The Morning Report

Friday, January 30, 2015

Recent Editions  

INCIDENTS



Rocky Mountain National Park (CO)
Search In Progress For Man Walking Trail Ridge Road

A search is in progress for a New York man who disappeared while attempting to walk over the Rockies on Trail Ridge Road despite warnings from park rangers.

On Monday, January 26th, park rangers contacted Jay Starr Jr, 34, from Cohoes, New York.  Starr had entered Rocky Mountain National Park on foot and said that he was planning to walk westbound over Trail Ridge Road. Rangers advised him against this based on his behavior and his lack of preparedness for winter alpine conditions. Starr was wearing tennis shoes, jeans or tan canvas pants, and a black/blue jacket. He had no hat or gloves and was carrying a plastic grocery bag. 

Trail Ridge Road is the highest continuous paved road in the United States, with its highest point reaching 12,183 feet. Over ten miles of the road are above 11,500 feet. The road closed to vehicles for the season on November 4th. The road is not maintained during the winter.  Conditions on the road range from bare wind-blown asphalt to deep snow drifts. 

On Tuesday afternoon, rangers on skis contacted Starr above Many Parks Curve on Trail Ridge Road. They were concerned for his welfare and were attempting to assist him. Starr fled from the rangers up a dry section of the road, though, and continued to elude rangers until darkness fell. 

Beginning early on Wednesday, two teams of rangers attempted to locate Starr again on the road – one team coming from the east side of the park and the other team from the west side. They faced wind gusts of 50 to 60 miles per hour. These high winds and blowing snow hampered their efforts to follow Starr’s footprints. Aerial operations were not possible due to the high winds. The entire road corridor was checked, but Starr was not located. 

Yesterday, rangers again attempted to locate Starr in areas around Trail Ridge Road.

Rangers have been assisted over the last two days by a Colorado Parks and Wildlife officer with an all-terrain vehicle equipped with snow tracks. Yesterday’s operations were also aided by an over-snow tracked vehicle and operator from Estes Park Power and Light.  The motorized equipment is only being used on Trail Ridge Road. 

Park rangers would like to hear from anyone who might have information on Starr’s whereabouts. Please call (970) 586-1204.

[Submitted by Kyle Patterson, Public Affairs Officer]


NEWS AND NOTES



Fire and Aviation Management
NPS Structural Firefighters Take A Stand For Safety

National Park Service structural firefighters have now joined more than 800 fire departments from around the world in vowing to always wear their seatbelts while riding in fire apparatus.

Started in 2006, the National Fire Service seatbelt pledge was created after the tragic death of firefighter Brian Hunton, who died after falling from his fire truck while responding to a call. Dr. Burton Clark, a distinguished member of the fire service and training specialist at the National Fire Academy, began calling on firefighters to take a pledge to improve their safety by wearing their seatbelts.

The pledge quickly took on a life of its own and received support from the National Fire Academy, International Association of Fire Chiefs, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and the National Fire Protection Association. In 2011, the pledge was adopted by the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation through the Everyone Goes Home® program and is included in the 16 firefighter life safety initiatives, a comprehensive list of steps to reduce firefighter line of duty deaths.

While many departments and agencies have seatbelt policies, too many emergency responders are still being killed in accidents by not wearing their seatbelts. A recent news article reported that a police officer, who was also a volunteer fire chief, was killed after being ejected from his vehicle in a crash that occurred while responding to a house fire.

However, in a similar accident, despite a horrific looking crash, all of the firefighters from a Maryland fire department survived a collision between a responding fire engine and ambulance because they were wearing seatbelts.

“Few would know that motor vehicle crashes are the second leading cause of death for firefighters,” said NPS Structural Fire Chief Hal Spencer. “It is our goal to learn from these incidents to ensure that we are doing everything possible to prevent a tragedy in our parks,”

In recognition of all the NPS structural firefighters who participated in the service-wide call to take the pledge, the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation presented the National Park Service with a certificate at Grand Teton National Park. Rangers, as well as wildland and structural firefighters were in attendance.

“Making this commitment is just one small way our employees continue to place safety first in the workplace,” reports NPS Structural Fire Operations Program Manager Mark Gorman.

More information about the international first responder seatbelt pledge may be found at http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/seatbelts/.

[Submitted by Eric Anderson, eric_anderson@nps.gov, (208) 387-5786]


Wrangell - St Elias National Park & Preserve (AK)
Videos Document Life In Bear Country

Leanne Phelps recently completed a master of science at University College London, preparing a study entitled “Human-bear interaction in the Kennecott Valley, Alaska: Conflict, attitudes, and bear safety.”

She enlisted community members to complete a questionnaire (86 respondents) and conducted 24 structured interviews (14 were video-recorded) about bear conflict, beliefs about bear manageability and behavior, attitudes towards bears, and the use of bear-safety methods.

One of the findings was that, in general, community members who were able to read bear behavior were less likely to take lethal actions against a bear. Based on her findings, she recommends that conflict-mitigation solutions for residents should encourage and foster residents’ ability to read bear behavior.

Phelps has uploaded the four-part video series based on her interviews to YouTube.

The research provides a comprehensive framework for understanding bear-human conflict in the Kennecott Valley. While the research was location-specific, its success in terms of being community-based and informative, suggests that this type of project would be beneficial in other areas where people and bears live.

Leanne Phelps conducted the research with an Alaska Geographic Fellowship, made possible through the Murie Science and Learning Center.

For more information, contact eric_veach@nps.gov

[Submitted by Eric Veach, Chief of Natural & Cultural Resources]


Historical Documentation Programs
Library Of Congress Announces Winner Of 2014 Holland Prize

The Library of Congress and the National Park Service have announced that a drawing of Broadview Park Pavilion in Fort Worth, Texas, by Fort Worth architect Paul M. Dennehy is the 2014 Holland Prize winner.

The Leicester B. Holland Prize recognizes the best single-sheet, measured drawing of a historic building, site or structure prepared to the standards of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) or the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS). It is an annual competition administered by the Heritage Documentation Programs of the National Park Service.

The competition’s jury recommends winners to the Center for Architecture, Design and Engineering in the Library of Congress, which supports the prize through the Paul Rudolph Trust. The trust was established by, and in memory of, the distinguished American architect Paul Rudolph, a proponent of the art of architectural drawing.

