The Morning Report

Friday, December 05, 2014

Recent Editions  

INCIDENTS



Editor’s Desk
No Reports Today

No new incident reports have been received.

NEWS AND NOTES



Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site (CO)
Ceremonies Mark 150th Of Sand Creek Massacre

Native American descendants of the victims of one of the darkest chapters in U.S. history gathered with supporters and other park visitors last Saturday and Sunday to recognize those brutally killed 150 years ago at the Sand Creek Massacre.

The weekend activities drew more than 1,000 people, about half of whom were members of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes of Montana, Wyoming and Oklahoma. The historic site, dedicated in 2007 and administered by NPS, preserves the place where their ancestors were brutally attacked by U.S. troops on November 29, 1864.

The weekend observance at the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in southeastern Colorado,  included tribal ceremonies, history programs by the National Park Service, screenings of two new documentary films, and the start of a four-day, 180-mile journey of spiritual healing from the massacre site to Denver.

“The event exceeded our expectations,” said Alexa Roberts, NPS superintendent of the site. “This year marks a real watershed for Sand Creek. It is a turning point for public awareness and for a more forward-looking dialogue about the massacre and its meaning.”

Native participants in the memorial events came from the Northern Cheyenne Tribe (Montana), the Northern Arapaho Tribe (Wyoming) and the Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes (Oklahoma) and included tribal representatives, elders and chiefs.

Other attendees and speakers included U.S. Representative and Senator-elect Cory Gardner of Colorado, Colorado State Senator Ellen Roberts, Bishop Elaine Stanovsky of the Rocky Mountain and Yellowstone Annual Conferences of the United Methodist Church, David Halaas former Colorado state historian and Byron Strom, descendant of Captain Silas Soule, a military officer who refused to participate in the massacre. 

The church has conducted an ongoing process of public atonement and reconciliation because the massacre’s two key instigators were prominent Methodists.

On Friday, tribal members erected tepees on the park’s Monument Hill and near a grove of cottonwoods at the site’s administrative complex. On Saturday morning, they conducted private ceremonies on the windy bluff above Sand Creek while other visitors attended NPS history presentations at the park picnic grounds about the massacre and its key figures.

At the conclusion of the tribes’ observance, dignitaries spoke at a public ceremony. Speakers included Northern Cheyenne Tribe President Levando Fisher, Chief Reginald Kills Night, Chief Phillip Whiteman Jr., Robert Little Wolf, Roger Kills Night and Northern Cheyenne Tribal Administrator William Walks Along. Southern Cheyenne speakers included Alan Fletcher, a chief and legislator, and Karen Little Coyote, the tribe’s Sand Creek Committee representative.

Early on Sunday, participants in the healing run braved bitterly cold winds on Monument Hill for a ceremonial sendoff led by Otto Braided Hair of the Northern Cheyenne,  Joe Big Medicine, and Eugene Blackbear Jr., of the Southern Cheyenne and Gail Ridgely of the Northern Arapaho Tribe.

Also on Sunday morning, Nelson White, Crawford White and Richard Antelope of the Northern Arapaho Tribe offered an additional blessing to runners and the public.  The 16th annual Sand Creek Massacre Spiritual Healing Run, led by Cheyenne and Arapaho tribal members and dedicated to Steven Brady Sr., concludes on Wednesday in Denver on the steps of the Colorado State Capitol.

[Submitted by Patrick O'Driscol and James Doyle]


Division of Regulations, Jurisdiction and Special Park Uses
Passing Of Regulations Specialist Rose Wilkinson

Carrie Rose Wilkinson passed away unexpectedly on the weekend of November 22nd following a short illness.  She is survived by her parents and her daughter Hannah.

For the past three years, Rose served as a regulations program specialist with the Division of Regulations, Jurisdiction and Special Park Uses.  Along with other NPS accomplishments, Rose had recently written and published a proposed revision to the Servicewide pet regulations to better address the use of service animals by park visitors.  

Rose began her NPS career as a STEP hire, and in May, 2014, after completing her juris doctorate degree at George Washington University Law School, converted to permanent full-time  through the Pathways program.  At GWU Law, Rose served as the article editor for The Journal of Energy and Environmental Law.  Rose was recently notified that she had passed the Maryland bar exam.

Rose also held a master of science in biological anthropology (3.95 GPA) from the University of New Mexico and had completed all of the academic course work there for a Ph.D. in that subject.  She graduated summa cum laude from West Texas A&M University with a bachelor of science in biology with a wildlife management focus.

Before joining the NPS, Rose served as an instructor of anthropology and an adjunct professor of biology at several universities and served as the managing zoologist/primatologist at the St. Catherines Island Foundation Wildlife Survival Center on St. Catherines Island in Georgia.    

