The Morning Report

Friday, February 27, 2015

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INCIDENTS



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NEWS AND NOTES



Alcatraz Island (CA)
Students Join In Effort To Control Powder Post Beetles

This past Valentine’s Day, 24 entomology students from the University of California at Davis and their professor showed their love of the historic structures on Alcatraz Island by volunteering their time to place 300 detection blocks to help monitor and control the powder post beetles that infest the world famous buildings.

Powderpost beetles invade structural and decorative wood along with wood furniture.  The female beetle lays multiple eggs in wood and her hatched young consume large amounts of the wood as food.

The UC Davis entomology students have been working with Bruce Badzik, Golden Gate NRA’s integrated pest management coordinator, to survey and document the beetle infestation. The detection blocks serve a dual purpose – they provide real-time monitoring devices and they act as a management technique. When it is found that a block is infested with the eggs of the beetle, the block is disposed of, thus reducing the active beetle population.

Even with the mandatory three-hour safety training , which the students did on their own time, and the 5:00 a.m. departure time from Davis, there is a long waiting list of students wanting to participate in the Alcatraz project, as it provides them real-world experience in entomology and the satisfaction of helping preserve a national park.

[Submitted by Alexandra Picavet, Public Affairs Specialist]


Alaska Region
Kachemak Bay Water Trail Project Receives Award

The NPS Alaska Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance (RTCA) program has announced that a recent RTCA project, the Kachemak Bay Water Trail, has been selected to receive a 2015 Project Excellence Award from the Society of Outdoor Recreation Professionals.

The Kachemak Bay Water Trail is a 125-mile water trail that inspires exploration and wise stewardship of the natural treasure that is Kachemak Bay. It extends from Homer north to the head of the Bay and back along the south side to Seldovia. For more information about the Kachemak Bay Water Trail, and to plan your own visit, see the trail website at http://www.kachemakbaywatertrail.org/

Creating the water trail was a true collaborative process. It began in 2011, when Dave Brann, a Homer trails advocate, came up with the idea of a water trail connecting communities around Kachemak Bay. Dave rallied others and soon established a committee of ten enthusiastic community volunteers to lead the planning process. Recognizing that it would be a major undertaking and additional expertise was needed, the committee requested and received assistance from RTCA staff, who provided overall guidance and hands-on help throughout the three year planning process.

Multiple other entities also were instrumental in making the Kachemak Bay Water Trail a reality, including (to name a few): the Cities of Homer and Seldovia and associated parks and recreation committees, Homer and Seldovia Chambers of Commerce, Alaska State Parks, Alaska Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects, Kachemak Bay Wooden Boat Society, Kenai Peninsula Borough, NOAA – National Ocean Service/Kasitsna Bay Laboratory, Alaska Trails, Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, and Friends of Kachemak Bay State Park.

On June 6, 2014, two ribbon cutting ceremonies, one in Homer and one in Seldovia, inaugurated the Kachemak Bay Water Trail. At each site, a brass plaque was unveiled commemorating the trail as a Department of the Interior’s America’s Great Outdoors project. Of the value of collaboration and partnerships, Dave Brann said: “Ideas are just ideas until people, organizations and agencies come together in partnership to make something great happen. The power of a partnership is demonstrated in the realization of the Kachemak Bay Water Trail.”

The Society of Outdoor Recreation Professionals is the nation’s leading association of outdoor recreation and related professionals. Michael Bradley, SORP Awards Committee Chair, wrote, “Each year, the SORP Board of Directors presents this prestigious award to select individuals and/or planning teams contributing to exemplary outdoor recreation projects. SORP believes the efforts by the Kachemak Bay Water Trail Association for the Kachemak Bay Water Trail is worthy of recognition.” The award will be formally presented at the National Outdoor Recreation Conference on April 14, 2015.

[Submitted by John Quinley, john_quinley@nps.gov, 907 644 3512]

 More Information...
Sitka National Historical Park (AK)
Park Staff Take On Cleanup Of BLM Site

When power in the area went out on February 4th, the resource division at Sitka NHP took the opportunity to spend the day cleaning the Bureau of Land Management’s blockhouse site.

After recent community discussions about the blockhouse on Kaagwaantaan Street, Sitka NHP staff visited the site and realized that some basic maintenance had not been performed there for a while. A crew was recruited, and, when the power went out, the opportunity presented itself to exit the office, leave the computers and paperwork behind, and clean up the site. 

Crew members included National Park Service volunteers Kelsey Brunasso and Elizabeth Wessels and three staff members. 

In an hour and a half on the blockhouse site, the crew scrubbed clean the three waysides and removed 30 pounds of litter from BLM property and the access route through the Orthodox Church in America property.  Items removed included broken glass, bottles, cans, and paper and plastic litter.  The crew also removed a deteriorated pallet from the site. 

The current blockhouse was constructed on the BLM parcel using National Park Service funds in 1962, replacing a similar, reconstructed blockhouse that stood on the shoreline of Sitka NHP prior to 1962 but was removed by park managers. 

At the time, community concern about the removal of the blockhouse from the park prompted the National Park Service to work with the Bureau of Land Management to reconstruct the standing blockhouse at its current location, near where the historic Russian stockade stood that separated the colony of New Archangel from the adjacent Tlingit village between around 1806 and the 1860s. 

The original blockhouse was “D”-shaped, and constructed of hewn logs, in a very similar fashion to the current reconstruction.