Dennehy, vice-president of Dennehy Architects Inc., made his prize-winning drawing of the Broadview Park Pavilion in Fort Worth to HABS specifications. In 1935, the Civilian Conservation Corps had designed and constructed a series of park structures at the western confluence of the Trinity River as it enters Lake Worth. The pavilion is located on an east-facing bluff and offers a commanding view of the lake, parklands and the city of Fort Worth and beyond.

Submissions by Steve Utz of Meadville, Pennsylvania, and Jean-Guy Tanner Dubé of Oxnard, California, are the honorable-mention winners.

Utz submitted a HABS-measured drawing of Bentley Hall at Allegheny College in Meadville, built between 1820 and 1835. Bentley Hall is the first building constructed on the Allegheny College campus, and was designed to hold one of the country’s most impressive library collections, located in a region that, at the time, was at the edge of the nation’s western frontier. Utz is the internship coordinator in the Department of Environment Sciences at Allegheny College.

Dubé submitted a HABS-measured drawing of the Streetcar Depot, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in Los Angeles. Built in 1893, the depot is the sole surviving example of 16-post passenger shelters built by the Southern Pacific Railroad. Dubé is job captain at Appleton & Associates Inc., in Santa Monica, California.

The winner receives a $1,000 cash prize and a certificate of recognition. Honorable-mention recipients each receive a merit award of $500 and certificates of recognition. For information on how to participate in the Leicester B. Holland Prize: A Single-Sheet Measured Drawing Competition, visit www.nps.gov/hdp/competitions/holland.htm.

The prize is intended to increase awareness, knowledge and appreciation of historic sites, structures and landscapes throughout the United States, and to encourage the submission of drawings by professionals and students. All the drawings accepted for the competition will be added to the permanent HABS, HAER and HALS Collection in the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress. Images of many past and present Holland Prize competition drawings are available online. (For maximum detail, open the TIFF files.)

The prize honors Leicester B. Holland (1882-1952), Fellow of the American Institute of Architects (FAIA), chairman of the American Institute of Architects’ Committee on Historic Buildings, head of the Fine Arts Division of the Library of Congress and first curator of the HABS collection, a co-founder of the HABS program in the 1930s, and the first chair of the HABS Advisory Board.

The Center for Architecture, Design and Engineering in the Library of Congress, established by a bequest from the distinguished American architect Paul Rudolph, preserves and makes accessible to the public the Library’s rich collections in those subject areas. For more information, visit www.loc.gov/rr/print/adecenter/adecent.html.

The Library of Congress, the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, holds more than 158 million items in various languages, disciplines and formats. The Library serves the U.S. Congress and the nation both on-site in its reading rooms on Capitol Hill and through its award-winning website at www.loc.gov.

[Submitted by Robert R. Arzola, HABS Architect and Holland Prize Coordinator, robert_arzola@nps.gov, (202) 354-2170]

 More Information...
Grand Teton National Park (WY)
Steve Cain Is Retiring

Steve Cain, senior wildlife biologist at Grand Teton National Park, will retire at the end of January after a 36-year career with both the National Park Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Cain spent the last 26 years of his federal career at Grand Teton, where he accomplished major changes in wildlife and resource management practices and worked closely with federal and state wildlife managers, collaborating on significant programs that span the 22-million-acre Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), the largest intact temperate ecosystem in the world.

During his tenure at Grand Teton, Cain’s outstanding contributions included:

  • research and collaboration to protect the  migration corridor for pronghorn that summer in Grand Teton National Park and winter in the Upper Green River Basin;
  •  monitoring and strategic planning with the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team to help recover the GYE grizzly population;
  • initiation of studies to document the effects of a newly constructed multi-use pathway on bears, birds, and elk;
  • introduction of a non-lead ammunition program for Grand Teton rangers and hunters participating in the annual elk reduction program on park lands;
  • inspiration of a $500,000 donation from the Grand Teton National Park Foundation to support a five-year monitoring program for gray wolves in the park;
  • oversight for establishment of a pika inventory and monitoring project to document the population and track effects of climate change on pikas living in the Teton Range; and
  • long-term studies and monitoring of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and several birds of prey species.

He also authored several peer-reviewed publications on pronghorn migration, bison ecology, and other wildlife issues in Jackson Hole, leading to better awareness of management challenges in the park and surrounding areas.

Throughout his career, Cain collaborated on dozens of other projects with the private sector, academic world, and various government organizations, including assignments in Mexico and Mongolia. In previous positions, Cain coordinated peregrine falcon reintroduction programs for Intermountain Region, studied bald eagles, peregrine falcons, and other bird species throughout Alaska for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, worked as a bear biologist in Yosemite National Park, and researched native salmon and steelhead populations for the State of Oregon. 

Cain has received numerous awards for his work in wildlife conservation, has authored or coauthored dozens of scientific publications on wildlife ecology, and is professionally certified as a wildlife biologist by The Wildlife Society. Among his notable awards are:

  • Wings across the Americas Habitat Conservation Partnership Award from the U.S. Forest Service for outstanding achievement in conservation (2014);
  • NPS Intermountain Regional Director’s Award for excellence in natural resource professionalism (2009); and
  • numerous Special Act Service Awards for work with the NPS and USFWS (1987-2014).

Cain plans to remain in Jackson, Wyoming, and continue to work on wildlife studies and monitoring programs that have been a central part of his professional career and personal interest. He will also continue to hike, ski and explore the backcountry across the GYE.

NPS friends and colleagues can email Steve until January 30th at steve_cain@nps.gov. After January, emails should be sent to stevecain001@gmail.com.  

[Submitted by Jackie Skaggs, Public Affairs Officer]

 More Information...
Pinnacles National Park (CA)
Administrative Officer Leticia Ruiz Is Retiring

Administrative Officer Leticia Ruiz will be retiring on February 3rd after almost 40 years in federal service, all of it in Pinnacles National Park. 

While she is excited to begin a new chapter in her life, she will miss the job, her contribution to park operations, and daily interactions with the staff. 

Leticia grew up in the area and was one of four children born to a hard working farm worker family. Her father was an active participant in the farm workers movement and the United Farm Workers of America (UFW), marching alongside Cesar Chavez.  At a young age, Leticia accompanied her father to boycott activities in his efforts to obtain better wages and working conditions for farm workers. Through her families struggles, she learned about social injustices and has sought to treat all people with dignity and respect.   

She was only 15 years old when she began working in the park in the summer youth program.  She was hired in 1976 as a GS-2 bilingual park aid. In 1980 she was promoted to the GS-4/5 superintendent’s secretary position and then to a GS-5/6/7 administrative technician position through the upward mobility program.  In 1982 she was promoted administrative officer, a position which she has held for 32 years. 

