The Morning Report

Friday, August 01, 2014

Recent Editions  

INCIDENTS



Bryce Canyon National Park (UT)
Visitor Seriously Injured When Thrown By Mule

On Saturday, July 26th, rangers received an emergency call reporting that a trail rider had been thrown by a mule during a guided trip on the Peekaboo loop trail and been seriously injured.

Rangers assembled a rescue team that included personnel from Garfield County EMS and Tropic Fire and Rescue. A medical team determined that an air evacuation would be needed, as the nearest trauma center is four hours away and the accident had occurred two-and-a-half miles from the nearest trailhead.

A Classic Lifeguard helicopter from Page, Arizona, flew to the park and picked up the injured visitor at a landing zone established by rescuers. The injured visitor was taken to Utah Valley Regional Medical Center in Provo, Utah, for treatment for a pelvis fracture and shattered collarbone.

[Submitted by David Sutherland, Park Ranger]


Bryce Canyon National Park (UT)
Lightning Strike Injures Park Visitor

The park received a report last Monday of a visitor down and unconscious and in need of medical assistance on the Rim Trail. A storm had recently passed through the area, bringing heavy rain and lightning.

Rangers began a hasty search along the trail and found the visitor suffering seizures off to the side of the trail between Sunset and Inspiration Points. Initial signs and symptoms indicated that the visitor had likely been the victim of lightning side splash, as a tree several feet away had recently been struck by lightning.

An ambulance from Garfield County EMS was soon on scene. The patient was transferred to the burn unit at University of Utah Medical Center for further care.

[Submitted by David Sutherland, Park Ranger]


NEWS AND NOTES



Petersburg National Battlefield (VA)
Battle Of The Crater Commemorated

On July 30th, Petersburg National Battlefield commemorated the 150th anniversary of the Battle of the Crater with real-time tours of the battlefield, a commemorative ceremony, and first-day-of-issue ceremonies for the new “Civil War 1864: Petersburg Campaign Forever” stamp. 

During the Siege of Petersburg in the summer of 1864, Union forces under General Ulysses S. Grant tunneled beneath the siege lines and on July 30, 1864 detonated 8,000 pounds of gunpowder directly beneath the Confederate position.

The explosion opened a 200-foot-wide gap in the Confederate lines, but Grant’s men were unable to capitalize on the opportunity.  Following 10 hours of desperate fighting, the Confederates had sealed the gap and the position of the armies remained unchanged, at a cost of more than 5,000 casualties.

To open the anniversary programming, more than 400 participants showed up in the pre-dawn hours for a real-time tour of the opening phase of the battle.  In addition to the park’s living history artillery crew, soldiers from Fort Lee, Virginia, provided three modern 75mm pack howitzers to help recreate the smoke and sound of the battle.

The commemorative ceremony featured the first-day-of issue and unveiling of the new Petersburg postage stamp. The stamp depicts the 22nd United States Colored Troops engaged in the opening assault on Petersburg.  USCTs were among the first to seize outlying Confederate works at Petersburg when the Union army made an unsuccessful push to capture the city in June 1864.

The ceremony also featured remarks by Superintendent Lewis Rogers, Historian James Blankenship, Chief Postal Inspector Guy Cottrell of the United States Postal Service, and a keynote address by Fort Lee Garrison Commander Colonel Paul Brooks.

The Battle of the Crater sesquicentennial events continue this weekend with living history and historic weapons demonstrations, panel discussions on the military and civilian impacts of the siege, interpretive programs and more.

[Submitted by Mike Litterst, Office of Communications]


Northeast Region
EPA Awards Grant For Lower Delaware Canoemobile

On July 17th, the Environmental Protection Agency announced the recipients of the 2014 Urban Waters Small Grants Program, including Wilderness Inquiry for the Lower Delaware Canoemobile.

The Canoemobile is a roving fleet of six 24-foot, 10-passenger Voyageur canoes that travels the country on a mission to get as many youth as possible out paddling on their local urban waterways.

The Lower Delaware Canoemobile will create opportunities for minority and underserved youth in the four largest cities along the Lower Delaware River—Camden, New Jersey; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Chester, Pennsylvania; and Wilmington, Delaware—to experience, enjoy, and learn about the Delaware River and its tributaries.

Each canoe holds up to nine students and one highly trained outdoor educator, allowing participants to have their first paddling experience without any special gear or prior boating or swimming knowledge required. 

