• Mount Rainier peeks through clouds, viewed across subalpine wildflowers and glacial moraine.

    Mount Rainier

    National Park Washington

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Temporary Closure of Laughingwater Creek Trail

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Date: September 7, 2012
Contact: Chief Ranger Chuck Young, 360-569-6612
Contact: Supv. Park Ranger Geoff Walker, 360-569-6671

Mount Rainier National Park officials advise that the Laughingwater Creek Trail has been temporarily closed to the public from the trailhead at Highway 123 to the ranger cabin at Three Lakes due to potential wildlife hazards. The closure will last until September 19 or until further notice.

On September 5, a pack animal succumbed to natural causes while on the trail. While the carcass has been moved off the trail, it may attract large predators such as bears or mountain lions, which may create hazardous conditions for hikers in the area. Rangers will monitor the trail over the next week and a half to determine when the trail can be safely reopened. 

Please check the park website at www.nps.gov/mora for the most up-to-date information on the status of this and all other park trails. 

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Artist rendering of the Osceola Mudflow releasing from Mount Rainier.

About 5,600 years ago the summit and northeast face of Mount Rainier fell away in a massive landslide accompanied by volcanic explosions. The Osceola Mudflow, a towering wall of mud and rock, thundered down the White River Valley where it deposited 600' of debris eventually reaching the Puget Sound.