sites. Download worksheets to assist in evaluating both onsite interpretation and virtual visits.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/studytour/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Assessment of Archeological Interpretation. Use the interpretive analysis model to evaluate the effectiveness of interpreting archeological resources on the basis of visitor experience at the levels of short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and audience feedback. Learn more about the National Park Service evaluation strategy. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/aiassess/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Wilderness

The Wilderness Act of 1964. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Writing a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Evaluating a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Deciding to Keep Wilderness Wild: Four Cornerstones for Wilderness Managers. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Stewardship Planning Framework. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Visitor Use Management. A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Strategies, and Monitoring Impacts and Uses.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Natural Resource Management in Wilderness. A suite of twelve courses: Fundamentals, Challenges in Natural Resource Restoration, Monitoring, Evaluating Proposals for Scientific Activity, Fish and Wildlife, Fish and Wildlife Inventory and Monitoring, Threatened and Endangered Species, Air Quality, Soil and Water, Vegetation, Soundscapes, and Night Sky.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Cultural Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this linkfor course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Paleontological Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Retirement

Firefighter/Law Enforcement Officer Retirement Training for Human Resource Specialists, Managers and Supervisors. This course is designed to provide firefighter and law enforcement officer retirement training for human resources specialists, managers and supervisors. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

FERS Retirement Training for Firefighters and Law Enforcement Officers. This course is designed to provide firefighters and law enforcement officers with information on FERS special retirement provisions so that they can manage their careers in such a way that they maximize their benefits. Special retirement provisions apply to employees occupying these positions and they have specific responsibilities that are critical to know about and act upon throughout their careers if they expect to qualify for special retirement. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

Supervision

New Supervisor Development Program. This new training and development program, which was begun last year, is designed specifically for first-time supervisors within the 12 month probationary period of their initial appointment. The New Supervisor Development Program (NSDP) is a blended learning program that is delivered both online and in residential (three day) sessions across the country in collaboration with Bureau of Land Management, and the Fish and Wildlife Service. The online modules (completely free of cost) are available on DOILearn as preliminary work, and include the basics of in knowledge and skills for a first-time supervisor. Completion of these modules is followed by a three day Supervisory Skills Workshop (SSW) that provides synthesis and skills practice. The NSDP satisfies the initial 40-hour new supervisory training required by OPM (5CFR 412.202). There will be no cost to parks and regions in FY 2014 – all costs (tuition and travel) are being funded by WASO Learning and Development. Registrations for the SSW are managed via regional employee development officers by slot allocation.  For more information, please contact Katrina Roberts, NSDP Training Manager, 202-354-1471, or Katherine Callaway, 202-354-1403, or your regional employee development officer.  Additional information can be found at: http://www.nps.gov/training/ - click on Leadership Development Programs.  

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES



Yosemite National Park (CA)
GS-1015-12/13 Museum Curator

Yosemite National Park is seeking candidates for a position as the park’s museum curator.

Click on the link below for a copy of the announcement with full details on duties, area information, and procedures for applying.

It closes on July 16th.

Denver Service Center
GS-1102-11/12 Contract Specialist

Denver Service Center has issued an announcement for several permanent contract specialists.  The announcement is open to all qualified U.S. citizens.

Click on the link below for a copy of the announcement with full details on duties, area information, and procedures for applying.

It closes on July 7th.
 More Information...