Rose played and coached competitive volleyball.  She was originally from Amarillo, Texas, and – something that may be related – owned a Ford F250 pickup truck and drove a 375 hp Dodge Challenger HEMI V8. 

She had a great legal and organizational mind and was a very accomplished writer.  She was a joy to have on the team and will be deeply missed by her coworkers. 

[Submitted by Russel J. Wilson, Division Chief]


Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot National Monuments - AZ
Native American Heritage Month Commemoration Held

Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot National Monuments celebrated National Native American Heritage Month with nine special events and more than a dozen demonstrators representing American Indian tribes of Arizona and New Mexico.

On the first two days of November, the monuments partnered with Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site and Western National Parks Association in a Native American crafts show that highlighted central Arizona’s role as an intercultural crossroad during prehistoric times.

The following weekend, Navajo flute player Aaron White gave talks on the history of Native American flute music at Montezuma Castle. The Yavapai Bird Dancers and Gourd Singers performed at Tuzigoot and shared challenges faced by their culture as they pass vanishing traditions and languages to future generations.

On November 15th, Hopi artist Ryan Gashweseoma spent the day in front of the Castle demonstrating traditional methods of carving and painting kachina dolls. He shared the role of the kachinas in Hopi culture and talked about his materials and how he makes paints from natural pigments found on the Hopi Mesas and the Navajo Nation.

November 22nd marked Montezuma Castle’s Fall FiberFest, a historic gathering of six traditional weavers from the Hopi Tribe, the Pueblo of Zuni, and the Piro-Manso-Tiwa Tribe. Throughout the day, artisans Blayne Honanie, Adkin Kuwanyaioma, Nuvakuku Dawavendewa, Louie García, Chris Lewis, and Marvin Pooyouma gave talks and demonstrated various aspects of spinning, dyeing, and weaving cotton and wool yarn.

The artists have been honored with awards and recognition from the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff; the Tuhisma Arts and Crafts Show in Kykotsmovi, Arizona; the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico; and the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

On November 29th, the two monuments finished Native American Heritage Month with events at each site. At Montezuma Castle, Western (Dil’zhe’e) Apache silversmith Jerry Whagado showed the process of making silver overlay jewelry. A local artisan, Whagado grew up on the Hopi Mesas, where he learned silver-smithing before integrating it with Apache imagery.

The month’s activities culminated Saturday evening at Tuzigoot, with a sunset flute concert from Native American performer and educator Wolfs Robe.

More than 5,500 visitors attended the monuments on the days of the events and were able to observe the various demonstrations. Special talks were attended by almost 600 visitors.

[Submitted by Case Griffing, Park Ranger]


Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (AZ,UT)
Sixth Annual McGinn-Axelsen Scholarship Presented

On November 21st, the sixth Brent McGinn and Laurie Axelsen Scholarship was presented to Jeffrey Leininger for being the “Best in Class” at the Northern Arizona University Seasonal Law Enforcement Training Program.

On behalf of the families and friends of Brent McGinn and Laurie Axelsen, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Ranger Jamey Brazell presented Leininger with a $1,000 check, a commemorative plaque, and a memorial coin.

Brent McGinn and Laurie Axelsen died in an off-duty aircraft accident in October of 2010.  The McGinn and Axelsen Scholarship was created to honor them and to financially assist future rangers who graduate from seasonal law enforcement training programs with all-around top honors. 

Leininger embodied the characteristics of excellence, integrity, hard work, and pride in performance as exemplified by Chief Ranger McGinn and District Ranger Axelsen.

[Submitted by Cynthia Sequanna]


Servicewide
Upcoming Training Calendar

All training offerings – webinars, online courses and training sessions in the field – appear in this listing only, updated each Friday. Entries must be received by midday Thursday at the latest for the following day’s update. Send them to Bill_Halainen@contractor.nps.gov.

All entries must be brief and should have the following:

  • Beginning and ending dates.
  • Name and location of course.
  • A short one- to two-line description.
  • The closing date for application or registration.
  • Name(s) and number(s) for more information.
  • Most importantly, a link to a website where full announcements or detailed information can be found.

New listings and revisions to this week’s calendar are in bold face. They are removed from the calendar once the application deadline has passed.

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Learning Event Catalog

The National Park Service now has an interim learning event catalog that will help you find some of those hard to locate learning events.  The catalog is a preview of one of many features yet to come on the new Common Learning Portal – an interactive, collaborative learning and development site scheduled to roll out in early FY16. The learning and development community has compiled a starting list of events offered regionally and Servicewide in FY15. This list is being updated on a biweekly basis as new opportunities arise and current events are updated, so check back regularly. To view the searchable PDF file click here: http://www.nps.gov/training/LD/docs/LD%20Calendar%20-%20FY-2015.pdf

Training and Webinars

December 9 – December 11 Introduction to WebEx Training,  2:00 - 4:00 pm ET. Planning on delivering training via WebEx?  Learn how to use the tools of WebEx Training to engage your learners and avoid death by PowerPoint.  Register in DOI Learn by December 1st. Contact Jo_Robinson@nps.gov if more information is needed.

