• Mount Rainier peeks through clouds, viewed across subalpine wildflowers and glacial moraine.

    Mount Rainier

    National Park Washington

Transportation Mini-Grants Available for School Field Trips to Mount Rainier National Park

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Date: March 2, 2012
Contact: Fawn Bauer, 360-569-6591

Mount Rainier National Park is now accepting applications for transportation mini-grants to help subsidize bus transportation for school field trips to the park.

Through a "Connecting Kids to Parks" grant from Washington's National Park Fund, Mount Rainier National Park will be offering several mini-grants to help subsidize transportation costs for school groups bringing students to the park during this 2011-2012 school year.

These mini-grants are intended to be cost-share subsidies for bus transportation, so that the maximum amount of students can benefit. Number and size of grants will vary, depending on how many requests we receive relative to our available funding; with most grants being in the $150-$250 range. In order to qualify for the grant and to support our climate friendly park initiative; students must be transported by bus, with one additional support vehicle for the group. School groups ma not receive more than one grant per school year.

These mini-grants are mad possible in an effort to increase the accessibility of park experiences for youth who may not otherwise have an opportunity to visit a national park In order to be considered for a field trip bus subsidy during the 2011-2012 school year, teachers can request a transportation grant application by contacting Fawn Bauer by email. If you need information about the types of programs that are offered, please contact the Mount Rainier National Park Educational Center at (360) 569-6590 or at the email above.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

The toe of Carbon Glacier appears dirty as it is covered in silt. Mount Rainier is in the background.

Carbon Glacier, on the north side of Mount Rainier, comes to the lowest elevation of any glacier in the lower 48 states at 3500 feet. It is also Mount Rainier's thickest glacier, one section being nearly 700 feet thick.