• An explosion of light as the sun strikes the waters of the Missouri National Recreational River

    Missouri

    National Recreational River SD,NE

Fees & Reservations

ENTRANCE FEES
NONE! The National Park Service charges no fees, nor is a fee charged at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center adjacent to Gavins Point Dam. However, our state park partners do charge:

Nebraska State Park Partners

  • Niobrara State Park
  • Ponca State Park
  • Lewis and Clark Lake State Recreation Area (Nebraska)

All require a valid entry permit. An annual permit is $26.00* per vehicle. A second permit costs $13.50.* The daily permit is $5.00* per vehicle.
* A 35 cent vendor fee applies to permits bought outside the parks.

South Dakota State Park Partners

  • Randall Creek Recreation Area
  • Lewis and Clark State Recreation Area (South Dakota) including the Chief White Crane & Pierson Ranch areas)

These areas require a valid entry permit. As of October 2012, an annual permit is $30 per vehicle. A second vehicle permit costs $15. A transferable annual permit (one vehicle at a time) is $65. The daily entry permit is $4 if the vehicle has only one occupant; otherwise, it is $6 per vehicle.

FISHING & Hunting Licenses

CAMPING RESERVATIONS

  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Campgrounds: (Cottonwood and Nebraska Tailwaters, both in Nebraska); call 1-877-444-6777 or go online for reservations. Reservations are taken for the period Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend.
  • Nebraska's Lewis and Clark Lake State Recreation Area, Ponca State Park or Niobrara State Park: To make reservations call 402-471-1414 or go online.
  • South Dakota's Lewis and Clark State Recreation Area, Randall Creek RA and Springfield RA: To make reservations call 1-800-710-2267 or go online.
  • Clay County Park: Just west of Vermillion, first come sites are available. This is a quiet, secluded campground with tall trees and nearby access to the Missouri River.

All of the above campgrounds have both reservable and first-come sites in addition to electric hook-ups.

 

Federal Recreation Passes
The America the Beautiful - National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass - Annual Pass ($80) and the America the Beautiful - National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass - Senior Pass ($10) are available at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center.

All existing Golden Access and Golden Age passes will continue to be honored according to the provisions of the pass. Only paper Golden Age and Access Passports may be exchanged free of charge for new plastic passes.

Access (disability) passes are not available at the Lewis & Clark Visitor Center. The nearest outlets for these are at:
Homestead National Monument, Beatrice, Nebraska
Pipestone National Monument, Pipestone, Minnesota
DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge, Missouri Valley, Iowa
Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail, Omaha, Nebraska

 
FY11-Annual-Pass

Interagency Annual Pass

Interagency Annual Pass
The $80 Interagency Annual Pass provides entrance or access to pass holder and accompanying passengers in a single, private non-commercial vehicle at most federal recreation sites across the country. Pass is valid for 12 months from date of purchase.

 
Interagency Senior Pass

Interagency Senior Pass

Interagency Senior Pass
The $10 Interagency Senior Pass (62 and older) is a lifetime pass available to U.S. citizens or permanent residents. Pass is available to purchase in-person only and with appropriate documentation.

 
Interagency Access Pass

Interagency Access Pass
Free lifetime pass available to citizens or permanent residents of the U.S. who have been determined to be blind or permanently disabled. Pass is available only in-person and with appropriate documentation.

 

SPECIAL USE FEES AND PERMITS

Research projects and commercial photography and filming require a special use permit. Click for application forms.

Did You Know?

Missouri River Delta at Lewis & Clark Lake

Before the 1950s, the Missouri River carried an average of roughly 140 million tons of sediment per year past Yankton. After closure of the dams in the 1960s, an average of roughly 4 million tons per year moved past the same location.