December 4 – Interactive Webinars: How to Engage Your Audience, 2:00 – 3:15 p.m. ET. This is an Adobe Connect session. Learn how to engage your audience through effective virtual design and delivery, with emphasis on keeping attention & interest. Check out the full description and course objectives at this site in DOI Learn.

December 8 – December 12 – Fire Officer and Instructor Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class includes certification in both Fire Instructor I and Fire Officer I. These classes have been combined as fire instructor is a required prerequisite for fire officer. The combined class is a combination of online activities with job performance skills being demonstrated in a class or field setting. Fire instructor is designed around classroom lectures, group activities, and individual presentations. Topics include learning theories, use of instructional materials and media, maintaining student records and techniques for effective communication. The fire officer portion of the class focuses on technical knowledge and leadership skills which are essential for command and control of engine company personnel during fire emergencies. Participants will be introduced to the skills of preplanning, fire attack strategies/tactics and logistical support functions. Skills are reinforced and evaluated through dynamic group sessions and video simulations. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules and class assessments. Access to the on-line class is available on December 9th. Application deadline is November 10th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

December 9 – December 12 – Access to Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, VA. This course is ideal for planners, designers, facility managers and accessibility coordinators.  Learners will apply the accessibility standards to new construction and altered recreation facilities (campgrounds, picnic sites, docks, etc); direct project supervision to ensure compliance with the accessibility standards; and apply universal design concepts to benefit the widest spectrum of park users. 

December 9 – December 12 – Wildlife Field Anesthesia Training, Point Reyes National Seashore, CA.  Designed for NPS personnel, the class offers instruction on field anesthesia of wildlife.  Topics include regulations on the use of pharmaceuticals in wildlife, physiological effects of drugs, dose calculations, darting equipment, animal and human safety, euthanasia, and establishing a wildlife capture and anesthesia program.  The class will consist of two and a half classroom days, a half day using darting equipment on a shooting range, and a half day participating in a field exercise.  It will start on Tuesday morning and end on Friday at noon. There is no tuition charge, but students are responsible for their own travel and per diem costs. The class size is limited. To register for this class or to find out more, call or email Ryan Monello at 970-568-2492 or Ryan_Monello@nps.gov. The deadline for registration is November 24th.

December 11 – Sustainable Practices Report Training, webinar, 2 – 3:30 p.m. EST. The Park Facility Management Division, Sustainable Operations and Climate Change Branch, will host a series of training webinars on the FY14 sustainable practices report. This training is for NPS personnel who are designated to complete this report, especially those from parks that have never submitted a report. The webinar will cover the background on reporting, DOI’s web-based SPR system, preparing for the report, and reporting requirement highlights.  If you have any questions about this training, contact David Kahl at the NPS Solid Waste Management Help Desk (http://inside.nps.gov/waso/custommenu.cfm?lv=3&prg=999&id=10417) via email (David_Kahl@contractor.nps.gov), alternate email (david@dakahlconsulting.com), or phone (970-416-6542). Click on this link to register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6501234496183939329.

December 29 – December 30 – Skills for WebEx Moderators, 2:00 - 4:00 pm ET. In this training, you will learn how to support the instructor on the WebEx Training platform.  Learn to add supplemental class materials, set up polls and monitor learner activity.  Register in DOI Learn by December 20th.  Contact Jo_Robinson@nps.gov if more information is needed. 

January 5 – January 16 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Instructor Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is November 18th.

January 5 – January 16 – Use of Force Instructor Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is November 18th.

