• Mount Rainier peeks through clouds, viewed across subalpine wildflowers and glacial moraine.

    Mount Rainier

    National Park Washington

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  • Nisqually to Paradise delays and Kautz Creek area closure.

    Road construction from the Nisqually Entrance to Longmire. Expect a 30-minute delay, Monday through Friday. Beginning May 29 to mid-July, all services at the Kautz Creek parking and picnic area are closed through the week. Limited parking on Sat & Sun. More »

Special Use Permits

Mount Rainier National Park, a recognizable national landmark with inspiring vistas and natural settings, is an ideal spot for a variety of special activities. Most special events and activities held within Mount Rainier National Park require a Special Use Permit. These permits are issued and approved only after National Park Service staff determine that the activity will not impair park values, resources, and visitor enjoyment.
A Special Use Permit is required for activities that provide a benefit to an individual, group, or organization, rather than the public at large and for activities that require some degree of management by the National Park Service in order to protect park resources and the public interest.

Please allow two weeks for the processing of permit applications. Provide a fax number if possible.

Please read this legal notice regarding payment of fees by check.


Activities and events that require Special Use Permits include:

Organized Group Recreation: permit information, application

Filming/Photography: permit information, long form application, short form application

Wedding Ceremonies: permit information, application

Scattering of Ashes: permit information, application

Military Operations: permit information, application

First Amendment Activities: permit information, application, First Amendment Special Use Locations

Other Special Events (Rallies, Sporting Events, etc.): permit information, application

Did You Know?

The toe of Carbon Glacier appears dirty as it is covered in silt. Mount Rainier is in the background.

Carbon Glacier, on the north side of Mount Rainier, comes to the lowest elevation of any glacier in the lower 48 states at 3500 feet. It is also Mount Rainier's thickest glacier, one section being nearly 700 feet thick.