The Lower Delaware Canoemobile program is a multi-partner effort, coordinated by the NPS Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance Program. Last year the Canoemobile spent one day in each of the cities listed above, and engaged nearly 500 youth and 35 partner organizations. This year, the EPA grant will help the partners to expand their impact by spending three days in each city.

Over this time, as many as 2,400 underserved school children will paddle the Delaware River or a major tributary, learn about the watershed and their community, and collect water samples for analysis and study. 

In total, EPA awarded $2.1 million to support worthwhile projects working to advance urban waters efforts across the country. Out of over 90 proposals received, 37 awards are being made to recipients in 17 of the 18 Federal Partnership locations. To view the full list of the selected projects, click here.

[Submitted by Sophie Sarkar, sophie_sarkar@nps.gov, 215.597.2136]


Fort Union National Monument (NM)
Fort Union Days Celebration Held

Fort Union National Monument celebrated its annual Fort Union Days weekend event on June 21st and 22nd. 

This year’s event focused on the 1870’s period of the fort and its role in the “Indian Wars,” including the Red River War of 1874.  Fort Union (1851-1891) was the largest frontier military post and supply center in the southwest.

The weekend included guest speakers on Army frontier medicine, the life of American Indians,  the impacts of the “Indian Wars” and Westward expansion on the environment and inhabitants of the Great Plains, cultural dances from local  Hispanic tradition, and dances of the Jicarilla Apache Nation. 

The event also included living history groups, including the Artillery Company of New Mexico and Fort Union’s Company A of the 3rd New Mexico Volunteer Infantry. It concluded with a night sky program. 

[Submitted by Lorenzo Vigil]


Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site (CO)
Trading Cards Help Convey Tragic Anniversary

This coming November 29th will mark the 150th anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre. To assist staff in conveying the massacre story to its younger visitors, the park has developed six new educational “trading” cards as part of the National Park Service’s “From Civil War to Civil Rights” trading card program.

On November 29, 1864, troops of the First and Third Regiments Cavalry, Colorado Volunteers, attacked a peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho village on the banks of the Big Sandy Creek, despite the presence of an American flag and white flag of truce. During the attack, soldiers killed about 200 Cheyenne and Arapaho, mostly women, children and elderly, and mutilated many of their bodies.

The Cheyenne and Arapaho camped at Sand Creek under assurances of protection by the United States Army. The subsequent attack, execution of prisoners and mutilation of the dead represented some of the most egregious violations of human rights then known.

Accounts of atrocities committed by the troops quickly spread across the country, prompting two congressional investigations and a military inquiry. In 1865, as part of the Treaty of the Little Arkansas, the United States government accepted responsibility for and condemned the attack.  

Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site is Colorado’s only officially recognized Civil War site. Many of the troops of the First Regiment volunteered for service in 1861 in response to an anticipated Confederate invasion of the Colorado territory. 

The First Regiment experienced its baptism of fire as an infantry unit against Confederate forces during the Battles of Apache Canyon and Glorieta Pass in 1862. Many of these same veterans later refused orders to attack the Cheyenne and Arapaho at Sand Creek and testified against those who did.

Sand Creek Massacre NHS is one of the most recent parks to commemorate its stories through the National Park Service’s “From Civil War to Civil Rights” trading card program.

“The cards highlight some of the people, places, and events associated with the story of the Sand Creek Massacre and its Civil War connection,” said Superintendent Alexa Roberts. “The cards provide a unique way of connecting stories of parks across the country for young visitors.”

[Submitted by Shawn Gillette]


Servicewide
Upcoming Training Calendar

All training offerings – webinars, online courses and training sessions in the field – appear in this listing only, updated each Friday. Entries must be received by midday Thursday at the latest for the following day’s update. Send them to Bill_Halainen@contractor.nps.gov.

All entries must be brief and should have the following:

  • Beginning and ending dates.
  • Name and location of course.
  • A short one- to two-line description.
  • The closing date for application or registration.
  • Name(s) and number(s) for more information.
  • Most importantly, a link to a website where full announcements or detailed information can be found.

New listings and revisions to this week’s calendar are in bold face. They are removed from the calendar once the application deadline has passed.

