• Mississippi National River and Recreation Area

    Mississippi

    National River & Recreation Area Minnesota

Second Annual Mississippi River Forum Workshop

Presentations and Documents

Joe Stewig and Joel Stiras, MN Department of Natural Resources, Fisheries

The Mississippi River: A Diamond in the Rough
Although some in the fishing community try to keep it a secret, segments of the Mississippi River in Minnesota are becoming world-class fishery for smallmouth bass, walleye, and channel catfish. This session compared the condition of the fishery in the St. Cloud-to-Anoka stretch to the Twin Cities' fishery from the Ford Dam to the Hastings Dam.
Mr. Stewig's presentation, given by Mr Stiras (PDF, 2.8mb)
Mr. Stiras presentation (PDF, 4.2mb)

Barb Peichel, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency

Bacteria in the Upper Mississippi River: What We Are Finding and How We Can Make Reductions At last year’s kick-off workshop, participants received an overview of the Upper Mississippi River’s Bacteria Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) process--which is underway to address bacterial contamination within a roughly 100-mile stretch of the river from St. Cloud to Hastings.
Ms. Peichel's presentation (PDF, 5.6mb)

Greg Lais, Wilderness Inquiry

UWCA: Urban Wilderness Canoe Adventure on the Urban Mississippi River
The Mississippi River in the heart of the Twin Cities metro is a national park, yet few people realize what a tremendous--and easily accessible--recreational opportunity it provides! The UWCA program, a partnership between the National Park Service, Wilderness Inquiry, and the Mississippi River Fund, has been getting thousands of people onto the river since its launch in 2009--most of them urban youth who may be the next generation of river managers, if not river users.
Mr. Lais' presentation (PDF, 5.4mb)

Dave Legvold, Dakota County Farmer

Minnesota Agriculture: Out of Step with Water Quality Standards?
We rely on farmers for food and fuel production and as land managers; they depend on consumers for their livelihood; and the entire system has come to rely on a little thing called The Farm Bill. Agricultural production has water quality impacts, but we too often get caught up in arguments that do not move us anywhere, rather than coming to real and shared solutions.
Mr. Legvold's presentation (PDF, 5.0mb)

Did You Know?

A flooded street in 1952

In 1952, the Mississippi River flooded hundreds of acres of farmland and multiple cities. Over 2,000 families were homeless because of the high water. More...