• Council House Front Door

    Mary McLeod Bethune Council House

    National Historic Site DC

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  • Archives Relocated to Museum Resource Center

    The National Park Service (NPS) has relocated the National Archives for Black Women’s History collection from Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site to the NPS’s Museum Resource Center in Landover, Maryland. More »

  • Parking Advisory

    On-street parking is limited, public transportation suggested. Nearest Metros are the U Street and McPherson Square stations. Please be aware street sweeping occurs on Wednesday and Thursday from 9:30-11:30am, further limiting parking during that time. More »

Park Planning

National Park Service News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: August 8, 2014
Contact: Jenny Anzelmo-Sarles, 202-619-7177, jenny_anzelmo-sarles@nps.gov

National Park Service Seeks Nominations to Federal Advisory Commission for the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site

WASHINGTON – The National Park Service is seeking nominations for individuals to be considered for appointment to the advisory commission for the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site. Appointments to the 15-member federal advisory commission serve terms of four years. Written nominations are being accepted until September 8, 2014.

Congress authorized the commission on December 11, 1991, for the purpose of advising the Secretary of the Interior on matters relating to the management and development of the historic site. The commission retains three seats for members of the general public in addition to three members appointed from recommendations submitted by the National Council of Negro Women, two members appointed from recommendations submitted by other national organizations in which Mary McLeod Bethune played a leadership role, three members with professional experience in archival management, two members with professional expertise in historic preservation and two members with expertise in African American women’s history. Individuals currently registered as a federal lobbyists are ineligible for appointment.

Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site, located at 1318 Vermont Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C., interprets the legacy of Mary McLeod Bethune, the National Council of Negro Women and other associated Civil Rights organizations and leaders, including notable figures such as Dr. Dorothy Height.

Nominations should be typed and must include: a brief summary (no more than two pages) explaining the nominee’s suitability to serve on the commission; a resume or curriculum vitae; and at least one letter of reference. Send complete nomiation packages to Judy Bowman, Office of the Regional Director, National Park Service at 1100 Ohio Drive SW., Washington, D.C. 20242. All required documents must be compiled and submitted in one complete nomination package. Incomplete submissions will not be considered. Nominations must be received by September 8, 2014.

For more information about submitting nominations, please contact the Office of the Superintendent, National Capital Parks-East at (202) 690-5127 or email NACE_Superintendent@nps.gov.

 

To access the Federal Register website for nominations for the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House NHS Advisory Commission, please click here.

 

General Management Plan

General management plans are required for each unit of the national park system. The purpose of this general management plan is to provide a clearly defined direction for visitor use and resource preservation and to provide a basic foundation for decision making and managing the national historic site for the next 10 to 15 years.

Download the General Management Plan in PDF format (3.72 MB).

Did You Know?

The Mary McLeod Bethune Memorial, Lincoln Park, Washington, DC

The Mary McLeod Bethune Memorial Statue, in Lincoln Park in Washington, DC, was the first statue erected to a woman or African American of honor. The 17-foot-high bronze statue shows Bethune handing off her sum of learning to two children, representing the next generation of African Americans.