• Mt. Williamson and cemetery monument

    Manzanar

    National Historic Site California

Park Planning

In fiscal years 2009-10, Congress approved funding to reconstruct two barracks buildings in Block 14. Barracks 1 appears as it would have when Japanese Americans first arrived at Manzanar in 1942 while Barracks 8 represents life in 1945. In 2011, exhibits were installed in a restored World War II-era mess hall. Future plans include reconstructing one or more additional buildings in the block such as latrines, a laundry room or an ironing room. Friends of Manzanar (www.friendsofmanzanar.org) is engaged in fund-raising for the additional buildings.

In 2005 the National Park Service launched a new website, Planning, Environment, and Public Comment (PEPC), where you can read about proposed projects and plans in parks and where you can add your comments electronically.

We invite you to take an active role in park planning.

 

Manzanar's Long Range Interpretive Plan (2007) provides interpretive direction for the park that was developed with public input and involvement. The park is engaged in the long-term process of realizing the visions outlined in this plan, as well as in the site's General Management Plan (1996).

Manzanar's Cultural Landscape Report (2006) provides recommendations for the park landscape as a whole. These recommendations provide a board framework for future treatment with some specific examples.

The Orchard Management Plan (2010) provides objectives and guidance for the management of park orchards. Recommendations call for the restoration and rehabilitation of portions of five town-era orchards.

Manzanar's Museum Management Plan (2012) identifies the key collection issues facing the park, and presents a series of recommendations to address those issues.

Did You Know?

Manzanar apple crate label. Courtesy of Eastern California Museum.

Before World War II, Manzanar was an orchard community. The name “Manzanar” is Spanish for apple orchard.