January 11 – February 7 – NPS Parkmedic Training Program, Community Regional Medical Center, Fresno, CA. This certification course is designed to take the already proficient EMT/EMT-Basic or EMT-Intermediate 85 or AEMT and increase his/her skills and knowledge to function as an ALS Parkmedic provider in remote and wilderness areas within the national parks. The course will be taught in three sections: classroom (didactic), clinical (hospital), and field internship (pre-hospital). Open to NPS employees who are currently certified as state or national EMT- Basic,  EMT – Intermediate or AEMT, and who are expected to provide advanced life support services within the NPS.  Currently certified AEMT’s who complete this course to transition to the Parkmedic level may opt out of the NREMT certification exam. Clinical and field internship hours will be scheduled individually immediately following this training block. You should expect to stay in Fresno for a minimum of two weeks following the didactic portion of the class to complete the required 50% of your clinical and field experience, which must be done in Fresno.  The remaining 50% may be done in Fresno per your request, but then you should allow an additional one to two weeks, for a total of three to four weeks in Fresno after February 7th.  Alternatively, this final 50% may be done at the ranger's home park/hospital. The tuition is $2,000 if paid before December 8, 2014; $2,300 if paid after December 8, 2014. There is a $300 non-refundable deposit.  Course fee will include a voucher to take the AEMT exam. Nominees must complete and submit a Standard Form 182 (10 Part) to their Training Office. Payment information can be obtained by calling Donna Armijo, UCSF Building at (559) 499-6439.  Application and non-refundable deposit must be received no later than December 8th. For more information, contact Dean Ross, Branch Chief, Emergency Services, (Dean_Ross@nps.gov; 202-513-7093) or Dr. Thomas Kim (tkim@fresno.ucsf.edu), Dr. Christina Umber (cumber@fresno.ucsf.edu), or Donna Armijo (parkmedicprogram@fresno.ucsf.edu, 559-499-6439) in Fresno.

January 13 – Sustainable Practices Report Training, webinar, 2 – 3:30 p.m. EST. The Park Facility Management Division, Sustainable Operations and Climate Change Branch, will host a series of training webinars on the FY14 sustainable practices report. This training is for NPS personnel who are designated to complete this report, especially those from parks that have never submitted a report. The webinar will cover the background on reporting, DOI’s web-based SPR system, preparing for the report, and reporting requirement highlights.  If you have any questions about this training, contact David Kahl at the NPS Solid Waste Management Help Desk (http://inside.nps.gov/waso/custommenu.cfm?lv=3&prg=999&id=10417) via email (David_Kahl@contractor.nps.gov), alternate email (david@dakahlconsulting.com), or phone (970-416-6542). Click on this link to register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7522456498015855105 .

January 21 – January 22 – Skills for WebEx Moderators, 2:00 - 4:00 pm ET. In this training, you will learn how to support the instructor on the WebEx Training platform.  Learn to add supplemental class materials, set up polls and monitor learner activity.  Register in DOI Learn by January 11th.  Contact Jo_Robinson@nps.gov if more information is needed. 

January 27 – January 29 - Introduction to WebEx Training,  2:00 - 4:00 pm ET. Planning on delivering training via WebEx?  Learn how to use the tools of WebEx Training to engage your learners and avoid death by PowerPoint.  Register in DOI Learn by January 15th. Contact Jo_Robinson@nps.gov if more information is needed.

February (dates TBD) – Improving NPS Team Capacity to Analyze and Transform Stakeholder Conflict in Park Management, interactive online webinars. The final dates will be chosen by a selected team. The NPS is often involved in conflicts between people about natural resources, wildlife and park management actions. The Human-Wildlife Conflict Collaboration (HWCC) and NPS Biological Resource Management Division are providing an opportunity for one park team to participate in a new series of facilitated interactive webinars to learn to apply the fundamentals of conservation conflict transformation (CCT) and receive consultation on how to transform an ongoing conflict. This interactive online series will provide participants with an orientation to the analytical skills needed to recognize and address the underlying drivers of conflict, exposure to several fundamental principles and processes for transforming complex social conflicts, and development of preliminary strategic “next steps” for creating positive change for their park and surrounding community around a specific conflict. At the end of the course, participants will have developed a plan to improve engagement with stakeholders for their chosen case. This significantly reduced-fee online capacity building and strategic guidance series is available through a competitive process to one park-based team that must be composed of a diversity of staff, including those working at senior, mid-level and field-based levels and must represent an appropriate range of divisions (e.g., natural resource management, interpretation, law enforcement, facilities). The team will address a conflict or challenging decision-making effort of their choosing. The entire team must commit to the pre-workshop work, the two structured sessions and to the work done by their team between sessions. Park teams that do not have diverse representation will not be eligible. Tuition cost is $250 per team member. Applications must be submitted by January 16th. For the full announcement and application, go to http://www.nps.gov/training/nrs/events/events.html. For more information about the course, please contact Kirsten Leong, kirsten_leong@nps.gov, 970-267-2191.

February 2 – February 13 – Use Of Force Instructor Training, Colorado Northwestern Community College, Rangeley, CO.  Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is January 2nd.

February 9 – February 13 – Command And General Staff Functions For Local Incident Management Teams, NCTC, Shepherdstown, WV. Applicants must have completed ICS 100, 200, 700 and 800. Registration is due by January 9th. For more information, contact Elaine Bond, DOI Office of Emergency Management, 202-208-5417, Elaine_Bond@ios.doi.gov.