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Training and Webinars

August 4 – August 8 – Archeological Resources Protection Training, Valley Forge NHP, PA. This 37-hour course provides training in all aspects of an archeological investigation and prosecution. The class culminates in a 12-hour archeological crime scene practical exercise where law enforcement officers and archeologist work as a team to investigate and document a crime scene. Attendees will gather and process physical evidence, write incident reports, executive summaries, search warrants, damage assessments, and provide testimony in a courtroom scenario. This training is open to all law enforcement officers, prosecutors, and Federal archeologists. NPS employees should contact Wiley Golden at (912) 267-2246 for registration. Other Federal employees should contact their national academy representatives at FLETC to register. Contact FLETC instructor Charles Louke (912) 280-5138 for course information.

August 5 – August 7 – Compliance with Section 106 and NEPA: Southeast Regional Office. See full announcement here.  Contact: Beth Byrd; beth_byrd@nps.gov or 404-507-5793.

August 20 – August 21 – Sig Sauer Armorer Course, Big Cypress NP, FL. The program content focuses on the mechanical functioning, maintenance, troubleshooting, and field repair of the Sig Sauer law enforcement classic pistol line, including the P220, P226, P228, P229, and P239 pistols. This is a hand’s on program that teaches and guides each participant through all armorer operations, step by step with the instructor. To register online please go to www.sigsaueracademy.com. Click on “Courses,” then “Armorer Courses,” then “Sig Sauger Pistols (Classic),” then “Schedule.” Register for “Ochopee.” You can also register by phone by contacting the academy training coordinator at 603-610-3411. For more information, please contact Luke_Conrad@nps.gov. The tuition is $415. The deadline for applying is August 1st.

August 21 – Introduction to Internship Program Evaluation Webinar, 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. EDT. Internships are one of the most important ways that the NPS employs to introduce a younger generation to the tradition of stewardship of our nation’s natural and cultural resources. This webinar is a short introduction to program evaluation for NPS professionals who work with internship programs.  It will provide valuable tools you can use to document the achievements of your program.  A program evaluation identifies, discovers, generates and displays information about an organization's program effectiveness. NPS employees should apply online using DOI Learn. If you do not have access to DOI Learn, email a copy of your SF-182 training form with supervisory approval to Brigitte_Keels@nps.gov or fax to (202) 371-6747 no later than August 14th.  Please submit all questions and concerns regarding this training to the course coordinator: Erica Austin, Program Analyst, WASO Youth Programs, 1201 Eye St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone:  202-513-7177.

August 26 – April 27 – Fundamentals of Section 106: Midwest Region, Minneapolis, MN. See full announcement here.  Contact: Stephen Rogers; stephen_rogers@nps.gov or 402-661-1912.

August 26 – August 28 – Fundamentals of Section 106: Pacific West Region, Fort Vancouver NHS. See full announcement here. Contact: Cari Kreshak; cari_kreshak@nps.gov or 808-228-5334.

August 27 – Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces Webinar: The Bison – Going Beyond The Symbol, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. EDT. For the past year, three associate directorates – Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion; Interpretation, Education, and Volunteers; and Cultural Resources, Partnerships and Science – have been partnering with George Washington University’s Museum Studies department to develop a series of training events open to all NPS employees, partners, and the general public. “Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces” consists of two webinars – the first on August 27th and the second on September 3rd – and a two-day symposium on September 17th and 18th. This first webinar will unpack the symbol of the bison and explore how new collaborations are working to heal the wounds of the past.  Speakers:  Glenn Plumb, Chief Wildlife Biologist, Wildlife Conservation Branch; Reed Robinson, Superintendent, Devils Tower NM; Albert LeBeau, CR Program Manager, Effigy Mounds NM; Jim Stone, Executive Director, Inter Tribal Buffalo Council; Trudy Ecoffey, Tribal Liaison Pine Ridge, Natural Resources Conservation Service, US Department of Agriculture; Keith Aune, Wildlife Conservation Society. NPS employees should register online at http://goo.gl/acITld for individual sessions or the full training event.  Information on accessing the webinars and the webcast will be sent to all registrants. Employees are strongly encouraged to attend the full training event and may receive credit by also enrolling through DOI LEARN no later than August 25th. For more information, go to this link or contact Sangita Chari, Special Assistant to the Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion, National Park Service, Phone:  (202) 354-2203, Email: office_rdi@nps.gov .

