• Mississippi National River and Recreation Area

    Mississippi

    National River & Recreation Area Minnesota

Kingfisher (Belted)

The rattling call of the belted kingfisher is often what attracts our attention to these handsome birds. Found along waterways, they have favorite perches along the edge of the river or lake from which they fish and patrol their territories.

The kingfisher nests in vertical embankments along river or lakeshores. They excavate a long tunnel, sometimes as much as 15 feet long, with an entrance hole located about a foot from the top of the embankment. The tunnel ends in a small chamber that is just slightly larger than the tunnel itself. The eggs are laid on the floor without any additional construction or materials.

The adults guard the nesting territory from favorite perches. Interestingly, these birds may establish a separate feeding territory that doesn't include the nesting burrow. Researchers suggest that this is due to good feeding areas are not always available near good nesting areas.

Fascinating Facts

Territorial kingfishers often fly along the rivershore as a boat approaches, but will soon perch. As the boat approaches again, it will leave the perch calling loudly. This cycle may occur several times until the kingfisher reaches the end of his territory, at which point it will loop back around the boat. A careful observer can often estimate the size of a kingfisher’s territory by watching this behavior.

Kingfishers make spectacular headlong dives into the water to nab their prey, usually small fishes.

A pair of kingfishers can excavate about a foot of nesting tunnel each day.

 
A kingfisher perches on a pole while guarding its territory.
 
 

Belted Kingfisher (Megacyrle alcyon)

Key ID Features: Pigeon-sized. Both sexes alike, but female has rusty belly band.

Present in Park: Year round, as long as there is open water in which to fish. Others migrate south. Listen for their rattling calls along shorelines. A good place to see these birds is Hidden Falls Regional Park and Crosby Farm Regional Park.

Habitat: Wooded shores along rivers and some lakes. Nests in burrows in vertical shoreline banks.

Did You Know?

Coon Rapids Dam

Over 600 men worked around the clock using hand tools, horses and coal powered shovels to build the original Coon Rapids Dam in 1913. The dam was rebuilt between 1995 and 1997.