February 10 – February 12 – Introduction to WebEx Training,  2:00 - 4:00 pm ET. Planning on delivering training via WebEx?  Learn how to use the tools of WebEx Training to engage your learners and avoid death by PowerPoint.  This session is reserved for Business Services employees. Register in DOI Learn by January 31st. Contact Jo_Robinson@nps.gov if more information is needed.

February 10 – February 13 – Access to Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, NV. This course is ideal for planners, designers, facility managers and accessibility coordinators.  Learners will apply the accessibility standards to new construction and altered recreation facilities (campgrounds, picnic sites, docks, etc); direct project supervision to ensure compliance with the accessibility standards; and apply universal design concepts to benefit the widest spectrum of park users. 

February 18 – Centennial Schedule & Event Planning, webinar, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. Eastern. The Centennial Office is hosting webinars on ways in which employees and partners can learn about NPS preparations for the upcoming centennial. Conference line: 1-888-455-3079; verbal pass code: Planning. Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/119141904 .

February 18 – February 19 – Skills for WebEx Moderators, 2:00 - 4:00 pm ET. In this training, you will learn how to support the instructor on the WebEx Training platform.  Learn to add supplemental class materials, set up polls and monitor learner activity.  This session is reserved for Business Services employees. Register in DOI Learn by February 8th. Contact Jo_Robinson@nps.gov if more information is needed. 

February 23 – February 25 – NREMT Refresher: (Tactical EMS), Independence NHP, Philadelphia, PA.  This is not your traditional EMS refresher. This hands on and dynamic training is designed for law enforcement officers with a primary focus on tactical EMS (TEMS). Over the three days, a variety of instructors (all physicians) will cover the full 24 hours and core topics required by the NREMT. In addition to TEMS, the training will also touch on a wide range of other EMS related topics that hold particular interest to law enforcement, including tactical athlete, K9 down, and WMD/toxins. The training will also feature a highly advanced training mannequin for use throughout the last day for in depth TEMS scenarios.  Class size is limited to 25 students.  This training is expected to fill up fast.  No tuition; travel, tuition and per diem must be paid by the benefiting account.  Restaurant, lodging and travel options in the Philadelphia area are numerous.  The training site in the park is walking distance to hotels and other cultural attractions.  The Hotel Monaco, adjacent to the park, is offering a government rate of $139 based on availability.  Follow the link to make reservations: https://gc.synxis.com/rez.aspx?Hotel=56524&Chain=10179&promo=GFD. For information and course applications, please contact Sinclair_Rehberg@nps.gov.  Applications must be received by February 6th. 

February 23 – February 27 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Refresher Instructor Training, Tucson, AZ. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is January 5th.

February 23 – March 6 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Instructor Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is January 6th.

February 23 – March 6 – Use of Force Instructor Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is January 6th.

February 24 – April 1 – DOI Land Management Investigator Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is December 18th.

February 24 – February 26Divine Disorder; Conference on the Conservation of Folk and Outsider Art, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA. This conference is focused on highlighting the underappreciated decorative works of non-traditional artists. The conservation of these works is vital to preserving the life story of those artists outside the mainstream art community. For more information, go to the event webpage at http://ncptt.nps.gov/blog/divine-disorder-2015/; or contact Jason Church: 318-356-7444 or jason_church@contractor.nps.gov.

March 9 – March 20 – Law Enforcement Fitness Coordinator Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is January 12th.

March 11 – March 12 – Skills for WebEx Moderators, 2:00 - 4:00 pm ET. In this training, you will learn how to support the instructor on the WebEx Training platform.  Learn to add supplemental class materials, set up polls and monitor learner activity.  Register in DOI Learn by March 1st.  Contact Jo_Robinson@nps.gov if more information is needed. 

March 16 – March 20 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Refresher Instructor Training, FLETC, Glynco, GA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is January 30th.

March 18 – Getting Ready for Campaign Launch, Part II, webinar, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. Eastern. The Centennial Office is hosting webinars on ways in which employees and partners can learn about NPS preparations for the upcoming centennial. Conference line: 1-888-455-3079; verbal pass code: Service. Space is limited. Reserve your Webinar seat now at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/743189369 .

March 24 – March 26Fiber Identification and Analysis for Conservation, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Houston, TX. This course covers basic polarized light microscopy (PLM) and methods of sampling, characterization and identification mammalian hair and selected natural and synthetic fibers. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on exercises involving sample preparation and specimen manipulation as well as the characterization and identification of real life specimens. For more information go to the event webpage at http://ncptt.nps.gov/events/fiber-identification-and-analysis-for-conservation/; or contact Jason Church: 318-356-7444 or jason_church@contractor.nps.gov.