September 3 – Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces Webinar: Relevancy, Diversity and Inclusion – Expanding National Park Service Narratives, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. EDT. For the past year, three associate directorates – Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion; Interpretation, Education, and Volunteers; and Cultural Resources, Partnerships and Science – have been partnering with George Washington University’s Museum Studies department to develop a series of training events open to all NPS employees, partners, and the general public. “Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces” consists of two webinars – the first on August 27th and the second on September 3rd – and a two-day symposium on September 17th and 18th. This second webinar will focus on diversity. The National Park Service recognizes that America's diversity has given this country its unique strength, resilience, and richness. The Service also recognizes that its greatest promise in the 21st century cannot be achieved unless we improve on our record of including the diversity of the nation in all of the National Park Service's activities. Speakers:  Michael Reynolds, Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy, and Inclusion; Julia Washburn, Associate Director, Interpretation, Education, and Volunteers; Steve Pitti, NPS Advisory Board Member, Professor of History and American Studies, Director of the Program in Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, and Master of Ezra Stiles College at Yale University; Milton Chen, NPS Advisory Board Member, Senior Fellow, The George Lucas Educational Foundation, Edutopia.org & Edutopia video. NPS employees should register online at http://goo.gl/acITld for individual sessions or the full training event.  Information on accessing the webinars and the webcast will be sent to all registrants. Employees are strongly encouraged to attend the full training event and may receive credit by also enrolling through DOI LEARN no later than August 25th. For more information, go to this link or contact Sangita Chari, Special Assistant to the Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion, National Park Service, Phone:  (202) 354-2203, Email: office_rdi@nps.gov .

September 8 – September 11 – NAGPRA in the Parks, webinar. This online course about the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) will provide an overview of NAGPRA and prepare participants to respond to inadvertent discoveries and plan for intentional excavations as prescribed by the law. This is a multiple session course consisting of four two-hour sessions on consecutive days. Detailed information can be found in the full announcement. To register, email mary_carroll@nps.gov by August 27th. Contact: Mary S. Carroll, mary_carroll@nps.gov or 303-969-2300.

September 9 – September 10 – Distance Education Technology Transfer Workshop, Cabrillo NM, San Diego, CA. This course is designed to provide end users (interpreters, education specialists, resource managers, fire managers or information technology staff) with the resources and knowledge necessary to assemble a Telexploration backpack and present a real-time distance learning program to a remote audience and to design and deploy a basic wireless systems sufficient to present real-time live Telexploration programs in your park. The closing date for applications is August 15th. For more information on the workshop, go to this web page: http://seatoshiningsea.org/events_New.html. Contact: Amanda Gossard at amanda_gossard@nps.gov.

September 9 – September 11 – Structural Firefighter Recertification and Refresher Course, Grand Canyon NP, AZ. This three-day class satisfies the refresher requirements for NPS Structural Firefighters as outlined in Chapter 12 of Reference Manual 58, NPS Structural Fire Management. The course is designed to refresh the skills, knowledge and competencies of previously certified structural firefighting personnel through the utilization of live fire scenarios. NPS live fire qualified instructors direct the training in compliance with NFPA 1403 and OSHA requirements. Application deadline is August 11th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

September 15 – October 17 – National Search & Rescue Academy, Camp Navajo, Bellemont. AZ. The National Park Service in conjunction with the Department of Defense will conduct this year’s fall session of the National Search & Rescue Academy at Camp Navajo, which is ten miles west of Flagstaff, Arizona. NSARA provides an intensive five-week comprehensive SAR training program for federal employees. This program will provide participants with a venue to efficiently attain basic field rescuer skills in a single condensed format which typically requires several years of career development. This core program provides participants with essential field rescue skills in ground search operations, ICS, swiftwater rescue, technical rope rescue, search management, basic aviation safety, helicopter rescue techniques, and remote/austere EMS techniques. This program is delivered in the classroom and various physically challenging outdoor environments. To broaden interagency cooperation, allied and federal agency personnel will jointly attend this academy. NSARA participants will be housed in shared military barrack style quarters during the training and are required to adhere to all local policies of the hosting facility. On-site lodging and meals during the academy will be provided at no expense to NPS participants. En route travel and per diem costs, as well lodging and meals associated with three days of off-site swiftwater training, will be borne by the benefiting work unit. This is a very physically demanding course and participants are required to perform at an arduous level without physical, mental, or emotional limitations. Participants will be involved in physical fitness training, which will be completed through the Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test, and participants are required to achieve a “First Class PFT Score” by the end of the academy. Prerequisites: In addition to completion of independent study classes on Basic ICS and SAR, candidates must possess a current minimum certification at the First Responder or Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) level. For further information on this training, refer to the announcement and nomination form at this link. Submit completed nomination forms to NSARA Coordinator Ken Phillips, NPS Branch Chief of Search & Rescue, at ken_phillips@nps.gov or 928-606-3862 (cell). Nominations are due by August 15th.

