• Mount Rainier peeks through clouds, viewed across subalpine wildflowers and glacial moraine.

    Mount Rainier

    National Park Washington

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Special Use Permits

Mount Rainier National Park, a recognizable national landmark with inspiring vistas and natural settings, is an ideal spot for a variety of special activities. Most special events and activities held within Mount Rainier National Park require a Special Use Permit. These permits are issued and approved only after National Park Service staff determine that the activity will not impair park values, resources, and visitor enjoyment.
A Special Use Permit is required for activities that provide a benefit to an individual, group, or organization, rather than the public at large and for activities that require some degree of management by the National Park Service in order to protect park resources and the public interest.

Please allow two weeks for the processing of permit applications. Provide a fax number if possible.

Please read this legal notice regarding payment of fees by check.


Activities and events that require Special Use Permits include:

Organized Group Recreation: permit information, application

Filming/Photography: permit information, long form application, short form application

Wedding Ceremonies: permit information, application

Scattering of Ashes: permit information, application

Military Operations: permit information, application

First Amendment Activities: permit information, application, First Amendment Special Use Locations

Other Special Events (Rallies, Sporting Events, etc.): permit information, application

Did You Know?

The mountain's namesake: Rear Admiral Peter Rainier of the British Navy.

In 1792, Captain George Vancouver of the British Navy became the first European to sail into the Puget Sound. On the horizon, he noted a large, snowy mountain, known to local Native Americans as Tahoma, Takhoma, or Tacobet. Vancouver named it for his colleague Rear Admiral Peter Rainier.