• The Historic Entrance of Mammoth Cave

    Mammoth Cave

    National Park Kentucky

Veterans Day Weekend brings Roots in the Cave and free tours

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Date: October 31, 2012
Contact: Vickie Carson, 270-758-2192
Contact: Mary Anne Davis, 270-773-5099

(MAMMOTH CAVE, Ky.- October 31, 2012) On November 9-12, Mammoth Cave National Park will recognize Veterans Day with special cave tours and historical programs.  This year Roots in the Cave, November 9-11, will focus on the Cutliff and McDaniel families, and is sponsored by the Mammoth Cave Hotel and Mammoth Cave National Park.  On November 10-12, the park will offer free Mammoth Passage Cave Tours. 

"Roots in the Cave is an annual fall event that explores the family histories and lore of those people who once lived on what is now parkland," said Acting Superintendent Bruce Powell. "On Veterans Day Weekend, we invite people out for the special history presentations and the free cave tours." 

Mammoth Cave became a national park in 1941, but before that time this land held 600 farms and 30 communities. Roots in the Cave draws descendants together to share stories and research.  The Hotel has organized a panel discussion, a genealogy room, and two cave trips (to the Violet City Lantern Tour and Proctor Cave) centered on Mammoth Cave's Pioneers of Discovery, like the Cutliff family and the McDaniel family. 

A registration fee of $25 includes the two cave tours and admission to the Friday night Panel Discussion. Admission to the Panel Discussion alone is $5, free with purchase of dinner in the hotel dining room. Five dollars of the registration fee will be refunded to registrants who have dinner in the dining room. Cave tours are limited to 40 participants. Registration will only be accepted beginning Friday at 5:30 at the Rotunda Room. No telephone registration is available for these activities.   Special hotel rate for Roots in the Cave participants is $45 plus tax; call 270-758-2225 for reservations.  

Some of the Roots in the Cave events are free of charge:

  • On Friday, 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., in the Rotunda Room at Mammoth Cave Hotel, a genealogy seminar will be presented by professional genealogist Mark Lowe. His topics will be "Kentucky, Whiskey and Southern Migration" and "Cemeteries as Genealogical Resources".
  • On Saturday, 7:00 p.m., in the Rotunda Room, Ranger Johnny Meredith will present a program entitled "George Morrison: Engineer, Explorer and Entrepreneur".
  • The genealogy room in the Rotunda Room will be open to the public on Friday, Saturday and Sunday; participants are encouraged to bring family information to share.     

For Roots in the Cave questions, please call Mary Anne Davis at 270-773-5099. For a personal copy of the agenda, write to maryanne_davis@yahoo.com. 

Free Mammoth Passage cave tours November 10-12 

On November 10, 11, and 12, the park will offer free guided Mammoth Passage tours. Each tour is limited to 50 people; visitors must pick up their free tickets at the visitor center prior to departure times.

Mammoth Passage tours will depart from the visitor center at 9:15, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 2:00, and 3:00. Mammoth Passage is a ¾-mile, 1¼ hour cave tour, and requires a walk down and up the hill below the visitor center, as well as 68 steps at the Historic Entrance.  

Note: tour requirements regarding white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats: While there are no known harmful effects to humans, WNS is responsible for the deaths of millions of hibernating bats across the eastern United States since its discovery in 2006. WNS has not been found in Mammoth Cave to date, however, park staff are taking precautions to minimize the spread of WNS fungus to or from Mammoth Cave. When going on a Mammoth Cave tour, do not wear clothing or shoes that have been worn in other caves or mines. All participants on cave tours must walk across aggressive turf mats to clean footwear immediately following the conclusion of their tour.  

www.nps.gov/maca  

Did You Know?

Grease-oil lamp

The grease-oil lamp was used to illuminate Mammoth Cave for more than a century. Designed after New England whale-oil lanterns, these lamps used cooking grease to light the way.