September 16 – September 17 – NEPA/NHPA Section 106 Workshop: Intermountain Region, Grand Canyon NP. See full announcement here.  Contact: Cheryl Eckhardt; cheryl_eckhardt@nps.gov or 303-969-2851.

September 17 – September 18 – Symposium: Co-Creating Narratives in Public Spaces. The two-day symposium will create a forum for NPS administrators and interpreters, academics, museum professionals, anthropologists, and public historians from across the country to discuss how the National Park Service can best define and communicate the complex and challenging narratives that comprise the history of the United States. Scheduled panelists include representatives from NPS sites including Fort Smith National Historic Site; Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site; Manzanar; Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site; Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front National Historic Site. Participating museums include the National Museum of the American Indian; US Holocaust Memorial Museum; National Museum of African American History and Culture; Harriet Beecher Stowe Center; and the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. In addition, academics, independent historians, and anthropologists will participate. NPS staff can participate in person or view the two day symposium via a live webcast. NPS employees should register online at http://goo.gl/acITld for individual sessions or the full training event.  Information on accessing the webinars and the webcast will be sent to all registrants. Employees are strongly encouraged to attend the full training event and may receive credit by also enrolling through DOI LEARN no later than August 25th. For more information, go to this link or contact Sangita Chari, Special Assistant to the Associate Director, Workforce, Relevancy and Inclusion, National Park Service, Phone:  (202) 354-2203, Email: office_rdi@nps.gov .

September 23 – September 25 – Firearms Instructor Refresher Training, Alameda County Sheriff’s Office, Dublin, CA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is August 13th.

September 30 – October 3 – Law Enforcement Control Tactics Refresher Instructor Training, Yosemite, CA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is August 15th.

September 30 – October 2 – Conference On Preservation And Stewardship Of Historic Places, Yellowstone NP, WY. This conference is for those historic and rustic architecture practitioners who are looking to build new skills and network with professionals and craftspeople in the field. The conference will provide opportunities to learn and exchange ideas through hands-on experiences, classroom presentations and facilitated dialog. Participants can earn up to 16 AIA CEU continuing education credits. The tuition is $395. For more information and to register, go to http://www.preservemontana.org/ynprustic/ .

October 6 – October 10 – Structural Firefighter I (Defensive Firefighter) Course, Gateway NRA (Sandy Hook Unit), NJ. This 40-hour course is designed to provide basic training at the NFPA 1001, Firefighter I level with the minimum skills necessary to function safely and effectively as a member of a structural firefighting team under direct supervision. Course emphasis is on individual and engine company manipulative skills essential for personal safety and efficiency in support of defensive (exterior) operations with limited offensive skills targeting trash and vehicle fires and indirect attacks in the suppression of structural fires. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is September 8th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

October 13 – October 24 – Structural Firefighter I/II Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1001 training standards to be qualified as a Structural Firefighter I and II. Participants will be able to perform both interior and exterior attacks during structural fire events. The course presents students with a strenuous hands-on curriculum that includes extensive training scenarios and live-fire drills. Students will be afforded numerous opportunities to develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed serve as a structural firefighter.  Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. For formal accreditation through the National Board of Fire Service Professional Qualifications (Pro Board), participants must complete all associated courses and pre-requests. Application deadline is September 15th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

October 20 – October 31 – Use of Force Instructor Training, New Braintree, MA. Click on this link for the course announcement; contact Wiley Golden at FLETC (912-267-2246) with any questions. The deadline for applications is August 28th.

October 21 – October 22 - Find 'Em: Initial Response Incident Commander, Estes Park, CO. Learn about the state-of-the-art in missing person search planning. This interactive workshop will introduce the newest and most comprehensive textbook on search and rescue management, focus on the duties and responsibilities of the initial response incident commander, and provide instruction on the use of WinCASIE search incident computer software.  Tuition is $25. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 25 people.