For more information about the clean-up, call Chief of Resources Brinnen Carter on 907-747-0140.

[Submitted by Brinnen Carter]


National Capital Region
2014 National Capital Region Award Winners Announced

At a ceremony on December 4th, seven NCR employees received awards to recognize their outstanding work during 2014 in interpretation, leadership and natural resources.

Deputy Regional Director Lisa Mendelson-Ielmini presented the awards. NCR employees nominated for national level awards were also recognized.

National winner for the Exceptional IT Service Award: JP Schmidt, NCR Network Inventory and Monitoring program. JP led an effort to create two online visualization tools for examining national park streams and forests in the greater Washington region. The two visualizer sites are designed to help park managers understand and respond to stream water quality and forest vegetation. The sites offer frequently updated information about important changes and trends and allow for customized queries not available in printed reports. They give parks more lead time to react to sometimes complex ecological issues and will help park managers make decisions with a deeper scientific knowledge of park resources.

Superintendent of the Year for Natural Resource Stewardship: Vidal Martinez, Prince William Forest Park. Vidal supported the Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration Executive Order (E.O. 13508) by installing a rain garden at the Turkey Run Education Center and promoting educational materials to increase visitor awareness of the Chesapeake Bay as a critical watershed. He established Prince William Forest Park as the first park in the region to participate in the Climate Friendly Parks program.

Interpretive Leadership Award: John Noel, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park. John was recognized for his leadership in planning, developing and implementing the park’s curriculum-based education program and implementing the canal mobile tours program, which offers visitors a mobile interpretive experience.

Interpretive Media Award: Kelly Fox, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park. Kelly implemented a mobile tour program of the canal that provides interpretation at 57 stops, which highlight the canal’s diverse history. Through mobile devices, the program allows the park to reach more visitors than is possible through traditional interpretive programs.

Support to Interpretation Award – 21st Century Technology for 21st Century Interpretation: John Lampard, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park. As the park’s IT specialist, John collaborated with staff from the division of interpretation, education, and partnerships to identify the appropriate technology upgrades for each program, facilitate the purchasing and administrative elements of the process and provide outstanding customer service during implementation.

Sustained Interpretive Services Award: Rita Knox, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park. For 30 years “Ranger Rita,” as she is affectionately known, has been a fixture in the local community and the face of the park for thousands of visitors and school children. Rita has provided sustained and outstanding interpretive services including the only Rails & Trails program in the National Capital Region.

Interpretive Teamwork Award: Pianos in the Park, Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts. Inspired by other pianos in public spaces, the team from Wolf Trap worked to secure donations of working pianos, organize art projects to paint and decorate the pianos, and place the whimsical pianos in visible locations throughout the park. They were loved by visitors who enjoyed their visual and sound aesthetics, children who banged on them or belted out an imaginary song before hiking down to Theatre-in-the-Woods, and patrons who played them as they enjoyed a pre-performance picnic in the meadow.

Interpretive Special Event Award: Spring Awakening, Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts. The Spring Awakening was a festival-style public event held during Garden Week in collaboration with the Wolf Trap Foundation, Garden Club of Virginia, Friends of Wolf Trap, Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, Fairfax Audubon Society and Colvin Run Elementary School.

NCR Winner and National Nominee for the Freeman Tilden Award: Adam Gresek, Fort Washington Park, National Capital Parks- East. Adam used historical documents to create a play about the burning of Fort Warburton, the precursor to Fort Washington, during the War of 1812. Under his creative direction, the fort’s barracks became the courtroom, with magistrate and key historical figures present. The visiting audience acted as jury, while the interpreter provide commentary.

NCR Winner and National Nominee for the Harry Yount Award: Donald Stanley, Catoctin Mountain Park. In his 30-plus year career, Don has fought fires, given interpretative programs, mentored youth and volunteers and provided security to presidents and world leaders. He serves as a role model for all rangers by promoting the core values of resource stewardship, excellence in public service, integrity, spirit of tradition and respect for others.

NCR Nominee for the National John L. Cotter Award (Project Category): Katherine Birmingham, Monocacy National Battlefield. Katherine served as the field director on a multi-year archeology research project of Best Farm, part of the historic L’Hermitage plantation at Monocacy. Birmingham supervised and trained seven student employees and more than 50 volunteers, managed daily tasks for the project, conducted numerous tours, presentations and interviews on the project findings, and identified several critical historical records that resulted in the discovery of previously unknown research materials.

[Submitted by Jenny Anzelmo-Sarles, Media Relations/Spokesperson]


United States Park Police
Captain Zachary Moore To Retire

Captain Zachary Moore will retire from the United States Park Police on February 28th after 27 years of service.

Hired in December, 1987, Zachary served as a patrol officer in the San Francisco Field Office. He spent three years in the Horse Mounted Patrol (HMP) Unit, followed by promotion to a patrol sergeant position and shortly thereafter to sergeant in the HMP Unit.  

In 1998, he was promoted to administrative lieutenant in the San Francisco Field Office, where he served for two years before his promotion to captain. He became the regional law enforcement specialist for Intermountain Region in Santa Fe in 2000.

In 2004 Zachary changed assignments and served as the captain and regional law enforcement specialist for Pacific West Region, based in Seattle.

Captain Moore plans to remain in the Seattle area and spend time with his family.

