• An explosion of light as the sun strikes the waters of the Missouri National Recreational River

    Missouri

    National Recreational River SD,NE

Student Positions

Current Openings For 2012!
Missouri National Recreational River (MNRR) is now accepting applications from freshman, sophomore and junior level college students for summer 2012 positions. A full application package should include:

  • Resume
  • Copy of most recent transcripts
  • Documentation showing enrollment for the coming semester
  • Letter requesting consideration for an intern position with MNRR


Working As An Intern For MNRR
Student interns work with park staff and partners to develop and present interpretive programs for visitors to the Missouri National Recreational River. In addition, interns may present or assist with special programs & events as well as help staff visitor centers.

Due to the variety of park themes and resources and the diversity of groups served, interns have the opportunity to learn about and teach a wide variety of topics. Qualified applicants must have experience working with public, think and act creatively, possess excellent communication and problem solving skills, have a sense of wonder, and be able to meet the physical and mental demands of working outdoors.

Commitment
Summer positions run from mid-May through mid-August. Interns are expected to work 40 hours/week and complete the entire duration of the internships.

Benefits
Student interns receive pay at the GS-03 or GS-04 level depending upon their qualifications. Uniform shirts, jackets, and hats are provided. Housing is available at nearby Mount Marty College in Yankton.

For Additional Information
Please contact Chris Wilkinson, the Chief of Interpretation & Education, at 605-665-0209 ext. 29 or by e-mail.

Did You Know?

Missouri River Delta at Lewis & Clark Lake

Before the 1950s, the Missouri River carried an average of roughly 140 million tons of sediment per year past Yankton. After closure of the dams in the 1960s, an average of roughly 4 million tons per year moved past the same location.