• Mississippi National River and Recreation Area

    Mississippi

    National River & Recreation Area Minnesota

First Bridge Park

Minneapolis Park and Recreation
1 West River Parkway, Minneapolis, MN 55401

 
 
A small bronze statue of a Mississippi River snapping turtle rests on a short wall.

Numerous bronze sculptures of Mississippi wildlife, such as this snapping turtle, adorn the top of the sitting wall that curves through the park.

Overview
Until late 1854, travelers bound for the west crossed the Mississippi River by fording the river and later by ferry. Then in 1854, the first bridge to span the Mississippi River anywhere along its length was constructed at this location by a group of speculators led by Franklin Steele.

Up to this time roads and trails tended to run parallel to the river and brought people and goods to the river’s banks for transport north or south by ship. Bridges changed this dynamic as goods could be shipped east and west across the river.

The original bridge at this location was operated as a private toll bridge until it was purchased in 1869 by Hennepin County. Unfortunately, it quickly deteriorated and was replaced by a succession of three other bridges built in this same location.

The current Hennepin Avenue Bridge was constructed in 1990, but pilings and artifacts from those previous bridges still exist and are preserved within the park. Interpretive panels summarize the area’s rich history.

A curving wall is a great place to sit and view the river. Look for artwork embedded on the wall, sidewalk, and elsewhere in the park. The park is on the west bank of the river and is linked to other nearby parks through an extensive trail system.

Activities: Walking and biking paths, river viewing, public art, fishing.

Hours: 6 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., unless otherwise posted.

Contact Information: Call the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation at 612-230-6400.

 

 
 
 

Did You Know?

The wide Mississippi River

At Lake Onalaska, near LaCrosse WI, the Mississippi River is about 4 miles wide. The combination of water held behind Lock and Dam #7 and water held by damming the Black River form this broad reach of the Mississippi River.