[Submitted by Sergeant Lelani Woods, Public Information Officer]


Servicewide
Upcoming Training Calendar

All training offerings – webinars, online courses and training sessions in the field – appear in this listing only, updated each Friday. Entries must be received by midday Thursday at the latest for the following day’s update. Send them to Bill_Halainen@contractor.nps.gov.

All entries must be brief and should have the following:

  • Beginning and ending dates.
  • Name and location of course.
  • A short one- to two-line description.
  • The closing date for application or registration.
  • Name(s) and number(s) for more information.
  • Most importantly, a link to a website where full announcements or detailed information can be found.

New listings and revisions to this week’s calendar are in bold face. They are removed from the calendar once the application deadline has passed.

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Learning Event Catalog

The National Park Service now has an interim learning event catalog that will help you find some of those hard to locate learning events.  The catalog is a preview of one of many features yet to come on the new Common Learning Portal – an interactive, collaborative learning and development site scheduled to roll out in early FY16. The learning and development community has compiled a starting list of events offered regionally and Servicewide in FY15. This list is being updated on a biweekly basis as new opportunities arise and current events are updated, so check back regularly. To view the searchable PDF file click here: http://www.nps.gov/training/LD/docs/LD%20Calendar%20-%20FY-2015.pdf

Training and Webinars

February 28 – FMLP Mentors Program, application deadline. This year-long course requires attendance at three classroom sessions with instruction and practical application of supervision and leadership topics. The latest advances in facilities management will be reviewed, providing the mentors with sufficient knowledge to assist in their protégé’s development. Instruction in writing skills and techniques of mentoring will be included. The program is also designed to assist with an individual’s professional growth through the application of mentoring skills such as communication, lateral leadership, and critical analysis of written materials. Applicants should register for the FMLP Mentors Program-Supervision Practices in Facility Management on DOI Learn.  The course can be found at this link.  Once you have registered you will be sent an application by email.  Complete the application and return it to Mark Tezel by February 28th.  Mentors will be selected in March. For more information, contact either of the following: Sandy Pusey-Cameron, Asset Management Training Lead (202-997-7317, sandy_pusey@nps.gov ) or Mark Tezel, Asset Management Training Coordinator (202-431-7409, mark_tezel@nps.gov).

March 2 – March 5 – Parkmedic Refresher, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Gatlinburg, TN. This course is led by instructors from Roane State Community College and meets National Registry transition standards from Parkmedic/ I-85 to Advanced EMT.  This is a 36 hour transition course; cost is $100 and it is open to any National Park Service Parkmedic.  After completion, candidates are eligible to register for National Registry practical and cognitive testing in order to complete the transition to Advanced EMT.  For more information and/or to register, call KK Stuart at 828-497-1914 or email at kathleen_stuart@nps.gov.

March 3 – Background Investigations for NPS Fee Collection Personnel, webinar, 2 p.m. EST. The course will describe the background investigation requirements for both NPS fee collection personnel and non-federal staff (volunteers) who handle government monies, articulate the process of submitting background investigations, and explain the procedures the security office follows to determine whether a candidate is suitable for a fee collection position. For more information, click on this link. The registration deadline is March 1st.

March 5 – Stories of Slavery, WebEx training, 1:30-3:00 p.m. ET. In anticipation of the National Park Service’s centennial, four directorates – Workforce and Inclusion, Cultural Resources Partnerships and Science, Natural Resources, Science and Stewardship and Interpretation, Education and Volunteers – are sponsoring a webinar series designed to help employees learn more about the concepts of relevancy, diversity, and inclusion (RDI) and connect with others who are successfully implementing RDI into their work. Open this link for the full announcement in an IE browser.

March 9 – March 13 – Fundamentals Of Special Park Uses, NCTC, Shepherdstown, WV. The 36-hour course covers all aspects of special park uses from First Amendment to commercial filming and still photography to wireless telecommunication facilities. Also included is a component on temporary food services and other health and safety issues related to special park uses. DO-53/RM-53 is covered in depth, as well as 36 CFR and NPS Management Policies 2001. For more information contact Lee Dickinson, Special Park Uses Program Manager, WASO at 202-513-7092.

March 10 – March 12 – EMT Refresher, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Gatlinburg, TN. Also includes National Registry skills verification on March 13th. This course will meet National Registry requirements for a 24 hour EMT refresher and transition from EMT-Basic to EMT.  Instruction is provided by Roane State Community College.  Cost is $75.  An extra day for the skills review/verification is scheduled for Friday, March 13th.  Cost for this is $25. This refresher will be held at the Sugarlands Training room next to the Sugarlands Visitor Center.  For more information and/or to register, call KK Stuart at 828-497-1914 or email kathleen_stuart@nps.gov.

March 11 – March 12 – Skills for WebEx Moderators, 2:00 - 4:00 pm ET. In this training, you will learn how to support the instructor on the WebEx Training platform.  Learn to add supplemental class materials, set up polls and monitor learner activity.  Register in DOI Learn by March 1st.  Contact Jo_Robinson@nps.gov if more information is needed.

March 16 – March 20 – Motorboat Operator Instructor Certification Course, Everglades NP, FL. This course is targeted toward experienced motorboat operators and is designed to prepare persons who have previously completed the MOCC program to instruct others in the field of motorboat operations. The program will include principles of adult learning, instructional techniques and presentation; classroom management, use of MOCC lesson plans, and training aids; and the logistics of presenting a MOCC class at the local level. Students successfully completing this course will be certified to instruct the DOI "Motorboat Operator Certification Course" (MOCC). Tuition is $60. Closes on February 28th. For a nomination form or more information, contact Robert Gantt (robert_gantt@nps.gov, 305-242-7731).

