• View through the barbed wire from inside the camp looking east.

    Minidoka

    National Historic Site ID,WA

Frequently Asked Questions

Is there a visitor center at Minidoka?

No, at this time there is no visitor center located on site. Hagerman Fossil Beds NM is the temporary location for visitor services and does have an informational display area.

Where do I get my passport book stamped?
Minidoka Internment National Monument’s passport cancellation stamp is available in Hagerman Fossil Beds’ Visitor Center.

What is left at the site to see?

Most of the site’s buildings and structures were removed. The barrack areas were plowed under so currently not much remains of the original camp. If you do go, you will see the remains of the entry guard station, waiting room, ornamental rock garden and commemorative plaques.

What happened to all the buildings from the camp?

After the war, the camp’s buildings were dismantled or relocated. Former Minidoka War Relocation Center buildings can be found throughout the Twin Falls area and beyond.

Do former internees come back to visit?
Former internees return to Minidoka frequently. The Friends of Minidoka, a non profit educational organization, sponsors a pilgrimage to Minidoka every year during June or July. Many former internees, and a growing number of interested people, participate in this event.

Can I camp at Minidoka?

Camping is not allowed in Minidoka Internment National Monument, but there are numerous camping facilities in the nearby communities. Picnicking is allowed at the site, pack it in - pack it out. There are no established picnic facilities (tables, etc.) There is one handicap accessible port-o-potty on site.

Can I bring my dog to the site?
Dogs are welcome at Minidoka, but they must be on a leash and owners must clean up after their pets. Pets are not allowed in buildings . Please be aware that our parking lot has little to no shade and summer temperatures are frequently over 100.

Did You Know?

Hunt Post Office

The Relocation Center was nicknamed “Hunt Camp” after the Hunt, Idaho post office where internees received their mail. The camp is still known locally by that name.