October 22 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Keeping Good People Good, Estes Park, CO. NPS employees begin their careers as passionate, idealistic, enthusiastic people who are often heard saying “I can’t believe they pay me to do this job.” With time, they are exposed to the subtle day-to-day pressures and demands that can be devastating to even the most experienced and capable people. This presentation is aimed at helping the participants develop a personal strategy to prevent the day-to-day pressures from destroying the very things they work so hard to build. They will learn techniques to help create the balance and resilience that is essential for their long-term professional and personal wellbeing. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 22 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Management’s Role in Keeping Good People Good, Estes Park, CO. Organizations spend a significant amount of time, energy and money hiring and training good people, but that is just the beginning. After the hiring process is over, managers have an important role in helping Keep Good People Good. Positive leadership, a proactive approach to problem solving, the “Courage to Communicate,” and holding people respectfully accountable are key to preventing employee-related problems. Managers are responsible for the guidance, mentorship, and coaching that helps employees improve performance and achieve their full potential. This program is aimed at helping managers apply the theories of leadership & management to everyday, real-life situations and develop the practical skills needed to become more effective and confident leaders. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 23 – Jack Harris Leadership Development Workshop: Communications Skills…They Do Make a Difference, Estes Park, CO. The ability to resolve conflicts, address differences, minimize misunderstandings, interact well with others, work as a team and enhance relationships (of all kinds) is directly related to our ability to communicate. This workshop is designed for people who want to communicate more effectively, build better relationships (at work, home and play), gain a better understanding into the power of perceptions & assumptions, and are looking to have some fun learning practical communication skills they can apply to everyday, real-life situations. Tuition is $35. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 40 people.

October 23 Learning by Listening: Conducting Effective Oral History Interviews, Estes Park, CO. This workshop is a great opportunity to learn about all aspects of oral history. Participants will be introduced to oral history project planning; legal and ethical issues; recording technologies (audio and video); what to do before, during, and after the interview; processing and preserving interviews; and using oral history in Web sites and publications. Participants will conduct and critique a short interview on-site during the workshop. Tuition is $25. This workshop is part of the Association of National Park Rangers’ annual Ranger Rendezvous. However, full conference registration is not required. For more information on the workshop, visit: https://www.anpr.org/documents/RR37_PreliminaryProgram.pdf. Space limited to 20 people.

November 3 – November 14 – Fire Apparatus Driver Operator Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class fulfills NFPA 1002 training standards to be qualified as Fire Apparatus Driver Operator. The class is designed to provide persons with the technical information and skills essential for the safe operation and proper maintenance of fire apparatus. Emphasis includes hands-on training of pumping and driving skills critical to support personnel assigned to all hazard response. Personnel will become proficient in troubleshooting, hydraulics, drafting and providing water through multiple pumping evolutions. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules, class assessments and evaluations. Application deadline is October 6th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

November 4 – November 5 – Remington 870 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington 870 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

November 6 – November 7– Remington AR15 Armorer, Lake Meredith NRA, TX. The park will be hosting a Remington AR15 armorer class. Class cost is $450 and registration is done through Remington, http://www.remingtonle.com/training/14schedule.htm. There is a Holiday Inn Express in Borger that has a government rate. For more information, contact Dale Culver at Dale_Culver@nps.gov  or via phone at 806-865-3874 ext. 261

December 8 – December 12 – Fire Officer and Instructor Course, National Structural Fire Training Center, Glen Canyon NRA, AZ. This class includes certification in both Fire Instructor I and Fire Officer I. These classes have been combined as fire instructor is a required prerequisite for fire officer. The combined class is a combination of online activities with job performance skills being demonstrated in a class or field setting. Fire instructor is designed around classroom lectures, group activities, and individual presentations. Topics include learning theories, use of instructional materials and media, maintaining student records and techniques for effective communication. The fire officer portion of the class focuses on technical knowledge and leadership skills which are essential for command and control of engine company personnel during fire emergencies. Participants will be introduced to the skills of preplanning, fire attack strategies/tactics and logistical support functions. Skills are reinforced and evaluated through dynamic group sessions and video simulations. Certification is based upon completion of all on-line modules and class assessments. Access to the on-line class is available on December 9th. Application deadline is November 10th. For further information, contact Mark Gorman at 208-387-5244 or check the website at http://famshare.inside.nps.gov/structural/operations/default.aspx.

Online Training

Web Authoring

NPS Basic Web. The basic course covers the topics that web authors need to effectively communicate via NPS websites—both internal and external. The basic course introduces students to web terminology, content strategy, accessibility, writing for the web, image selection/editing, PDF usage, web analytics, web support, and content management system (CMS) basics. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF2013.