March 18 – Getting Ready for Campaign Launch, Part II, webinar, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. Eastern. The Centennial Office is hosting webinars on ways in which employees and partners can learn about NPS preparations for the upcoming centennial. Conference line: 1-888-455-3079; verbal pass code: Service. Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/743189369 .

March 19 – NPS Digital Servicewide Call/Webinar, 1:00 - 2:00 pm ET. Keep informed about the latest happenings in the NPS digital world on these calls/webinars. They are intended for all NPS staff—web authors, supervisors who manage web resources, and anyone interested in NPS digital efforts. Unless otherwise noted, they are held on the third Thursdayof each month at 1 pm ET. The general format includes 40 minutes of material on a variety of digital topics across the NPS (e.g., web, social media, apps, etc.) followed by 20 minutes of questions and answers. Agendas, registration information, and recordings and supporting materials from past calls/webinars are posted on the Digital Community Site (https://sites.google.com/a/nps.gov/web-community/resources/servicewide-calls).

March 24, 26 and 27 – Retirement Planning for CSRS Employees, Livestream, 12:00-4:00 p.m. ET. This is a three-day, 13.5-hour class. All employees are encouraged to attend. Recording is restricted; viewing the live sessions is highly recommended as you will have the opportunity to ask questions. However, if you are not able to participate during the live broadcast times, a time-limited online video recording will be made available between March 30th and April 6th. We will email a confidential link to registered participants on March 30th. Click the link for more information. NPS contact is Katrina Fritts, 304.535.5089 or katrina_fritts@nps.gov.

March 25, 26 and 27 – Retirement Planning for FERS Employees, Livestream, 12:00-4:00 p.m. ET. This is a three-day, 13.5-hour class. All employees are encouraged to attend. Recording is restricted; viewing the live sessions is highly recommended as you will have the opportunity to ask questions. However, if you are not able to participate during the live broadcast times, a time-limited online video recording will be made available between March 30th and April 6th. We will email a confidential link to registered participants on March 30th. Click the link for more information. NPS contact is Katrina Fritts, 304.535.5089 or katrina_fritts@nps.gov.

March 24 – March 26Fiber Identification and Analysis for Conservation, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Houston, TX. This course covers basic polarized light microscopy (PLM) and methods of sampling, characterization and identification mammalian hair and selected natural and synthetic fibers. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on exercises involving sample preparation and specimen manipulation as well as the characterization and identification of real life specimens. For more information go to the event webpage at http://ncptt.nps.gov/events/fiber-identification-and-analysis-for-conservation/; or contact Jason Church: 318-356-7444 or jason_church@contractor.nps.gov.

March 24 – March 27 – Managing The Lost Person Incident, Redding, Ca. This course is designed to teach hands on and theoretical skills in search management in planning, operations and logistics functions.  The course will follow the four phases of a search: hasty, first operational, multiple operations, and the find/suspension periods. To prepare for the challenges faced on every search the students will learn through lectures, handouts, discussions, as well as getting their hands dirty in the paperwork through a multi-phase tabletop map exercises to hone their skills. This course is for rangers and EMS/SAR personnel who perform SAR operations. There is no fee for the course only a $60 materials fee. Please register by March 10th. For more information or to register contact Lassen Volcanic National Park's SAR coordinator, Jennifer Yeager-Fish (530-595-6151,  Jennifer_Yeager-Fish@nps.gov).

March 24 – April 4 – Structural Firefighter I/II Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1001 training standards to be qualified as a structural firefighter I and II. Participants will be able to perform both interior and exterior attacks during structural fire events. The course presents students with a strenuous hands-on curriculum that includes extensive training scenarios and live-fire drills. Students will be afforded numerous opportunities to develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed serve as a structural firefighter.  Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is March 1st. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

March 30 – April 3 –  Motorboat Operator Certification Course, Lake Mead NRA, NV. The course provides students with motorboat handling techniques and knowledge of safe operation utilizing the rules of the road, emergency operations/self -rescue, and night operation.   Course includes both practical (on the water) and lecture sessions.  The tuition is $900. For more information or an application form, contact Brandon_Marsmaker@nps.gov  by email or fax (702-293-8653) no later than by March 6th. Notification of selection of nominees will be sent out by email on after March 9th.

April 6 – April 10 – NPS Basic Technical Rescue Training – West, Island-In-The-Sky District, Canyonlands NP, Moab, UT. This training course is designed for personnel who routinely evacuate injured or stranded persons from heights and vertical terrain.  The course will provide participants with the skills to perform difficult technical rope-based rescues. Students will be required to bring personal technical rescue gear, including seat harness, climbing helmet, carabiners, rappel rack, ascenders, etc.  This is a very physically demanding course conducted outdoors with frequent exposure to severe heights and extreme environmental conditions.  All participants must be in good physical condition.  This training includes a night rescue training exercise.  Commercial lodging is available in Moab. Class size is limited and subject to funding, registration will be conducted on a first come first served basis, with priority to NPS employees who are actively involved with high angle rescue work. Target participants include permanent or seasonal employees who participate in a technical rescue program.  All participants must be covered in official duty status by their agency during the training, in the event of accident or injury. A $200 registration fee is required to cover training course administrative costs.  All participant travel and per diem expenses covered by benefiting account. The registration deadline is Friday, March 20th. For more information, contact Ken Phillips, NPS Branch Chief of Search and Rescue at 928-606-3862 (cell) or ken_phillips@nps.gov. Click on this link for a copy of the training form.