Some of her career highlights include:

  • Serving as a claims officer during the Cerro Grande Fire in New Mexico in May 2000, when over 400 families lost their homes. She prides herself in having been able to provide comfort to some of the people affected.   
  • Meeting President Clinton at the Grand Canyon when she represented Pinnacles during an event to celebrate new land acquisitions around the National Park Service. “It was an honor to exchange a few words with him and shake his hand,” she says.
  • The many opportunities students have been given to move into permanent positions in the park. She participated in many career and job fairs and has always encouraged students and seasonal employees to be patient and never give up their dreams, as there are always opportunities to obtain career positions.

Her future plans include travel with her partner, Jorge, throughout the U.S. in a semi-truck, spending time with her son, Lupe, an art student at San Jose State University, family and friends, and writing short stories about her parents’ lives and her experiences at the Pinnacles.  She plans to come back and enjoy the park as a visitor during the centennial celebration. 

Her kind, easy going demeanor, knowledge base and positive-solution based approach will be missed by all the staff in the park. You are welcome to contact her by email:  let_e@sbcglobal.net

[Submitted by Jan Lemons, Chief Ranger]


Servicewide
Upcoming Training Calendar

All training offerings – webinars, online courses and training sessions in the field – appear in this listing only, updated each Friday. Entries must be received by midday Thursday at the latest for the following day’s update. Send them to Bill_Halainen@contractor.nps.gov.

All entries must be brief and should have the following:

  • Beginning and ending dates.
  • Name and location of course.
  • A short one- to two-line description.
  • The closing date for application or registration.
  • Name(s) and number(s) for more information.
  • Most importantly, a link to a website where full announcements or detailed information can be found.

New listings and revisions to this week’s calendar are in bold face. They are removed from the calendar once the application deadline has passed.

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Learning Event Catalog

The National Park Service now has an interim learning event catalog that will help you find some of those hard to locate learning events.  The catalog is a preview of one of many features yet to come on the new Common Learning Portal – an interactive, collaborative learning and development site scheduled to roll out in early FY16. The learning and development community has compiled a starting list of events offered regionally and Servicewide in FY15. This list is being updated on a biweekly basis as new opportunities arise and current events are updated, so check back regularly. To view the searchable PDF file click here: http://www.nps.gov/training/LD/docs/LD%20Calendar%20-%20FY-2015.pdf

Training and Webinars

February 5 – Managing Human-Bat Encounters in the NPS: Protecting Bats and Human Health, webinar, 12-2:00 pm MST.  Bats are an important part of the landscape at many parks throughout NPS. Recently, the NPS Biological Resource Division, Office of Public Health, and park and regional biologists have received an increased number of inquiries regarding human-bat interactions and the associated human health risks. Because of the significance of bats throughout NPS, we have developed a webinar to discuss how to manage human-bat encounters. This webinar includes a brief overview of bat biology and ecology; importance of bats in the NPS setting; White-Nose Syndrome and other diseases and threats to bats; public health issues related to bat-human encounters, such as rabies and histoplasmosis.  If you have any questions about this training, contact Cara Cherry via email (cara_cherry@nps.gov).  Register for the webinar at the follow link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/510499214707767810 

February 9 – February 12 – Engineering for Historic Timber Framing Workshop, Natchitoches, LA. The National Center for Preservation Technology and Training is partnering with the Preservation Trades Network, the Association for the Preservation Historic Natchitoches, and the Friends of NCPTT to hold a workshop investigating the engineering issues facing historic timber structures. This workshop will bring in preservation engineers, timber framers, site managers, historic building owners, and other parties to discuss best practices for planning and implementing these multi-faceted projects. The focus of these workshops will be African House, which a 200 year low fired brick and timber framed building, located at Melrose Plantation outside of Natchitoches. NCPTT is now offering a reduced registration rate for NPS employees. For more information or to register please visit the training announcement (http://ncptt.nps.gov/events/engineering-for-historic-timber-framing-workshop) or contact Sarah Marie Jackson atsarah_m_jackson@nps.gov or 318-356-7444.

February 10 – February 12 – Introduction to WebEx Training,  2:00 - 4:00 pm ET. Planning on delivering training via WebEx?  Learn how to use the tools of WebEx Training to engage your learners and avoid death by PowerPoint.  This session is reserved for Business Services employees. Register in DOI Learn by January 31st. Contact Jo_Robinson@nps.gov if more information is needed.

February 10 – February 13 – Access to Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, NV. This course is ideal for planners, designers, facility managers and accessibility coordinators.  Learners will apply the accessibility standards to new construction and altered recreation facilities (campgrounds, picnic sites, docks, etc); direct project supervision to ensure compliance with the accessibility standards; and apply universal design concepts to benefit the widest spectrum of park users. 

February 17 – February 19 – Winter EMS, Survival and Skills Training, Sequoia-Kings Canyon NPS, CA. This course is for rangers, researchers, and  EMS/SAR personnel who perform research, snow surveys, and SAR operations in the backcountry in winter.  There is no cost for the training, but participants will need to provide most of their own backcountry gear and food (some extra gear or skis/snowshoes may be available). Time on either end of the training is scheduled to facilitate travel.  The emphasis is on winter EMS skills, travel (skis preferred, snowshoes acceptable), survival and 10-16 hours of BLS or ALS CE's will be provided.  A one night snow camping experience, cold weather EMS CE's, survival skills, and a ski tour through Giant Forest will make this an incredible experience for those who work in a winter environment.  Please contact Jason Ramsdell (Jason_Ramsdell@nps.gov, 559-565-4401) for questions or to enroll.  Space is limited.  

February 18 – Centennial Schedule & Event Planning, webinar, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. Eastern. The Centennial Office is hosting webinars on ways in which employees and partners can learn about NPS preparations for the upcoming centennial. Conference line: 1-888-455-3079; verbal pass code: Planning. Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/119141904 .

February 18 – February 19 – Skills for WebEx Moderators, 2:00 - 4:00 pm ET. In this training, you will learn how to support the instructor on the WebEx Training platform.  Learn to add supplemental class materials, set up polls and monitor learner activity.  This session is reserved for Business Services employees. Register in DOI Learn by February 8th. Contact Jo_Robinson@nps.gov if more information is needed. 