March 25 – March 27 - International Workshop on the Conservation and Restoration of Earthen Architecture or TICRAT (Taller Internacional de Conservación y Restauración de Arquitectura de Tierra), Alamos, Mexico. This workshop series is a bi-national, hands-on event focused on techniques and strategies for conserving and restoring earthen architecture and components such as adobe, lime plaster, and painted plaster. This year’s event will involve presentations, workshops, and field trips in and around Alamos Sonora, a well-preserved 17th century Spanish Colonial town located in the tropical deciduous forest of Mexico’s Sierra Madre Mountains. All costs for selected NPS employees, including transportation between the home park unit and Alamos, hotel, local travel, and meals will be provided. NPS staff participation is limited to 15 and requires preliminary registration to ensure equitable representation from multiple parks. Final registration will require a passport and superintendent-approved international travel authorization form. Preliminary registration is due by December 1st. To register contact Starr Herr-Cardillo, TICRAT coordinator, at (520) 271-3014 or seherr@email.arizona.edu. For copies of the flyer and registration form, got to http://www.nps.gov/tuma/historyculture/ticrat.htm. For more information, visit the Missions Initiative website, www.missions.arizona.edu.

April 28 – April 29 – Landscape Preservation: An Introduction, Sitka National Historical Park, Sitka, AK. This training introduces students to the concept of cultural landscapes, including designed, vernacular, and ethnographic landscapes and historic sites.  Student then learn applicable laws and regulations, and discuss how to identify and inventory character-defining features of a landscape. Instructors then explore preservation planning and documentation, and how to develop a cultural landscape report to use in managing historic and cultural landscapes. Case studies illustrate realistic approaches to effective landscape management and preservation. Applications are due by April 14th. Details on the seminar can be found on the National Preservation Institute website (www.npi.org).  For more information, contact Brinnen Carter at 907-747-0140, orBrinnen_Carter@nps.gov.

April 30 – Landscape Preservation: Advanced Tools for Managing Change, Sitka National Historical Park, Sitka, AK. Students will explore issues that direct the process of change and decision-making for challenging landscapes. Instructors will then review the practices of inventorying, evaluating, treating, and maintaining landscape resources and discuss the implications of each, identifying tools and techniques for managing change when difficult issues affect the process. Students should come to understand the philosophical foundations for making sound, educated decisions about preserving and managing historic and cultural landscapes over the long-term. Applications are due by April 14th. Details on the seminar can be found on the National Preservation Institute website (www.npi.org).  For more information, contact Brinnen Carter at 907-747-0140, orBrinnen_Carter@nps.gov.

May 4 – May 8 – Archeological Resources Protection Training, Gettysburg NMP, Gettysburg, PA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is March 13th.

May 4, 2015 – April 15, 2016 – Facility Manager Leaders Program. This national award winning curriculum is designed to develop and strengthen selectees’ knowledge and competencies in asset management, operations and maintenance, project management, resource stewardship, business management, supervision and leadership. This is a competency based training opportunity; it is not an intake program.  Selected candidates will be enrolled in an intensive year-long program involving 20 to 28 weeks of study, classes and activities. To apply, log onto DOI Learn and enter “Facility Manager Leaders Program” in the search field. IMPORTANT: All six parts of the on-line application must be completed no later than January 16th. For additional information, contact Dave Hartman at 202-513-7070.

Online Training

Web Authoring

NPS Basic Web. The basic course covers the topics that web authors need to effectively communicate via NPS websites—both internal and external. The basic course introduces students to web terminology, content strategy, accessibility, writing for the web, image selection/editing, PDF usage, web analytics, web support, and content management system (CMS) basics. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF2013.

NPS Intermediate Web. The intermediate course builds on topics covered in the basic course (above) to give park or program web coordinators (or any interested web author) resources for managing content on NPS websites. The intermediate course goes into more depth about content strategy, web analytics, accessibility, shared content on NPS.gov, and content management system (CMS) elements. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF4017

Natural Resources

Introduction to the Career Academy for Natural Resources. This two-hour on-line training orients learners to the natural resource and science career path within the National Park Service. It explains the role of the natural resource professional within the NPS, and introduces the concepts of ethical conduct, scientific integrity, interdisciplinary networks and building and maintaining professional credibility. Students will address their career development by exploring ways to design and implement professional development plans. Introduction to the Career Academy for Natural Resources is the first unit in the course of study being developed for the Foundational Natural Resource series of the Career Academy for Natural Resources. The Foundational Series is designed to help employees achieve the natural resource competencies at the entry/developmental level. It may also benefit natural resource professionals at any level who are new to the National Park Service. This course is available through DOI Learn. The course code is NPS-NRS1501. Cost: Free. To learn more about the Career Academy for Natural Resources, visit the website at http://www.nps.gov/training/nrs/academy/academy.html. For more information, please contact Jeri Hall, jeri_hall@nps.gov.