April 13 – April 16 – Mid-Century Modern Structures: Materials and Preservation 2015 Symposium, St. Louis, MO. The Friends of NCPTT, the World Monument Fund, the American Institute for Architects St. Louis, Washington University in St. Louis, and the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial are partnering for a jointly organized symposium on the preservation of Mid-Century Modern Structures. The meeting will be held at the Drury Plaza Hotel in St. Louis, Missouri, from April 14 to April16. A public lecture will precede the meeting on Monday evening, April 13, at Washington University in St. Louis. Focusing primarily on the history, use, and preservation of materials found in Mid-Century modern architecture. This three-day symposium will provide in-depth understanding of the complex issues associated with the preservation of these structures. For more information or to register please visit the training announcement (http://ncptt.nps.gov/events/mid-century-modern-structures-2/) or contact Mary Striegel at mary_striegel@nps.gov or 318-356-7444.

April 17 – Introduction to the Planning, Environment and Public Comment System (PEPC), Upper Mammoth, Yellowstone NP, WY. This instructor-led course will provide a hands-on introduction to the PEPC system. The course will cover menu navigation, project search/tracking, reporting capabilities, resource tools and customization for your park/unit. Students will create a project in PEPC, enter the funding status, set up an interdisciplinary team, fill out an Environmental Screening Form (ESF), set up a NEPA/NHPA pathway, create a document for internal review, create a public project page, post a public document, review public correspondence, and close a project. For more information, contact Shannon Kruse, shannon_kruse@nps.gov, (970) 267-2131. Register in DOI Learn by March 20th. Complete announcement available here.

April 20 – May 1 – Fire Apparatus Driver Operator Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1002 training standards to be qualified as fire apparatus driver operator. The class is designed to provide persons with the technical information and skills essential for the safe operation and proper maintenance of fire apparatus. Emphasis includes hands-on training of pumping and driving skills critical to support personnel assigned to all hazard response. Personnel will become proficient in troubleshooting, hydraulics, drafting and providing water through multiple pumping evolutions. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is March 22nd. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

April 27 – May 1 – NPS Basic Technical Rescue Training—East, Acadia NP, ME. This course is designed for persons tasked with extricating victims in high angle environments, such as cliffs, canyons, urban situations, and to some degree, caves.  All students should be in good physical condition, as there will be long days spent training outdoors, hiking with heavy loads, and often hanging on ropes for extended periods in very exposed settings. The course places a high premium on safety throughout the week, utilizing an ICS structure, applying Operational Leadership principles, and maintaining an instructor to student ratio of 1:3, and in some cases, 1:2. The instructor cadre has a wealth of experience and comes from a highly varied background, including veteran NPS rangers, maintenance workers, interpreters, resource management specialists and firefighters; military special operations personnel, such as Navy SEALs and Air Force PJs; certified climbing instructors and guides; a Maine State Parks ranger; veteran cavers; and tree surgeons. Optional after-hours presentations will be offered most evenings and will covers subjects such as a recent expedition to study the ice caves under Oregon’s Mt. Hood, cutting-edge lightweight mountaineering rescue techniques, and possible demonstrations from leaders in the climbing and cliff rescue industries. Loging will be in a dorm facility operated by a licensed Acadia NP concessioner.  There is zero tuition for attending the course, but there will be a small lodging fee of $5 per night per person for those who will be staying on site at the dorms.  Attendees will be able to cook meals on site, as well, at the dorm’s large group kitchen, and thus can eat affordably by utilizing the option of purchasing groceries for the week.  Student slots will be limited to 36, and will be on a first come-first served basis, with priority given to NPS employees and volunteers who are actively involved with high angle rescue work at their home parks.  Persons interested in attending this year’s course should contact the course incident commander, Middle Buffalo District Ranger Kevin Moses from Buffalo National River.  He can be reached at 870-688-0905 or kevin_moses@nps.gov, and he will send a training nomination form and associated information.  The cadre is hoping to fill the class by mid to late February, so apply early.

April 28 – April 29 – Landscape Preservation: An Introduction, Sitka National Historical Park, Sitka, AK. This training introduces students to the concept of cultural landscapes, including designed, vernacular, and ethnographic landscapes and historic sites.  Student then learn applicable laws and regulations, and discuss how to identify and inventory character-defining features of a landscape. Instructors then explore preservation planning and documentation, and how to develop a cultural landscape report to use in managing historic and cultural landscapes. Case studies illustrate realistic approaches to effective landscape management and preservation. Applications are due by April 14th. Details on the seminar can be found on the National Preservation Institute website (www.npi.org).  For more information, contact Brinnen Carter at 907-747-0140, or Brinnen_Carter@nps.gov.

April 28 – April 30 – Resource Advisor (READ) Training Course, Yosemite NP, CA. The class will provide participants with the foundation to serve as READs during wildland fire incidents. READs generally work with fire managers to convey concerns about natural, cultural, and wilderness resources. The course benefits from having a mix of agencies, state, tribal and other representatives, as well as all cultural and natural resource disciplines. There is no training cost. For further information, see the announcement at this link or contact Jun Kinoshita at jun_r_kinoshita@nps.gov.