February 19 – NPS Digital Servicewide Call/Webinar, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET. Keep informed about the latest happenings in the NPS digital world on these calls/webinars. They are intended for all NPS staff—web authors, supervisors who manage web resources, and anyone interested in NPS digital efforts. Unless otherwise noted, they are held on the third Thursday of each month at 1 pm ET. The general format includes 40 minutes of material on a variety of digital topics across the NPS (e.g., web, social media, apps, etc.) followed by 20 minutes of questions and answers. Agendas, registration information, and recordings and supporting materials from past calls/webinars are posted on the Digital Community Site (https://sites.google.com/a/nps.gov/web-community/resources/servicewide-calls).

February 23 – February 25 – NREMT Refresher: (Tactical EMS), Independence NHP, Philadelphia, PA.  This is not your traditional EMS refresher. This hands on and dynamic training is designed for law enforcement officers with a primary focus on tactical EMS (TEMS). Over the three days, a variety of instructors (all physicians) will cover the full 24 hours and core topics required by the NREMT. In addition to TEMS, the training will also touch on a wide range of other EMS related topics that hold particular interest to law enforcement, including tactical athlete, K9 down, and WMD/toxins. The training will also feature a highly advanced training mannequin for use throughout the last day for in depth TEMS scenarios.  Class size is limited to 25 students.  This training is expected to fill up fast.  No tuition; travel, tuition and per diem must be paid by the benefiting account.  Restaurant, lodging and travel options in the Philadelphia area are numerous.  The training site in the park is walking distance to hotels and other cultural attractions.  The Hotel Monaco, adjacent to the park, is offering a government rate of $139 based on availability.  Follow the link to make reservations: https://gc.synxis.com/rez.aspx?Hotel=56524&Chain=10179&promo=GFD. For information and course applications, please contact Sinclair_Rehberg@nps.gov.  Applications must be received by February 6th. 

February 23 – February 26 – Live Fire Instructor Class, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, AZ. This four-day class fulfills NFPA 1403 standards to be qualified as a live fire instructor. The 32-hour class focuses on the how-to-aspects of conducting live fire training evolutions in a safe and compliant manner. The course reviews the different types of facilities and props used for live fire training. Agency policies, practices, preparations, training aids and evolutions are given to so that new instructors can learn how to maximize the learning experience of fire fighters and better prepare them for suppression duties. In preparation for the class participants must complete the associated on-line course prior to the first day of field training. Application deadline is January 25th. For more information contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

February 23 – February 27 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Refresher Instructor Training, Tucson, AZ. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is January 5th.

February 24 and 26 – Green Purchasing Webinars, Session 2, Topics 1 & 2, 2 – 3 p.m. ET.  The Sustainable Operations and Climate Change Branch, in collaboration with NPS regional environmental coordinators, will host one-hour webinars to support implementation of environmental purchasing in the parks and regions.  Two topics will be covered – the first will be an introduction to environmental purchasing and the second will examine minimizing climate impacts through greener purchasing choices.   Guest speakers from GOGA, RICH and SAAN will be featured.  Click on this link for the course announcement.  Closed-Captioning for the webinars will be provided upon request. Contact Fred Sturniolo at SOCC (202-513-7078) with any questions.   

February 24 – February 26 – Structural Firefighter Biannual Refresher, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, AZ. This three-day class satisfies the refresher requirements for NPS structural firefighters as outlined in Chapter 10 of Reference Manual 58, NPS Structural Fire Management. The course is designed to refresh the skills, knowledge and competencies of previously certified structural firefighting personnel through the utilization of live fire scenarios. NPS live fire qualified instructors direct the training in compliance with NFPA 1403 and OSHA requirements. Application deadline is January 25th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

February 24 – February 26 – Divine Disorder: Folk and Outsider Art Conference 2015, Atlanta, GA. The National Center for Preservation Technology and Training is partnering with the High Museum of Art, Paradise Gardens Foundation, and the Friends of NCPTT for this conference focused on highlighting the underappreciated decorative works of non-traditional artists. The conservation of these works is vital to preserving the life story of those artists outside the main stream art community. For more information or to register please visit the training announcement (http://ncptt.nps.gov/blog/divine-disorder-2015/) or contact Jason Church at jason_church@contractor.nps.gov or 318-356-7444.

February 24 – February 26Divine Disorder; Conference on the Conservation of Folk and Outsider Art, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA. This conference is focused on highlighting the underappreciated decorative works of non-traditional artists. The conservation of these works is vital to preserving the life story of those artists outside the mainstream art community. For more information, go to the event webpage at http://ncptt.nps.gov/blog/divine-disorder-2015/; or contact Jason Church: 318-356-7444 or jason_church@contractor.nps.gov.

February 28 – FMLP Mentors Program, application deadline. This year-long course requires attendance at three classroom sessions with instruction and practical application of supervision and leadership topics. The latest advances in facilities management will be reviewed, providing the mentors with sufficient knowledge to assist in their protégé’s development. Instruction in writing skills and techniques of mentoring will be included. The program is also designed to assist with an individual’s professional growth through the application of mentoring skills such as communication, lateral leadership, and critical analysis of written materials. Applicants should register for the FMLP Mentors Program-Supervision Practices in Facility Management on DOI Learn.  The course can be found at this link.  Once you have registered you will be sent an application by email.  Complete the application and return it to Mark Tezel by February 28th.  Mentors will be selected in March. For more information, contact either of the following: Sandy Pusey-Cameron, Asset Management Training Lead (202-997-7317, sandy_pusey@nps.gov ) or Mark Tezel, Asset Management Training Coordinator (202-431-7409, mark_tezel@nps.gov).

March 2 – March 5 – Parkmedic Refresher, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Gatlinburg, TN. This course is led by instructors from Roane State Community College and meets National Registry transition standards from Parkmedic/ I-85 to Advanced EMT.  This is a 36 hour transition course; cost is $100 and it is open to any National Park Service Parkmedic.  After completion, candidates are eligible to register for National Registry practical and cognitive testing in order to complete the transition to Advanced EMT.  For more information and/or to register, call KK Stuart at 828-497-1914 or email at kathleen_stuart@nps.gov.

March 9 – March 13 – Fundamentals Of Special Park Uses, NCTC, Shepherdstown, WV. The 36-hour course covers all aspects of special park uses from First Amendment to commercial filming and still photography to wireless telecommunication facilities. Also included is a component on temporary food services and other health and safety issues related to special park uses. DO-53/RM-53 is covered in depth, as well as 36 CFR and NPS Management Policies 2001. For more information contact Lee Dickinson, Special Park Uses Program Manager, WASO at 202-513-7092.