Cultural Resources

Nationwide Programmatic Agreement Toolkit. To help guide NPS staff on implementing the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement, which governs Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the NPS has developed a “toolkit.” The toolkit is mandatory training that provides guidance to NPS superintendents and Section 106 coordinators, division chiefs, and facilities staff at region and park levels on using the programmatic agreement during Section 106 review. NPS employees may earn a certificate for their review of the toolkit through DOI Learn by taking a final assessment. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the toolkit website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The toolkit website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/history/howto/PAToolkit/index.htm. For more information about the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement toolkit, please contact: Jeffrey Durbin, NPS Section 106 compliance program officer, at 202-354-1816 or Jeffrey_durbin@nps.gov

Managing Archeological Collections. Learn about caring for archeological collections and help to overcome the curation crisis. The course is designed to assist those who are interested in, or need to learn more about, preserving and managing archeological collections over the long term. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/collections/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Archeology for Interpreters. Through this training, interpreters and anyone with an interest and need to know – including law enforcement rangers, natural resource experts, and managers -- may gain basic knowledge about archeology. The course provides opportunities to learn about archeological methods and analysis and how to encourage concern for the preservation and protection of archeological resources. A park-based case study provides practice. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/AforI/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Interpretation for Archeologists. Archeologists and other resource professionals can take this training to gain a firm foundation in and understanding of the purpose, philosophy, and techniques of interpretation. The course encourages archeologists to frame their work for the public and to work with interpreters to integrate archeological perspectives into interpretive products and tell compelling stories.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/IforA/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Study Tour of Archeological Interpretation. View interpretation with “fresh eyes” to evaluate choices and strategies for interpreting archeology in parks and historic sites. Download worksheets to assist in evaluating both onsite interpretation and virtual visits.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/studytour/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Assessment of Archeological Interpretation. Use the interpretive analysis model to evaluate the effectiveness of interpreting archeological resources on the basis of visitor experience at the levels of short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and audience feedback. Learn more about the National Park Service evaluation strategy. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/aiassess/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Wilderness

The Wilderness Act of 1964. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Writing a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Evaluating a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Deciding to Keep Wilderness Wild: Four Cornerstones for Wilderness Managers. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Stewardship Planning Framework. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Visitor Use Management. A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Strategies, and Monitoring Impacts and Uses.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Natural Resource Management in Wilderness. A suite of twelve courses: Fundamentals, Challenges in Natural Resource Restoration, Monitoring, Evaluating Proposals for Scientific Activity, Fish and Wildlife, Fish and Wildlife Inventory and Monitoring, Threatened and Endangered Species, Air Quality, Soil and Water, Vegetation, Soundscapes, and Night Sky.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Cultural Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this linkfor course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Paleontological Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Retirement

Firefighter/Law Enforcement Officer Retirement Training for Human Resource Specialists, Managers and Supervisors. This course is designed to provide firefighter and law enforcement officer retirement training for human resources specialists, managers and supervisors. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

FERS Retirement Training for Firefighters and Law Enforcement Officers. This course is designed to provide firefighters and law enforcement officers with information on FERS special retirement provisions so that they can manage their careers in such a way that they maximize their benefits. Special retirement provisions apply to employees occupying these positions and they have specific responsibilities that are critical to know about and act upon throughout their careers if they expect to qualify for special retirement. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

Supervision

New Supervisor Development Program. This new training and development program, which was begun last year, is designed specifically for first-time supervisors within the 12 month probationary period of their initial appointment. The New Supervisor Development Program (NSDP) is a blended learning program that is delivered both online and in residential (three day) sessions across the country in collaboration with Bureau of Land Management, and the Fish and Wildlife Service. The online modules (completely free of cost) are available on DOILearn as preliminary work, and include the basics of in knowledge and skills for a first-time supervisor. Completion of these modules is followed by a three day Supervisory Skills Workshop (SSW) that provides synthesis and skills practice. The NSDP satisfies the initial 40-hour new supervisory training required by OPM (5CFR 412.202). There will be no cost to parks and regions in FY 2014 – all costs (tuition and travel) are being funded by WASO Learning and Development. Registrations for the SSW are managed via regional employee development officers by slot allocation.  For more information, please contact Katrina Roberts, NSDP Training Manager, 202-354-1471, or Katherine Callaway, 202-354-1403, or your regional employee development officer.  Additional information can be found at: http://www.nps.gov/training/ - click on Leadership Development Programs.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES



Tumacácori National Historical Park (AZ)
GS-0025-7/9 Interpretive Ranger

Tumacácori National Historical Park is seeking candidates for a position as a permanent, subject-to-furlough interpretive ranger. Fluency in Spanish is required.