April 30 – Landscape Preservation: Advanced Tools for Managing Change, Sitka National Historical Park, Sitka, AK. Students will explore issues that direct the process of change and decision-making for challenging landscapes. Instructors will then review the practices of inventorying, evaluating, treating, and maintaining landscape resources and discuss the implications of each, identifying tools and techniques for managing change when difficult issues affect the process. Students should come to understand the philosophical foundations for making sound, educated decisions about preserving and managing historic and cultural landscapes over the long-term. Applications are due by April 14th. Details on the seminar can be found on the National Preservation Institute website (www.npi.org).  For more information, contact Brinnen Carter at 907-747-0140, orBrinnen_Carter@nps.gov.

May 4 – May 8 – Archeological Resources Protection Training, Gettysburg NMP, Gettysburg, PA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is March 13th.

May 4, 2015 – April 15, 2016 – Facility Manager Leaders Program. This national award winning curriculum is designed to develop and strengthen selectees’ knowledge and competencies in asset management, operations and maintenance, project management, resource stewardship, business management, supervision and leadership. This is a competency based training opportunity; it is not an intake program.  Selected candidates will be enrolled in an intensive year-long program involving 20 to 28 weeks of study, classes and activities. To apply, log onto DOI Learn and enter “Facility Manager Leaders Program” in the search field. IMPORTANT: All six parts of the on-line application must be completed no later than January 16th. For additional information, contact Mark Tezel at (202) 431-7409.

June 23 – June 26 – Asset Management 101, Shenandoah NP, VA. This workshop will give attendees the opportunity to become more familiar with the application of asset management ideas, an opportunity to share ideas, work through project challenges, gain networking skills, and enhance individual professional development needed to move the Commercial Services Program into the future. Please register at DOI Learn by May 26th. The contacts for the course are Mark Colburn, 202-513-7198 or Kate Volzer, 202-513-7035. For more information, go to http://cs.inside.nps.gov/cs/Sites/servicewide/learning/amt/default.aspx.

June 25 – June 26 – Taser Instructor Certification/Recertification, Acadia NP, ME. A new certification and recertification instructor course for taser instructors will be held in the park in June. Log on to http://www.taser.com/training/training-events  and click on "search 2015 Classes"  and follow the instructions. For more information, contact Chris Wiebusch at 207-288-8776 or chris_wiebusch@nps.gov.

August 3 – August 7 – Fundamentals Of Special Park Uses, Albuquerque, NM. The 36-hour course covers all aspects of special park uses from First Amendment to commercial filming and still photography to wireless telecommunication facilities. Also included is a component on temporary food services and other health and safety issues related to special park uses. DO-53/RM-53 is covered in depth, as well as 36 CFR and NPS Management Policies 2001. For more information contact Lee Dickinson, Special Park Uses Program Manager, WASO at 202-513-7092.

August 18 – August 20 – Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Training, Big South Fork NRA, TN.  This 24 hour course prepares an individual to become a peer supporter on the National Park Service’s National CISM team.  CISM training is designed to prepare employees to function as a peer supporter assisting fellow staff members in dealing with the aftermath of a critical incident or traumatic event and being able to provide support and service to families.  At the completion of this training the participants will understand a wide range of crisis intervention services including pre and post incident crisis education, significant other support services, on-scene support services, crisis intervention for individuals, demobilization after large scale traumatic incidents, small group defusing, critical incident stress debriefings, one-on-one intervention strategies, and family liaison services on both internal and external incidents.  Please contact Randy Scoggins (randy_scoggins@nps.gov) for questions or to apply. Application deadline is July 13th.  Space is limited.

September 9 – September 11 – Structural Firefighter Biannual Refresher, Glacier National Park, MT. This three-day class satisfies the refresher requirements for NPS Structural Firefighters as outlined in Chapter 10 of Reference Manual 58, NPS Structural Fire Management. The course is designed to refresh the skills, knowledge and competencies of previously certified structural firefighting personnel through the utilization of live fire scenarios. NPS live fire qualified instructors direct the training in compliance with NFPA 1403 and OSHA requirements. Application deadline is August 9th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

September 14 – October 16 – National Search & Rescue Academy (NSARA): Fall 2015 Session, Camp Navajo, located near Flagstaff, AZ.  NSARA is an intensive five-week comprehensive SAR training program for federal employees. This program will provide participants with a venue to efficiently attain basic field rescuer skills in a single condensed format, which typically requires several years of career development. This core program provides participants with essential field rescue skills in ground search operations, incident command system, swiftwater rescue, technical rope rescue, search management, basic aviation safety, helicopter rescue techniques, and remote/austere EMS techniques. This is a very physically demanding course and participants are required to perform at an arduous level without physical, mental, or emotional limitations. Participants will be involved in physical fitness training, which is completed through the Marine Corps physical fitness test. Participants are required to achieve a “First Class PFT Score” by the end of the academy. In addition to completion of independent study classes on basic ICS and SAR, candidates must possess a current minimum certification at the First Responder or Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) level. For further information on this training, see the announcement and nomination form at this link. Submit completed nomination forms to NSARA Coordinator Ken Phillips, NPS Branch Chief of Search & Rescue.  E-mail: ken_phillips@nps.gov.  Phone: (928) 606-3862 (cell). The nomination deadline is August 14th.