March 9 – March 20 – Law Enforcement Fitness Coordinator Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is January 12th.

March 10 – March 12 – EMT Refresher, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Gatlinburg, TN. Also includes National Registry skills verification on March 13th. This course will meet National Registry requirements for a 24 hour EMT refresher and transition from EMT-Basic to EMT.  Instruction is provided by Roane State Community College.  Cost is $75.  An extra day for the skills review/verification is scheduled for Friday, March 13th.  Cost for this is $25. This refresher will be held at the Sugarlands Training room next to the Sugarlands Visitor Center.  For more information and/or to register, call KK Stuart at 828-497-1914 or email kathleen_stuart@nps.gov.

March 10 – March 12 – Structural Firefighter Biannual Refresher, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park, CA. This three-day class satisfies the refresher requirements for NPS structural firefighters as outlined in Chapter 10 of Reference Manual 58, NPS Structural Fire Management. The course is designed to refresh the skills, knowledge and competencies of previously certified structural firefighting personnel through the utilization of live fire scenarios. NPS live fire qualified instructors direct the training in compliance with NFPA 1403 and OSHA requirements. Application deadline is February 8th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

March 11 – March 12 – Skills for WebEx Moderators, 2:00 - 4:00 pm ET. In this training, you will learn how to support the instructor on the WebEx Training platform.  Learn to add supplemental class materials, set up polls and monitor learner activity.  Register in DOI Learn by March 1st.  Contact Jo_Robinson@nps.gov if more information is needed. 

March 16 – March 20 – Interdisciplinary Resource Protection and Law, Anchorage, AK. This course provides employees with a solid understanding of the resource mission of the NPS and the primary laws, legal authorities, case law interpretation, and policies used to protect park resources. Participants will also receive instruction in the functions and roles that contribute to effective interdisciplinary group work and practice these skills through resource protection case studies. The deadline for application has been extended to February 6th. Priority will be given to participants from Alaska. Travel scholarships to help defray costs are available for participants from Alaska only, but must be submitted by February 6th. For the full announcement and scholarship application, go to the Natural Resource Stewardship Training webpage. For more information about the course, please contact Jeri Hall, jeri_hall@nps.gov; or Cathy Purchis, cathy_purchis@nps.gov.

March 16 – March 20 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Refresher Instructor Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is January 30th.

March 18 – Getting Ready for Campaign Launch, Part II, webinar, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. Eastern. The Centennial Office is hosting webinars on ways in which employees and partners can learn about NPS preparations for the upcoming centennial. Conference line: 1-888-455-3079; verbal pass code: Service. Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/743189369 .

March 19 – NPS Digital Servicewide Call/Webinar, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET. Keep informed about the latest happenings in the NPS digital world on these calls/webinars. They are intended for all NPS staff—web authors, supervisors who manage web resources, and anyone interested in NPS digital efforts. Unless otherwise noted, they are held on the third Thursdayof each month at 1 pm ET. The general format includes 40 minutes of material on a variety of digital topics across the NPS (e.g., web, social media, apps, etc.) followed by 20 minutes of questions and answers. Agendas, registration information, and recordings and supporting materials from past calls/webinars are posted on the Digital Community Site (https://sites.google.com/a/nps.gov/web-community/resources/servicewide-calls).

March 24 – March 26Fiber Identification and Analysis for Conservation, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Houston, TX. This course covers basic polarized light microscopy (PLM) and methods of sampling, characterization and identification mammalian hair and selected natural and synthetic fibers. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on exercises involving sample preparation and specimen manipulation as well as the characterization and identification of real life specimens. For more information go to the event webpage at http://ncptt.nps.gov/events/fiber-identification-and-analysis-for-conservation/; or contact Jason Church: 318-356-7444 or jason_church@contractor.nps.gov.

March 24 – March 27 – Fee Supervisors Training Workshop, National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, WV. Recreation fee program managers, supervisors, and collateral duty employees with daily responsibilities for a fee program operation are encouraged to attend. The four-day course covers the essential competencies developed for fee supervisors including: supervising employees, making effective visitor contacts, collecting and accounting for fees, preparing remittance reports/deposits, disseminating information, analyzing business practices, cost of collection, and internal controls. Those attending will receive 20 hours of supervisory training. Register by February 20th through DOILearn - Course Code: NPS-ADM3002. Tuition, travel and per diem are paid by the benefiting account. For more information, click on this link.

March 24 – April 4 – Structural Firefighter I/II Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1001 training standards to be qualified as a structural firefighter I and II. Participants will be able to perform both interior and exterior attacks during structural fire events. The course presents students with a strenuous hands-on curriculum that includes extensive training scenarios and live-fire drills. Students will be afforded numerous opportunities to develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed serve as a structural firefighter.  Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is March 1st. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.   

March 25 – March 27 - International Workshop on the Conservation and Restoration of Earthen Architecture or TICRAT (Taller Internacional de Conservación y Restauración de Arquitectura de Tierra), Alamos, Mexico. This workshop series is a bi-national, hands-on event focused on techniques and strategies for conserving and restoring earthen architecture and components such as adobe, lime plaster, and painted plaster. This year’s event will involve presentations, workshops, and field trips in and around Alamos Sonora, a well-preserved 17th century Spanish Colonial town located in the tropical deciduous forest of Mexico’s Sierra Madre Mountains. All costs for selected NPS employees, including transportation between the home park unit and Alamos, hotel, local travel, and meals will be provided. NPS staff participation is limited to 15 and requires preliminary registration to ensure equitable representation from multiple parks. Final registration will require a passport and superintendent-approved international travel authorization form. Preliminary registration is due by December 1st. To register contact Starr Herr-Cardillo, TICRAT coordinator, at (520) 271-3014 or seherr@email.arizona.edu. For copies of the flyer and registration form, got to http://www.nps.gov/tuma/historyculture/ticrat.htm. For more information, visit the Missions Initiative website, www.missions.arizona.edu.

