• Students at South Peak

    Marsh - Billings - Rockefeller

    National Historical Park Vermont

Summer Youth Crew Trail Work

IMG_0156 VYCC MABI crew at Faulkner 2013

VYCC Trail Crew in Faulkner Park 2013

J Waite

Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller NHP
News Release

Contact: Ben Boettger (ben_boettger@nps.gov)

For Immediate Release:

This summer several of Woodstock's hiking trails, including the historic Faulkner Trail and Mount Tom carriage roads within Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller (MBR) National Historical Park have received care and attention from two youth trail crews and several interns. The National Park crews working on these trails were made possible through long-standing partnerships with the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps (VYCC) and the Student Conservation Association (SCA).

This is the fourth year crews have worked on the historic Faulkner Trail, the system's "major pedestrian gateway," according to Woodstock Trail Partnership representative Jennifer Waite. The goal of the renovations has been to restore the trail's historic features and address major safety hazards. The restoration will also raise the trail to the standards of the Federal Trail Accessibility Guidelines, making it one of the most accessible trails in the larger Woodstock Trails system.

To accomplish these tasks, the crews were paired with trail building experts Peter S. Jensen & Associates, of Washington, Vermont. A consultant from Jensen Associates, Erin Amadon, worked with the crew on the Faulkner trail, teaching them the challenging skills of stone movement and gravel surfacing. "It was really awesome to see how our hard work paid off when people would pass us and thank us for our work." VYCC Corps Member Dylan Orechovesky reflected.

Walkers on the Faulkner Trail can now appreciate the evenly graded gravel surface and the new stonework which they completed at the trail's entrance.

The restoration of the Faulkner Trail is an ongoing project of the Woodstock Trails Partnership. The trail was created by Marianne Faulkner in 1935 as a replica of a trail in the German spa village of Baden-Baden, originally designed for the rehabilitation of cardiac patients. Mrs. Faulkner built the trail in memory of her husband, Edward, who had visited Baden-Baden seeking relief from his arthritis. The Partnership plans to carry out further renovations of the Faulkner trail next summer.

The National Park trails and the Faulkner Trail are both elements of the 30-mile Walk Woodstock trail system. In addition to the Faulkner restoration work, the crews lent their talents and energy to removing invasive plants, maintaining carriage roads, managing the historic plantations, improving bird habitat, and restoring historic fence. They also resurfaced half a mile of the Recreation Path, which leads from the entrance of the National Park to the Mt. Tom Farmer's Market.

The VYCC Community Crew included eight local high school students: Alex King, Kent Dalton, Seth Sterling, Connor Skehan, Sahara Bebo, Alison Zug, Dylan Orechovesky, and Griffin Balser. The Student Conservation Association (SCA) crew consisted of students recruited from around the country, including Maryland, Colorado, Texas, Oregon, Connecticut, Washington DC, and Pennsylvania.

The National Park annually hosts youth crews in partnership with the VYCC and SCA. To learn about youth crew and internship opportunities at the National Park, contact Kathleen Robbins at e-mail us. To learn more about the Woodstock Trails Partnership and efforts to preserve and promote Woodstock trails, contact Jennifer Waite at e-mail us.

Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller
National Historical Park
54 Elm Street
Woodstock, VT 05091

802-457-3368 phone
802-457-3405 fax

National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior

Did You Know?

A man dressed all in white is contrasted by the dark and knobbly bark of spruce trees. Published in American Forests magazine in 1910.

Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller NHP and Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt NHS have in common a passion for trees! Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller has the oldest sustainably managed woodland in North America. FDR, an amateur forester, personally supervised the planting of hundreds of trees on his Hyde Park estate.