• Mississippi National River and Recreation Area

    Mississippi

    National River & Recreation Area Minnesota

The River Ranger Program

Logos of the University of Minnesota and the National Park Service.

River Rangers are students who have made the Mississippi River an important part of their college experience. Some work on service projects such as river cleanup, while others undertake research on some aspect of river life. All Rangers are affiliated with the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area. At this time the program is based at the University of Minnesota's Institute on the Environment, but as the program grows, River Rangers will be drawn from many local schools. Check out the River Ranger page for more information.

Involvement in the River Ranger program connects students to the many great local places, programs, and learning opportunities within the park, and can meet some requirements for your major or connect you to the National Park Service. The River Ranger program is inspired by the pledge our Junior Rangers take to "explore, learn about, and protect the Mississippi River." It's your river on your campus. Why wouldn't you want to become involved?

The River Ranger program helps connect students to the river, and as a student, you can get you as involved as you like. There are no fees and it is a great, fun yet informative learning opportunity. For information about the program, simply contact us to receive e-mails. You will receive information about the public programs that might be of interest, as well as notice of special programs specifically for River Rangers.

 

Program Contacts:

David Wiggins, Park Ranger

National Park Service
808 14th Avenue Southeast
Minneapolis, MN 55414-1516
Telephone: (612) 676-9486
Fax: (612) 676-9401
E-mail

Pat Nunnally, Coordinator

River Life Program
Institute on the Environment (IonE)
University of Minnesota
Telephone: (612) 626-7014
E-mail

Did You Know?

A flooded street in 1952

In 1952, the Mississippi River flooded hundreds of acres of farmland and multiple cities. Over 2,000 families were homeless because of the high water. More...