October 12 – October 23 – Structural Firefighter I/II Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1001 training standards to be qualified as a structural firefighter I and II. Participants will be able to perform both interior and exterior attacks during structural fire events. The course presents students with a strenuous hands-on curriculum that includes extensive training scenarios and live-fire drills. Students will be afforded numerous opportunities to develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed serve as a structural firefighter.  Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is August 23rd. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.    

November 2 – November 7 – Fire Officer and Instructor Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, (location to be determined). This class includes certification in both fire instructor I and fire officer I. These classes have been combined as fire instructor is a required prerequisite for fire officer. The class is a combination of online activities with job performance skills being demonstrated in a class or field setting. Fire instructor is designed around classroom lectures, group activities, and individual presentations. Topics include learning theories, use of instructional materials and media, maintaining student records and techniques for effective communication. The fire officer portion of the class focuses on technical knowledge and leadership skills which are essential for command and control of engine company personnel during fire emergencies. Participants will be introduced to the skills of preplanning, fire attack strategies/tactics and logistical support functions. Skills are reinforced and evaluated through dynamic group sessions and video simulations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is October 4th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

Online Training

Web Authoring

NPS Basic Web. The basic course covers the topics that web authors need to effectively communicate via NPS websites—both internal and external. The basic course introduces students to web terminology, content strategy, accessibility, writing for the web, image selection/editing, PDF usage, web analytics, web support, and content management system (CMS) basics. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF2013.

NPS Intermediate Web. The intermediate course builds on topics covered in the basic course (above) to give park or program web coordinators (or any interested web author) resources for managing content on NPS websites. The intermediate course goes into more depth about content strategy, web analytics, accessibility, shared content on NPS.gov, and content management system (CMS) elements. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF4017

Natural Resources

Introduction to the Career Academy for Natural Resources. This two-hour on-line training orients learners to the natural resource and science career path within the National Park Service. It explains the role of the natural resource professional within the NPS, and introduces the concepts of ethical conduct, scientific integrity, interdisciplinary networks and building and maintaining professional credibility. Students will address their career development by exploring ways to design and implement professional development plans. Introduction to the Career Academy for Natural Resources is the first unit in the course of study being developed for the Foundational Natural Resource series of the Career Academy for Natural Resources. The Foundational Series is designed to help employees achieve the natural resource competencies at the entry/developmental level. It may also benefit natural resource professionals at any level who are new to the National Park Service. This course is available through DOI Learn. The course code is NPS-NRS1501. Cost: Free. To learn more about the Career Academy for Natural Resources, visit the website at http://www.nps.gov/training/nrs/academy/academy.html. For more information, please contact Jeri Hall, jeri_hall@nps.gov.

Introduction to Air Resources. Every unit in the national park system has air resources, but, because air is invisible and easily crosses park boundaries, many people do not think of it as a resource that the park service manages. This two-hour on-line training provides employees from any division with a basic understanding of what air resources are, why they are important, and the laws, regulations and policies that guide and govern their management. The course will also introduce the science of air pollution, air quality monitoring, and some of the air-related issues faced by parks throughout the service, including several in-depth case studies. It will provide learners with resources to explore air quality and management issues at their own unit, and sources for more in-depth information and assistance in dealing with specific problems. The course is part of the Career Academy for Natural Resources, and is the first of a planned series of on-line learning opportunities designed to provide NPS employees with an introduction to specific natural resources and natural resource issues. These courses are intended for natural resource employees at the entry/developmental level, and for anyone who wishes to learn more about natural resources within the national park system. This course is available through DOI Learn. The course code is NPS-NRS1503. Cost: Free. To learn more about the Career Academy for Natural Resources, visit the website at this link. For more information, please contact Jeri Hall, jeri_hall@nps.gov.

Cultural Resources

Nationwide Programmatic Agreement Toolkit. To help guide NPS staff on implementing the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement, which governs Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the NPS has developed a “toolkit.” The toolkit is mandatory training that provides guidance to NPS superintendents and Section 106 coordinators, division chiefs, and facilities staff at region and park levels on using the programmatic agreement during Section 106 review. NPS employees may earn a certificate for their review of the toolkit through DOI Learn by taking a final assessment. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the toolkit website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The toolkit website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/history/howto/PAToolkit/index.htm. For more information about the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement toolkit, please contact: Jeffrey Durbin, NPS Section 106 compliance program officer, at 202-354-1816 or Jeffrey_durbin@nps.gov

Managing Archeological Collections. Learn about caring for archeological collections and help to overcome the curation crisis. The course is designed to assist those who are interested in, or need to learn more about, preserving and managing archeological collections over the long term. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/collections/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Archeology for Interpreters. Through this training, interpreters and anyone with an interest and need to know – including law enforcement rangers, natural resource experts, and managers -- may gain basic knowledge about archeology. The course provides opportunities to learn about archeological methods and analysis and how to encourage concern for the preservation and protection of archeological resources. A park-based case study provides practice. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/AforI/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Interpretation for Archeologists. Archeologists and other resource professionals can take this training to gain a firm foundation in and understanding of the purpose, philosophy, and techniques of interpretation. The course encourages archeologists to frame their work for the public and to work with interpreters to integrate archeological perspectives into interpretive products and tell compelling stories.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/IforA/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Study Tour of Archeological Interpretation. View interpretation with “fresh eyes” to evaluate choices and strategies for interpreting archeology in parks and historic sites. Download worksheets to assist in evaluating both onsite interpretation and virtual visits.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/studytour/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Assessment of Archeological Interpretation. Use the interpretive analysis model to evaluate the effectiveness of interpreting archeological resources on the basis of visitor experience at the levels of short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and audience feedback. Learn more about the National Park Service evaluation strategy. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/aiassess/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Wilderness