April 6 – April 10 – NPS Basic Technical Rescue Training – West, Island-In-The-Sky District, Canyonlands NP, Moab, UT. This training course is designed for personnel who routinely evacuate injured or stranded persons from heights and vertical terrain.  The course will provide participants with the skills to perform difficult technical rope-based rescues. Students will be required to bring personal technical rescue gear, including seat harness, climbing helmet, carabiners, rappel rack, ascenders, etc.  This is a very physically demanding course conducted outdoors with frequent exposure to severe heights and extreme environmental conditions.  All participants must be in good physical condition.  This training includes a night rescue training exercise.  Commercial lodging is available in Moab. Class size is limited and subject to funding, registration will be conducted on a first come first served basis, with priority to NPS employees who are actively involved with high angle rescue work. Target participants include permanent or seasonal employees who participate in a technical rescue program.  All participants must be covered in official duty status by their agency during the training, in the event of accident or injury. A $200 registration fee is required to cover training course administrative costs.  All participant travel and per diem expenses covered by benefiting account. The registration deadline is Friday, March 20th. For more information, contact Ken Phillips, NPS Branch Chief of Search and Rescue at 928-606-3862 (cell) or ken_phillips@nps.gov. Click on this link for a copy of the training form.

April 17 – Introduction to the Planning, Environment and Public Comment System (PEPC), Upper Mammoth, Yellowstone NP, WY. This instructor-led course will provide a hands-on introduction to the PEPC system. The course will cover menu navigation, project search/tracking, reporting capabilities, resource tools and customization for your park/unit. Students will create a project in PEPC, enter the funding status, set up an interdisciplinary team, fill out an Environmental Screening Form (ESF), set up a NEPA/NHPA pathway, create a document for internal review, create a public project page, post a public document, review public correspondence, and close a project. For more information, contact Shannon Kruse, shannon_kruse@nps.gov, (970) 267-2131. Register in DOI Learn by March 20th. Complete announcement available here.

April 20 – May 1 – Fire Apparatus Driver Operator Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1002 training standards to be qualified as fire apparatus driver operator. The class is designed to provide persons with the technical information and skills essential for the safe operation and proper maintenance of fire apparatus. Emphasis includes hands-on training of pumping and driving skills critical to support personnel assigned to all hazard response. Personnel will become proficient in troubleshooting, hydraulics, drafting and providing water through multiple pumping evolutions. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is March 22nd. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

April 27 – May 1 – NPS Basic Technical Rescue Training—East, Acadia NP, ME. This course is designed for persons tasked with extricating victims in high angle environments, such as cliffs, canyons, urban situations, and to some degree, caves.  All students should be in good physical condition, as there will be long days spent training outdoors, hiking with heavy loads, and often hanging on ropes for extended periods in very exposed settings. The course places a high premium on safety throughout the week, utilizing an ICS structure, applying Operational Leadership principles, and maintaining an instructor to student ratio of 1:3, and in some cases, 1:2. The instructor cadre has a wealth of experience and comes from a highly varied background, including veteran NPS rangers, maintenance workers, interpreters, resource management specialists and firefighters; military special operations personnel, such as Navy SEALs and Air Force PJs; certified climbing instructors and guides; a Maine State Parks ranger; veteran cavers; and tree surgeons. Optional after-hours presentations will be offered most evenings and will covers subjects such as a recent expedition to study the ice caves under Oregon’s Mt. Hood, cutting-edge lightweight mountaineering rescue techniques, and possible demonstrations from leaders in the climbing and cliff rescue industries. Loging will be in a dorm facility operated by a licensed Acadia NP concessioner.  There is zero tuition for attending the course, but there will be a small lodging fee of $5 per night per person for those who will be staying on site at the dorms.  Attendees will be able to cook meals on site, as well, at the dorm’s large group kitchen, and thus can eat affordably by utilizing the option of purchasing groceries for the week.  Student slots will be limited to 36, and will be on a first come-first served basis, with priority given to NPS employees and volunteers who are actively involved with high angle rescue work at their home parks.  Persons interested in attending this year’s course should contact the course incident commander, Middle Buffalo District Ranger Kevin Moses from Buffalo National River.  He can be reached at 870-688-0905 or kevin_moses@nps.gov, and he will send a training nomination form and associated information.  The cadre is hoping to fill the class by mid to late February, so apply early.

April 28 – April 29 – Landscape Preservation: An Introduction, Sitka National Historical Park, Sitka, AK. This training introduces students to the concept of cultural landscapes, including designed, vernacular, and ethnographic landscapes and historic sites.  Student then learn applicable laws and regulations, and discuss how to identify and inventory character-defining features of a landscape. Instructors then explore preservation planning and documentation, and how to develop a cultural landscape report to use in managing historic and cultural landscapes. Case studies illustrate realistic approaches to effective landscape management and preservation. Applications are due by April 14th. Details on the seminar can be found on the National Preservation Institute website (www.npi.org).  For more information, contact Brinnen Carter at 907-747-0140, or Brinnen_Carter@nps.gov.

April 28 – April 30 – Resource Advisor (READ) Training Course, Yosemite NP, CA. The class will provide participants with the foundation to serve as READs during wildland fire incidents. READs generally work with fire managers to convey concerns about natural, cultural, and wilderness resources. The course benefits from having a mix of agencies, state, tribal and other representatives, as well as all cultural and natural resource disciplines. There is no training cost. For further information, see the announcement at this link or contact Jun Kinoshita at jun_r_kinoshita@nps.gov.

April 30 – Landscape Preservation: Advanced Tools for Managing Change, Sitka National Historical Park, Sitka, AK. Students will explore issues that direct the process of change and decision-making for challenging landscapes. Instructors will then review the practices of inventorying, evaluating, treating, and maintaining landscape resources and discuss the implications of each, identifying tools and techniques for managing change when difficult issues affect the process. Students should come to understand the philosophical foundations for making sound, educated decisions about preserving and managing historic and cultural landscapes over the long-term. Applications are due by April 14th. Details on the seminar can be found on the National Preservation Institute website (www.npi.org).  For more information, contact Brinnen Carter at 907-747-0140, orBrinnen_Carter@nps.gov.

May 4 – May 8 – Archeological Resources Protection Training, Gettysburg NMP, Gettysburg, PA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is March 13th.

May 4, 2015 – April 15, 2016 – Facility Manager Leaders Program. This national award winning curriculum is designed to develop and strengthen selectees’ knowledge and competencies in asset management, operations and maintenance, project management, resource stewardship, business management, supervision and leadership. This is a competency based training opportunity; it is not an intake program.  Selected candidates will be enrolled in an intensive year-long program involving 20 to 28 weeks of study, classes and activities. To apply, log onto DOI Learn and enter “Facility Manager Leaders Program” in the search field. IMPORTANT: All six parts of the on-line application must be completed no later than January 16th. For additional information, contact Mark Tezel at (202) 431-7409.