NPS Intermediate Web. The intermediate course builds on topics covered in the basic course (above) to give park or program web coordinators (or any interested web author) resources for managing content on NPS websites. The intermediate course goes into more depth about content strategy, web analytics, accessibility, shared content on NPS.gov, and content management system (CMS) elements. If you have questions about signing up for the courses in DOI Learn, please contact your directorate web manager. The course code is NPS-INF4017

Cultural Resources

Nationwide Programmatic Agreement Toolkit. To help guide NPS staff on implementing the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement, which governs Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the NPS has developed a “toolkit.” The toolkit is mandatory training that provides guidance to NPS superintendents and Section 106 coordinators, division chiefs, and facilities staff at region and park levels on using the programmatic agreement during Section 106 review. NPS employees may earn a certificate for their review of the toolkit through DOI Learn by taking a final assessment. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the toolkit website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The toolkit website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/history/howto/PAToolkit/index.htm. For more information about the NPS nationwide programmatic agreement toolkit, please contact: Jeffrey Durbin, NPS Section 106 compliance program officer, at 202-354-1816 or Jeffrey_durbin@nps.gov

Managing Archeological Collections. Learn about caring for archeological collections and help to overcome the curation crisis. The course is designed to assist those who are interested in, or need to learn more about, preserving and managing archeological collections over the long term. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/collections/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Archeology for Interpreters. Through this training, interpreters and anyone with an interest and need to know – including law enforcement rangers, natural resource experts, and managers -- may gain basic knowledge about archeology. The course provides opportunities to learn about archeological methods and analysis and how to encourage concern for the preservation and protection of archeological resources. A park-based case study provides practice. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/AforI/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Interpretation for Archeologists. Archeologists and other resource professionals can take this training to gain a firm foundation in and understanding of the purpose, philosophy, and techniques of interpretation. The course encourages archeologists to frame their work for the public and to work with interpreters to integrate archeological perspectives into interpretive products and tell compelling stories.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/IforA/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Study Tour of Archeological Interpretation. View interpretation with “fresh eyes” to evaluate choices and strategies for interpreting archeology in parks and historic sites. Download worksheets to assist in evaluating both onsite interpretation and virtual visits.  Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/studytour/index.htm.  For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Assessment of Archeological Interpretation. Use the interpretive analysis model to evaluate the effectiveness of interpreting archeological resources on the basis of visitor experience at the levels of short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and audience feedback. Learn more about the National Park Service evaluation strategy. Register for the course in DOI Learn, then review the contents of the course website before returning to DOI Learn to complete a final assessment. The course website is available online at: http://www.nps.gov/archeology/aiassess/index.htm. For more information, contact Teresa Moyer (202-354-2124, teresa_moyer@nps.gov).

Wilderness

The Wilderness Act of 1964. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Writing a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Evaluating a Minimum Requirements Analysis. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Deciding to Keep Wilderness Wild: Four Cornerstones for Wilderness Managers. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Stewardship Planning Framework. Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Wilderness Visitor Use Management. A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Strategies, and Monitoring Impacts and Uses.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Natural Resource Management in Wilderness. A suite of twelve courses: Fundamentals, Challenges in Natural Resource Restoration, Monitoring, Evaluating Proposals for Scientific Activity, Fish and Wildlife, Fish and Wildlife Inventory and Monitoring, Threatened and Endangered Species, Air Quality, Soil and Water, Vegetation, Soundscapes, and Night Sky.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Cultural Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this linkfor course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Managing Paleontological Resources in Wilderness.  A suite of three courses: Fundamentals, Inventory and Monitoring, and Evaluating Scientific Proposals.  Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center/Eppley Institute for Parks and Public Lands.  Click on this link for course information.  Contact: Tim Devine, 406-243-4612, tim_devine@nps.gov with any questions.

Retirement

Firefighter/Law Enforcement Officer Retirement Training for Human Resource Specialists, Managers and Supervisors. This course is designed to provide firefighter and law enforcement officer retirement training for human resources specialists, managers and supervisors. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

FERS Retirement Training for Firefighters and Law Enforcement Officers. This course is designed to provide firefighters and law enforcement officers with information on FERS special retirement provisions so that they can manage their careers in such a way that they maximize their benefits. Special retirement provisions apply to employees occupying these positions and they have specific responsibilities that are critical to know about and act upon throughout their careers if they expect to qualify for special retirement. Cost: Free. For more information, see DOI Learn website: http://www.doi.gov/doilearn. Registration: DOI Learn Help Desk 1-866-466-1998 or email at doilearn@geolearning.com. FLERT Contact: William (Alan) Sizemore, Alan_Sizemore@ios.doi.gov 208-334-1556.

