• Mount Rainier peeks through clouds, viewed across subalpine wildflowers and glacial moraine.

    Mount Rainier

    National Park Washington

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  • Nisqually to Paradise delays and Kautz Creek area closure.

    Road construction from the Nisqually Entrance to Longmire. Expect a 30-minute delay, Monday through Friday. Beginning May 29 to mid-July, all services at the Kautz Creek parking and picnic area are closed through the week. Limited parking on Sat & Sun. More »

Environmental Factors

A member of the Mount Rainier revegetation crew rappelling to pull invasive plants.

A member of the Mount Rainier Revegetation crew rappelling to pull invasive (nonnative) plants.

NPS Photo

Mount Rainier is a Class I air quality area. The Clean Air Act requires federal land managers to protect park air quality related values, which include scenic, natural, and cultural resources. Air quality impacts have occurred in the park due to recreational use and are a concern, as are regional effects on the park.

The water resources in the park are protected and managed under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, and the Clean Water Act of 1977. NPS Management Policies also require the protection and conservation of water quality in the park.

About 149 exotic (nonnative) plant species are found in the park. Most nonnative species grow in disturbed habitat below 5,500 feet. Their presence is the result of human intervention, not natural migration. About 10% of the species are aggressive, capable of invading undisturbed natural areas and dominating native plant communities.

Did You Know?

Volunteers from Japan working on the Kautz boardwalk accessible trail.

Mount Fuji in Japan is Mount Rainier's sister mountain. Visitors from Japan have noted a strong resemblance between the two volcanoes. Mount Rainier is honored to have a contingent of volunteers from Japan come to the park each year for two weeks to work on a project.