• Mount Rainier peeks through clouds, viewed across subalpine wildflowers and glacial moraine.

    Mount Rainier

    National Park Washington

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Mount Rainier National Park Releases Twitter Page

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Date: June 13, 2011
Contact: Patti Wold, Public Information Officer, 360-569-6563

Superintendent Dave Uberuaga announces the launching of the Official Mount Rainier National Park Twitter page. Follow the park on Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/MountRainierNPS to discover news as it's happening, learn more about park topics that are important to you, and get the inside scoop in real time. 

Before you leave home, or during a stop while en route to the park, check the park out on Twitter. Is the parking lot full at Paradise? Are the roads open throughout the park? Are there any emergency situations that will affect your visit? Keep up-to-date on road and facility openings and closures, emergency situations, special events, and watch for other noteworthy and timely tweets.

Future plans for park social media include Facebook, Flickr and YouTube pages. The best place to learn about the launching of these sites is on the Official Mount Rainier National Park Twitter page!

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Artist rendering of the Osceola Mudflow releasing from Mount Rainier.

About 5,600 years ago the summit and northeast face of Mount Rainier fell away in a massive landslide accompanied by volcanic explosions. The Osceola Mudflow, a towering wall of mud and rock, thundered down the White River Valley where it deposited 600' of debris eventually reaching the Puget Sound.