• The Historic Entrance of Mammoth Cave

    Mammoth Cave

    National Park Kentucky

Mammoth Cave National Park – what does it mean to you?

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Date: July 15, 2013
Contact: Vickie Carson, 270-758-2192

MAMMOTH CAVE, Ky. – Mammoth Cave National Park – what does it mean to you? That is what Superintendent Sarah Craighead is asking as Mammoth Cave National Park prepares a foundation document for its future planning and management. Public comment is welcome and needed. The public comment period is open July 15-29, 2013. 

"A foundation document involves revisiting a park's core mission and significance, what is important about the Park," said Craighead. "It answers the question – 'why do we care about this place?' It is a good starting point, and Director Jarvis has called upon every National Park Service area to complete a foundation document by 2016, the 100-year anniversary of the agency." 

Although Mammoth Cave's foundation document will not be a decision-making document and will not include actions or management strategies, it will describe a shared understanding of what is most important about the Park, its resources and values, and interpretive themes that tell the story of Mammoth Cave, above and below ground. The Park's 1983 General Management Plan needs updating, and the foundation document is the first step. 

The public is invited to play a role in charting the Park's future by sharing their thoughts on what is most significant about Mammoth Cave and to help identify its most pressing threats and opportunities. 

"Mammoth Cave is important to many people, in many different ways," said Craighead. "We want to hear all viewpoints." 

Written comments may be submitted July 15-29, 2013, through the NPS planning website at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/MACA. Visitors to the website will be able to submit responses to questions about the Park's significance, threats, and opportunities. 

www.nps.gov/maca

Did You Know?

Musicians often played in Mammoth Cave.

For many years, the chambers of Mammoth Cave rang with the sound of music. Visiting bands such as Landram's Sax-Horn Band and Luther Ewing's String Band, along with the Mammoth Cave Hotel's own local musicians, entertained visitors underground into the early 20th century.