• The Historic Entrance of Mammoth Cave

    Mammoth Cave

    National Park Kentucky

Free Mammoth Passage tours February 15-17

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Date: February 10, 2014
Contact: Vickie Carson, 270-758-2192

(MAMMOTH CAVE, Ky., February 10, 2014) In honor of Presidents Weekend, Mammoth Cave National Park will offer free Mammoth Passage tours on February 15-17, 2014. 

“We all need a break from this winter weather, and a place to relax and refresh,” said Superintendent Sarah Craighead. “Mammoth Cave is the perfect place to do just that. Take a hike, ride a bike, bring your horse, or tour the Mammoth Passage for free. Enjoy your national park.” 

On Presidents Weekend, the park will offer free guided Mammoth Passage tours. Each tour is limited to 40 people; visitors must pick up their free tickets at the visitor center prior to departure times. Mammoth Passage tours will depart from the visitor center at 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 2:30, and 3:00. 

Mammoth Passage is a ¾-mile, 1¼ hour cave tour, and requires a walk down and up the steep hill below the visitor center, as well as 160 steps. 

Note: tour requirements regarding white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats: While there are no known harmful effects to humans, WNS is responsible for the deaths of millions of hibernating bats across the eastern United States since its discovery in 2006. WNS was found in outlying caves and passageways of Mammoth Cave in winter 2012-13, but has not yet been found in the toured sections. Park staff are taking precautions to minimize the spread of WNS fungus in and from Mammoth Cave. When going on a Mammoth Cave tour, do not wear clothing or shoes that have been worn in other caves or mines. All participants on cave tours must walk across bio-security mats to clean footwear immediately following the conclusion of their tour. 

Visit the Presidents Day page on www.nps.gov for a calendar of events, as well as travel itineraries and lesson plans about the presidents. 

www.nps.gov/maca  

Did You Know?

Grease-oil lamp

The grease-oil lamp was used to illuminate Mammoth Cave for more than a century. Designed after New England whale-oil lanterns, these lamps used cooking grease to light the way.