The person in this position serves as a lead interpreter, managing visitor center and interpretive operations with primarily volunteer staff. Duties include:

  • Managing the park’s historic craft demonstration program;
  • Managing the federal fee program;
  • Managing the special use permit program;
  • Managing the visitor center;
  • Researching, developing and presenting a variety of interpretive programs, including first-person living history;
  • Producing written interpretive material and interpretive media, including publications, exhibits, and e-media;
  • Designing, creating and producing interpretive products such as waysides and displays using digital applications.

Fluency in spoken and written Spanish is required.

Tumacácori is a small park located in southern Arizona, 45 miles south of Tucson and 19 miles north of the international border.  One of the older units within the National Park System, Tumacácori was first established as a national monument in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt.  The park preserves and interprets three Spanish colonial missions, two of which were first established in 1691.  Tumacácori plays an important role in preserving these sites and their stories, and provides a strong link to the area’s multi-cultural heritage.  The park includes a one-mile stretch of the Santa Cruz River, and the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail traverses the park. 

Government housing is available, but not required.  A variety of affordable housing (both rental and for purchase) is available in the communities of Nogales, Rio Rico, Tubac, Green Valley and Tucson.  All major amenities are available in the Tucson area, including excellent health care, an international airport and The University of Arizona.

For additional information please contact Chief of Interpretation and Education Anita Badertscher at (520) 377-5063. 

It closes on December 12th.
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Natchez Trace Parkway (AL,MS,TN)
GS-0025-7/9 Interpretive Rangers

Natchez Trace Parkway has issued an announcement for two interpretive rangers. Click on the link below for a copy of the announcement with full details on duties, area information, and procedures for applying.

Both rangers selected will be responsible for assisting in the planning, management and coordination of interpretive, educational and visitor center operations. One will serve as the operations lead for the Parkway Visitor Center in Tupelo, Mississippi; the other will work out of Tupelo, but serve as the seasonal supervisor for the Meriwether Lewis site near Hohenwald, Tennessee (approximately 2.5 hours north of Tupelo). 

Duties for both positions at the full performance level include but are not limited to supervision, special events planning, personal services planning and oversight, interpretive training, coaching and auditing of interpretive programming and development and presentation of interpretive programs.  They will also be responsible for writing and editing grant/PMIS proposals, working with Harpers Ferry Center in the development, writing and editing of new interpretive waysides, participating in the development of the parkway’s long range interpretive plan, developing interpretive and informational web and social media content, and contributing to the development of other non-personal services as required. They will provide a full range of interpretive and educational programming and services, including formal public programs, informal visitor contacts, roving interpretation, education programs, and special programs on request.

These rangers will be relied upon to provide strategic planning and operational information to the chief of interpretation and the management staff.  Park resources are complex, and include the potential for a wide range of natural and cultural history interpretation.  In addition to the 444-mile parkway, staff also administer Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail, Brices Cross Roads National Battlefield Site and Tupelo National Battlefield and work with two National Heritage Areas. 

Natchez Trace Parkway averages over 6 million recreational visitors, and is adjacent to over two million residents in multiple communities along the length of the park and has many formal and informal partners. While the parkway experiences peak tourism seasons in spring and fall, interpretive work with park partners, schools and other organizations continues throughout the year.

It closes on December 21st.
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White Sands National Monument (NM)
GS-1101-9 Revenue and Fee Program Specialist

White Sands National Monument is seeking candidates for a term revenue and fee program specialist position.

The person selected for this position will oversee and supervise the monument’s fee revenue collection program, including supervising up to three full time equivalent positions and managing the revenue collection and cost of collection operation.  She/he will also maintain and manage the monument’s special park use and commercial use programs, including managing all film and photography permit applications, and will assist with the contractual compliance and policy implementation monitoring of the monument’s concession operations.

White Sands National Monument welcomes an average of 480,000 visitors per year.  It is the most visited National Park Service site in New Mexico.  White Sands is a unique geologic park where world-renowned scientists work to reveal the secrets of this biologically, culturally, and geologically diverse treasure.  Just in the past five years, researchers discovered more than 15 new species of moths; used the gypsum dunes as an analog to the gypsum dunes on Mars to gain a better understanding of the Red Planet; and employed cutting-edge imaging technology to learn more about the mammoth, dire wolf, and other Pleistocene mega-fauna track ways found in the dune field.

The announcement closes on December 12th.  For more information and to apply, click on the link below.

Specific questions regarding this position may be directed to Chief Ranger Joseph Roberts at 575 479-6124 X 220 or joe_roberts@nps.gov.
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