The Wilderness Act of 1964. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Writing a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Evaluating a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Deciding to Keep Wilderness Wild: Four Cornerstones for Wilderness Managers. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Stewardship Planning Framework. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Visitor Use Management. A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Strategies, and Monitoring Impacts and Uses.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Natural Resource Management in Wilderness. A suite of twelve courses: Fundamentals, Challenges in Natural Resource Restoration, Monitoring, Evaluating Proposals for Scientific Activity, Fish and Wildlife, Fish and Wildlife Inventory and Monitoring, Threatened and Endangered Species, Air Quality, Soil and Water, Vegetation, Soundscapes, and Night Sky.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Cultural Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this linkfor course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Paleontological Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Retirement

Firefighter/Law Enforcement Officer Retirement Training for Human Resource Specialists, Managers and Supervisors. This course is designed to provide firefighter and law enforcement officer retirement training for human resources specialists, managers and supervisors. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

FERS Retirement Training for Firefighters and Law Enforcement Officers. This course is designed to provide firefighters and law enforcement officers with information on FERS special retirement provisions so that they can manage their careers in such a way that they maximize their benefits. Special retirement provisions apply to employees occupying these positions and they have specific responsibilities that are critical to know about and act upon throughout their careers if they expect to qualify for special retirement. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

Supervision

New Supervisor Development Program. This new training and development program, which was begun last year, is designed specifically for first-time supervisors within the 12 month probationary period of their initial appointment. The New Supervisor Development Program (NSDP) is a blended learning program that is delivered both online and in residential (three day) sessions across the country in collaboration with Bureau of Land Management, and the Fish and Wildlife Service. The online modules (completely free of cost) are available on DOILearn as preliminary work, and include the basics of in knowledge and skills for a first-time supervisor. Completion of these modules is followed by a three day Supervisory Skills Workshop (SSW) that provides synthesis and skills practice. The NSDP satisfies the initial 40-hour new supervisory training required by OPM (5CFR 412.202). There will be no cost to parks and regions in FY 2014 – all costs (tuition and travel) are being funded by WASO Learning and Development. Registrations for the SSW are managed via regional employee development officers by slot allocation.  For more information, please contact Katrina Roberts, NSDP Training Manager, 202-354-1471, or Katherine Callaway, 202-354-1403, or your regional employee development officer.  Additional information can be found at: http://www.nps.gov/training/ - click on Leadership Development Programs.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES



John Day Fossil Beds National Monument (OR)
GS-0341-9/11 Administrative Officer (Detail)

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument is seeking candidates for a detail or temporary promotion as the park’s acting administrative officer.

This opportunity is open to individuals in the National Park Service at the GS-7 level and above who wish to be considered for a temporary detail at the GS-9/11 level or a temporary promotion to the GS-9/11 level.

This is a temporary developmental assignment, not to exceed 120 days and beginning in late April. You will return to your regular duties at the end of the assignment. During the detail assignment, the permanent vacancy is expected to be advertised and filled with an estimated EOD concurrent with the end of the detail opportunity.

The acting administrative officer is responsible for:

  • Supervising one permanent GS-5 and up to two seasonal employees
  • Working with the Superintendent to program and track the Monument’s FY15 base budget of approximately $1.6 million and various other accounts (housing, projects, etc), using both AFS4 and FBMS.  Applicants should have the following FBMS roles: P_ACQ_AO_F, P_ACQ_CFA_F, P_ACQ_COR_F, P_AP_MO_F, P_AR_BC_F, P_BW_FPPSR_F, P_CCAOPC_F, P_CC_BFR_F, P_CF_LB_PPPW_ALL, P_CF_PP_ALL, P_EM_LB_PPPW_ALL, P_EM_PP_ALL, P_FM_FA_F, P_FM_FA1_F, P_GL_FAP_F, P_GL_FOA_F, P_LB_BLCS_F  or be able to obtain these roles before the detail begins.
  • Assisting program managers with personnel processes for approximately 20 FTEs.
  • Processing government funds from donation boxes, special park use fees, etc.  Applicants must have a Moderate Risk Background Investigation level (MBI) to be considered.
  • Managing housing program for three NPS houses. 
  • Serving on the park’s management team

During this assignment, salary will be paid by John Day Fossil Beds National Monument.  Applicable travel and per diem will be paid by John Day Fossil Beds (with reduced per diem consistent with NPS travel policies).

If you are interested in this developmental assignment, you must discuss this opportunity with your first-line supervisor and obtain concurrence from your manager prior to applying. Once approval is gained, you should submit a resume, no more than two pages, detailing your work history, educational background, and any special qualifications (please specify your level of background clearance and what FBMS roles you hold) and an SF-50 reflecting your tenure and current grade level

Submit your application materials electronically to nwshro_staffing@nps.gov no later than March 6th. Please include “JODA Acting Administrative Officer” in the subject line of the message.

Please contact Shelley Hall, Superintendent, John Day Fossil Beds National Monument at: shelley_hall@nps.gov (541-987-2333, ext 1212) for any additional questions you may have about this developmental opportunity.