Supervision

New Supervisor Development Program. This new training and development program, which was begun last year, is designed specifically for first-time supervisors within the 12 month probationary period of their initial appointment. The New Supervisor Development Program (NSDP) is a blended learning program that is delivered both online and in residential (three day) sessions across the country in collaboration with Bureau of Land Management, and the Fish and Wildlife Service. The online modules (completely free of cost) are available on DOILearn as preliminary work, and include the basics of in knowledge and skills for a first-time supervisor. Completion of these modules is followed by a three day Supervisory Skills Workshop (SSW) that provides synthesis and skills practice. The NSDP satisfies the initial 40-hour new supervisory training required by OPM (5CFR 412.202). There will be no cost to parks and regions in FY 2014 – all costs (tuition and travel) are being funded by WASO Learning and Development. Registrations for the SSW are managed via regional employee development officers by slot allocation.  For more information, please contact Katrina Roberts, NSDP Training Manager, 202-354-1471, or Katherine Callaway, 202-354-1403, or your regional employee development officer.  Additional information can be found at: http://www.nps.gov/training/ - click on Leadership Development Programs.  

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES



Bryce Canyon National Park (UT)
GS-0401-11 Natural Resources Specialist (Lateral)

Bryce Canyon National Park is seeking qualified candidates interested in a lateral reassignment to the position of permanent, subject-to-furlough natural resources specialist.  The yearly furlough period is expected to range from two to three pay periods.  Applications are due by August 14th.

The natural resources specialist

  • Leads the park’s vegetation management program, including native plant community inventory and monitoring, disturbed land restoration and non-native plant control. 
  • Develops resource management implementation plans and related environmental compliance documents and writes project proposals for internal and external funding opportunities. 
  • Works closely with wildlife and fire management professionals to restore native plant communities and wildlife habitat. 
  • Serves as technical specialist on park-wide planning initiatives. 
  • Coordinates wilderness management, integrated pest management, research projects, environmental management systems and GIS development. 
  • Works closely with staff from adjacent land management agencies on projects of joint concern. 
  • Supervises term, seasonal, intern and volunteer staff. 

Applicants must possess skills in program management and administration of budgets, agreements/contracts, and personnel.  

Government housing may be available on a bid basis. Permanent change of station (PCS) moving expenses will be authorized. 

Bryce Canyon National Park is an internationally renowned national park located at the summit of the Grand Staircase of the Colorado Plateau.  The spectacular geology, pristine long-range vistas, and exquisite night skies, coupled with a diversity of plant and animal life, form an awe-inspiring  environment.  Elevations vary throughout the park from 6,650 feet to 9,000 feet.   Due to the nature of the job and elevation, good physical fitness is a necessity. 

Bryce Canyon National Park is located within an area of several million acres of nationally designated conservation lands and recreational opportunities abound.  Local communities sponsor art, social and recreational events throughout the year.  

Elementary and high schools are located in nearby Tropic, UT (10 miles from Park HQ) with bus service.  Nearby communities have post offices, gas stations, grocery stores, restaurants and lodging.   The nearest medical facilities are in Panguitch (28 miles).  Cedar City (80 miles) has movie theaters, clothing stores, full-service grocery stores, and department and home improvement stores.  The park has a camper store, restaurant and lodge, open seasonally.

Visit the park website for more information at: http://www.nps.gov/brca

If interested, please submit the following by August 14th – a detailed resume or OF-612 detailing work history, educational background and any special qualifications/certifications, and your last performance appraisal. Send to Rebecca Orman, administrative assistant, at Rebecca_Orman@nps.gov  with the subject line reading “BRCA Nat Res Specialist.” 

For more info on the position, please contact Daniel Fagergren, chief of resource management and visitor protection, at 435-834-4760 or by email at Daniel_Fagergren@nps.gov.

Cultural Resources
GS-0199-5 Student Trainee (Historian)

The Cultural Resources, Partnerships, and Science Directorate is recruiting for a student trainee (historian). 

Click on the link below for a copy of the announcement with full details on duties, area information, and procedures for applying.

For additional information, contact Paul Hawke, manager of the American Battlefield Protection Program, at 202-354-2023.

It closes on August 13th.
 More Information...