• Students at South Peak

    Marsh - Billings - Rockefeller

    National Historical Park Vermont

Mercury Project

Mercury

Mercury Sampling locally

This will be the fourth year we have received funding from the National Park Foundation to help Woodstock High School students monitor Mercury (Hg) at the Pogue at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park and Stevens High School students monitor at Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site. Students work in teams to formulate their own questions about Hg in our community and try to test their hypothesis based on the data they collect and other research.
 
2014 posters collage

Click here to view 2014 posters

Poster Presentations @ Dartmouth College - Congratulations Students!
The evening presentation of their projects started out with a keynote presentation by Kent McFarland, Conservation Biologist at Vermont Center for EcoStudies. After the keynote, everyone was invited to walk around and see the student poster presentations and ask them about their work.


Woodstock Union High School Biology Teacher Jennifer Stainton, was recognized as 2013 Outstanding Biology Teacher of the Year, in part for her 9th grade science classes' study of mercury in the environment at the park.

Link to previous years' information.
 

 
Mercury in the environment

How Mercury Enters the Environment

US EPA

Nationally

"Dragonfly larvae are currently being sampled for mercury levels in national parks. Mercury is a toxic pollutant that can harm human and wildlife health, threatening the natural resources the NPS is charged with protecting. The main source of human-caused mercury in remote national park environments is atmospheric deposition from coal-burning power plants.

National parks from Alaska to Florida and Maine to California are participating in the study. The data are available via the Citizen Scientists Study page link below. Ultimately, results will allow comparisons between parks, and will shed light on ecosystem health by characterizing the risk and potential transfer of mercury around food webs."

Read more details about the National Park Service's study: Citizen Scientists Study Mercury in Dragonfly Larvae

Link to the US Environmental Protection Agency's Mercury exposure pages.

Did You Know?

Sunlight filters through white clouds and dark thunderheads to illuminate green-forested slopes and snow-covered mountains. NPS Photo.

Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller NHP has nearly 400 paintings and prints, including Hudson River School landscapes of places that are now national parks. You can see paintings by Thomas Cole, David Johnson, and Albert Bierstadt of features from Yosemite, Golden Gate, and Grand Teton.