August 3 – August 7 – Fundamentals Of Special Park Uses, Albuquerque, NM. The 36-hour course covers all aspects of special park uses from First Amendment to commercial filming and still photography to wireless telecommunication facilities. Also included is a component on temporary food services and other health and safety issues related to special park uses. DO-53/RM-53 is covered in depth, as well as 36 CFR and NPS Management Policies 2001. For more information contact Lee Dickinson, Special Park Uses Program Manager, WASO at 202-513-7092.

September 9 – September 11 – Structural Firefighter Biannual Refresher, Glacier National Park, MT. This three-day class satisfies the refresher requirements for NPS Structural Firefighters as outlined in Chapter 10 of Reference Manual 58, NPS Structural Fire Management. The course is designed to refresh the skills, knowledge and competencies of previously certified structural firefighting personnel through the utilization of live fire scenarios. NPS live fire qualified instructors direct the training in compliance with NFPA 1403 and OSHA requirements. Application deadline is August 9th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

October 12 – October 23 – Structural Firefighter I/II Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1001 training standards to be qualified as a structural firefighter I and II. Participants will be able to perform both interior and exterior attacks during structural fire events. The course presents students with a strenuous hands-on curriculum that includes extensive training scenarios and live-fire drills. Students will be afforded numerous opportunities to develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed serve as a structural firefighter.  Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is August 23rd. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.    

November 2 – November 7 – Fire Officer and Instructor Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, (location to be determined). This class includes certification in both fire instructor I and fire officer I. These classes have been combined as fire instructor is a required prerequisite for fire officer. The class is a combination of online activities with job performance skills being demonstrated in a class or field setting. Fire instructor is designed around classroom lectures, group activities, and individual presentations. Topics include learning theories, use of instructional materials and media, maintaining student records and techniques for effective communication. The fire officer portion of the class focuses on technical knowledge and leadership skills which are essential for command and control of engine company personnel during fire emergencies. Participants will be introduced to the skills of preplanning, fire attack strategies/tactics and logistical support functions. Skills are reinforced and evaluated through dynamic group sessions and video simulations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is October 4th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

Online Training

Web Authoring

NPS Basic Web. The basic course covers the topics that web authors need to effectively communicate via NPS websites—both internal and external. The basic course introduces students to web terminology, content strategy, accessibility, writing for the web, image selection/editing, PDF usage, web analytics, web support, and content management system (CMS) basics. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF2013.

NPS Intermediate Web. The intermediate course builds on topics covered in the basic course (above) to give park or program web coordinators (or any interested web author) resources for managing content on NPS websites. The intermediate course goes into more depth about content strategy, web analytics, accessibility, shared content on NPS.gov, and content management system (CMS) elements. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF4017

Natural Resources

Introduction to the Career Academy for Natural Resources. This two-hour on-line training orients learners to the natural resource and science career path within the National Park Service. It explains the role of the natural resource professional within the NPS, and introduces the concepts of ethical conduct, scientific integrity, interdisciplinary networks and building and maintaining professional credibility. Students will address their career development by exploring ways to design and implement professional development plans. Introduction to the Career Academy for Natural Resources is the first unit in the course of study being developed for the Foundational Natural Resource series of the Career Academy for Natural Resources. The Foundational Series is designed to help employees achieve the natural resource competencies at the entry/developmental level. It may also benefit natural resource professionals at any level who are new to the National Park Service. This course is available through DOI Learn. The course code is NPS-NRS1501. Cost: Free. To learn more about the Career Academy for Natural Resources, visit the website at http://www.nps.gov/training/nrs/academy/academy.html. For more information, please contact Jeri Hall, jeri_hall@nps.gov.

Introduction to Air Resources. Every unit in the national park system has air resources, but, because air is invisible and easily crosses park boundaries, many people do not think of it as a resource that the park service manages. This two-hour on-line training provides employees from any division with a basic understanding of what air resources are, why they are important, and the laws, regulations and policies that guide and govern their management. The course will also introduce the science of air pollution, air quality monitoring, and some of the air-related issues faced by parks throughout the service, including several in-depth case studies. It will provide learners with resources to explore air quality and management issues at their own unit, and sources for more in-depth information and assistance in dealing with specific problems. The course is part of the Career Academy for Natural Resources, and is the first of a planned series of on-line learning opportunities designed to provide NPS employees with an introduction to specific natural resources and natural resource issues. These courses are intended for natural resource employees at the entry/developmental level, and for anyone who wishes to learn more about natural resources within the national park system. This course is available through DOI Learn. The course code is NPS-NRS1503. Cost: Free. To learn more about the Career Academy for Natural Resources, visit the website at this link. For more information, please contact Jeri Hall, jeri_hall@nps.gov.

Cultural Resources

Nationwide Programmatic Agreement Toolkit. To help guide NPS staff on implementing the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement, which governs Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the NPS has developed a “toolkit.” The toolkit is mandatory training that provides guidance to NPS superintendents and Section 106 coordinators, division chiefs, and facilities staff at region and park levels on using the programmatic agreement during Section 106 review. NPS employees may earn a certificate for their review of the toolkit through DOI Learn by taking a final assessment. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the toolkit website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The toolkit website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/history/howto/PAToolkit/index.htm. For more information about the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement toolkit, please contact: Jeffrey Durbin, NPS Section 106 compliance program officer, at 202-354-1816 or Jeffrey_durbin@nps.gov

Managing Archeological Collections. Learn about caring for archeological collections and help to overcome the curation crisis. The course is designed to assist those who are interested in, or need to learn more about, preserving and managing archeological collections over the long term. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/collections/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Archeology for Interpreters. Through this training, interpreters and anyone with an interest and need to know – including law enforcement rangers, natural resource experts, and managers -- may gain basic knowledge about archeology. The course provides opportunities to learn about archeological methods and analysis and how to encourage concern for the preservation and protection of archeological resources. A park-based case study provides practice. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/AforI/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Interpretation for Archeologists. Archeologists and other resource professionals can take this training to gain a firm foundation in and understanding of the purpose, philosophy, and techniques of interpretation. The course encourages archeologists to frame their work for the public and to work with interpreters to integrate archeological perspectives into interpretive products and tell compelling stories.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/IforA/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Study Tour of Archeological Interpretation. View interpretation with “fresh eyes” to evaluate choices and strategies for interpreting archeology in parks and historic sites. Download worksheets to assist in evaluating both onsite interpretation and virtual visits.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/studytour/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Assessment of Archeological Interpretation. Use the interpretive analysis model to evaluate the effectiveness of interpreting archeological resources on the basis of visitor experience at the levels of short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and audience feedback. Learn more about the National Park Service evaluation strategy. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/aiassess/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Wilderness

