• The Historic Entrance of Mammoth Cave

    Mammoth Cave

    National Park Kentucky

The Clean Cities National Parks Initiative at Mammoth Cave — in Pictures

GEM electric vehicle with ranger

The GEM electric vehicle will be used for numerous tasks that take rangers around the Mammoth Cave Campground and the Visitor Center area.

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Ranger fueling propane-powered truck

A Mammoth Cave National Park ranger refuels one of the two new propane-powered pickups trucks, provided to the park via the Department of Energy-Clean Cities/National Park Initiative.

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Concessions bus driver with new propane-powered tour bus

Staff from Forever Resorts, Mammoth Cave National Park's concessioner, will operate the new propane-powered buses, provided to the park via the Department of Energy-Clean Cities/National Park Initiative.

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Ribbon-cutting for the new alternative fuel vehicles

Victor Peek Photography

Andrew Hudgins of the Department of Energy-National Renewable Energy Laboratory cuts the ribbon on one of the new propane-powered buses at Mammoth Cave National Park.

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Superintendent Reed and others with an alterative fuels display

Victor Peek Photography

Bill Jacobs, president of the Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition; Brian Cook, National Park Service Environmental Management Program Coordinator for the Southeast Region; Andrew Hudgins of the Department of Energy-National Renewable Energy Laboratory; and Mammoth Cave National Park Superintendent Patrick H. Reed unveil a new display regarding alternative fuel use in the park.

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Officials with electric- and propane-powered vehicles

Victor Peek Photography

Standing in front of the new Global Electric Motorcar and the new propane-powered pickup trucks, are Brian Cook, National Park Service Environmental Management Program Coordinator for the Southeast Region; Melissa Howell, Executive Director of the Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition; and Mammoth Cave National Park Superintendent Patrick H. Reed; and Andrew Hudgins of the Department of Energy-National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

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Group photo in front of propane-powered tour bus

Victor Peek Photography

The Department of Energy-Clean Cities/National Park Initiative replaced old vehicles with new alternative fuel vehicles. Here ceremony participants stand in from of a 1977 model bus and a gasoline-powered pickup that were replaced with propane vehicles.

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Superintendent Reed and others with alternative fuel vehicles

Victor Peek Photography

Melissa Howell, Executive Director of the Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition; Andrew Hudgins of the Department of Energy-National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Mammoth Cave National Park Superintendent Patrick H. Reed; and Brian Cook, National Park Service Environmental Management Program Coordinator for the Southeast Region stand in from of a 1977 model bus and a gasoline-powered pickup that were replaced with propane vehicles.

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An alternative fuel bus, truck and cart

Victor Peek Photography

The Department of Energy-Clean Cities/National Park Initiative replaced old vehicles with new alternative fuel vehicles. At Mammoth Cave National park, a 1977 model bus and a gasoline-powered pickup that were replaced with propane vehicles, and a gasoline-powered Cushman was replaced with a Global Electric Motorcar.

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Rear-view of an electric powered cart

Victor Peek Photography

Each of the new alternative fuel vehicles at Mammoth Cave National Park displays a decal acknowledging the Department of Energy- Clean Cities/National Park Initiative that provided the vehicles to the park.

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Group photo with new propane-powered tour bus

Victor Peek Photography

Ribbon-cutting participants assisted Andrew Hudgins of the Department of Energy-National Renewable Energy Laboratory, as he cuts the ribbon on one of the new propane-powered buses at Mammoth Cave National Park.

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Ranger and drivers with propane-powered buses

Forever Resorts bus drivers and a Mammoth Cave ranger prepare for the day. About 400,000 visitors tour Mammoth Cave every year; on a busy day, the propane buses, carrying visitors to remote cave entrances, can travel 400 miles in one day - all within the park. This year, Mammoth Cave received these four new propane buses via the DOE-Clean Cities/National Park Initiative.

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Did You Know?

Tuberculosis Hut in Mammoth Cave

In 1841, cave owner Dr. John Croghan believed the cave air might cure his patients suffering from tuberculosis. He brought 16 patients into Mammoth Cave that winter and housed them in stone and wood huts. After some perished, they left the cave, for of course the cave air offered no cure.