The Wilderness Act of 1964. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Writing a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Evaluating a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Deciding to Keep Wilderness Wild: Four Cornerstones for Wilderness Managers. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Stewardship Planning Framework. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Visitor Use Management. A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Strategies, and Monitoring Impacts and Uses.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Natural Resource Management in Wilderness. A suite of twelve courses: Fundamentals, Challenges in Natural Resource Restoration, Monitoring, Evaluating Proposals for Scientific Activity, Fish and Wildlife, Fish and Wildlife Inventory and Monitoring, Threatened and Endangered Species, Air Quality, Soil and Water, Vegetation, Soundscapes, and Night Sky.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Cultural Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this linkfor course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Paleontological Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Retirement

Firefighter/Law Enforcement Officer Retirement Training for Human Resource Specialists, Managers and Supervisors. This course is designed to provide firefighter and law enforcement officer retirement training for human resources specialists, managers and supervisors. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

FERS Retirement Training for Firefighters and Law Enforcement Officers. This course is designed to provide firefighters and law enforcement officers with information on FERS special retirement provisions so that they can manage their careers in such a way that they maximize their benefits. Special retirement provisions apply to employees occupying these positions and they have specific responsibilities that are critical to know about and act upon throughout their careers if they expect to qualify for special retirement. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

Supervision

New Supervisor Development Program. This new training and development program, which was begun last year, is designed specifically for first-time supervisors within the 12 month probationary period of their initial appointment. The New Supervisor Development Program (NSDP) is a blended learning program that is delivered both online and in residential (three day) sessions across the country in collaboration with Bureau of Land Management, and the Fish and Wildlife Service. The online modules (completely free of cost) are available on DOILearn as preliminary work, and include the basics of in knowledge and skills for a first-time supervisor. Completion of these modules is followed by a three day Supervisory Skills Workshop (SSW) that provides synthesis and skills practice. The NSDP satisfies the initial 40-hour new supervisory training required by OPM (5CFR 412.202). There will be no cost to parks and regions in FY 2014 – all costs (tuition and travel) are being funded by WASO Learning and Development. Registrations for the SSW are managed via regional employee development officers by slot allocation.  For more information, please contact Katrina Roberts, NSDP Training Manager, 202-354-1471, or Katherine Callaway, 202-354-1403, or your regional employee development officer.  Additional information can be found at: http://www.nps.gov/training/ - click on Leadership Development Programs.  

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES



Great Smoky Mountains National Park
GS-0025-15 Park Manager (Assistant Superintendent)

Dates: 01/27/2015 - 02/09/2015

Great Smoky Mountains National Park is seeking applicants for the position of Assistant Superintendent (GS15). 

If interested, please apply through USA Jobs.  Do not apply directly to the park; click on the link below for a copy of the announcement.

Please contact Beverly Slaybaugh in Southeast Region's North SHRO at beverly_slaybaugh@nps.gov or 865-436-1273 for more information on this position.

[Submitted by Beverly Slaybaugh, beverly_slaybaugh@nps.gov, 865-436-1273]

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Flagstaff Area Monuments - AZ
GS-0193-11 Archaeologist (Lateral)

The Flagstaff Area National Monuments are seeking an NHPA 106 compliance archaeologist to join their resources management team. The person in this position will serve as the lead compliance and planning program manager for the three Flagstaff Area National Monuments – Sunset Crater Volcano, Walnut Canyon and Wupatki.

A strong background in NHPA 106 compliance is essential. Applicants must have the ability to oversee the day-to-day federal undertakings by conducting archaeological surveys, inputting data into an archaeology geodatabase, completing PEPC (planning, environment and public comment system) documents, organizing and leading IDTs as needed, and consulting with the Coconino National Forest Service, the SHPO and the 13 tribes traditionally associated with the monuments.  Sunset Crater Volcano has administrative buildings on Forest Service lands. 

Supervision is not necessary, as this person will be working mostly on his/her own, yet closely with the division chief. Knowledge and or experience with NEPA, GIS, wilderness designations and the NPS research permitting system are preferred.   

The Flagstaff monuments are popular destinations for visitors going to and from the Grand Canyon, Sedona, and the Utah parks. Walnut Canyon is eight miles east of Flagstaff, Sunset Crater Volcano is 12 miles north of Flagstaff and Wupatki is about 35 miles north of Flagstaff (about a 60 minute drive from Flagstaff).

Summers in Flagstaff are warm, with temperatures in the 80’s and frequent monsoon thunderstorms. Winters are cold, with low temperatures near zero and snow averaging around 90 inches. Flagstaff offers complete medical, dental and shopping services, along with excellent educational opportunities at Northern Arizona University and Coconino Community College. The surrounding desert, mountains and lakes provide varied recreational opportunities.

This position is permanent, subject to furlough. Government housing is not available. Finding affordable housing/rentals in Flagstaff can be challenging; options may be limited. Relocation expenses are authorized.

If interested, please submit the following electronically to lisa_leap@nps.gov, or by mail to Lisa M. Leap, Chief of Resources, Flagstaff Area National Monuments, 6400 N. Highway 89, Flagstaff, AZ 86004:

  • Current resume
  • Copy of your most recent performance appraisal.
  • Current copy of SF-50, Notification of Personnel Action, documenting permanent competitive civil service status, current title, series, grade, and step.

Application materials will be accepted until February 13th.  For more information about the Flagstaff Area National Monuments please visit www.nps.gov/sucrwww.nps.gov/waca, and www.nps.gov/wupa or contact Lisa Leap at 928-526-1157x222 or lisa_leap@nps.gov.

Intermountain Region
GS-1640-12 Supervisory Facility Operations Specialist

Dates: 01/29/2015 - 02/09/2015

Dinosaur National Monument in Colorado/Utah has issued an announcement for a supervisory facility operations specialist. This position is open to National Park Service career or career-conditional employees and closes on Monday, February 9th.

Click on the link below for a copy of the announcement with full details on duties, area information, and procedures for applying.

For more information about the position, please call Superintendent Mark Foust at 970-374-3001.

[Submitted by Tracey Stills, HR Specialist, tracey_stills@nps.gov, 303.969.2774]

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